Thread Rating:

pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 2nd, 2012 at 6:30:20 AM permalink
Quote: etymonline

Exactly which blow is meant is the subject of some debate; the word might have begun as a euphemism for suck, or it might refer to the explosive climax of an orgasm. Unlike much sex slang, its date of origin probably is pretty close to the date it first is attested in print (1933): as recently as the early 1950s, military pilots could innocently talk of their jet planes as blow jobs according to the "Thesaurus of American Slang."

This usage probably is not connected to the colloquial imprecation (1781, associated with sailors, e.g. Popeye's "well, blow me down!").



Translation: chupársela or comérsela a alguien (español de España)
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 2nd, 2012 at 6:34:54 AM permalink
For the record, I do know all the translations pertaining to the sexual aspects of "blow." But I'm not comfortable writing about them.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 2nd, 2012 at 6:53:51 AM permalink
The original question is "could a Spanish word have two very different meanings", which are not obviously related.

The word run is ancient, but the idea of machinery running is 450 years old. The idea of run out of or "exhausting your supply" is 300 years old, and a run-in with your boss or total number of copies printed is 100 years old. A run in your stockings is 90 years old.

It is generally my belief that English words have far more definitions than Spanish ones, but I might think that only because English is my native language.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 2nd, 2012 at 7:16:18 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The original question is "could a Spanish word have two very different meanings", which are not obviously related.



I should think this happens in every language.

Quote:

It is generally my belief that English words have far more definitions than Spanish ones, but I might think that only because English is my native language.



It could be. Even when related, two meanings can be different. Take this sentence: "A place with a population so small has no place in a list of prominent places in the first place." Funny thing is it translates almost word for word into Spanish. "Un lugar con una población tan pequeña no tiene lugar en una lista de luagares en primer lugar."

Anyway, I consider English to be more flexible. There's a dialogue scene in Robert Heinelen's much overated work "Stranger in a Strange Land," where a multilingual character comapres languages to maps. He makes the comparison that some languages are like maps with a large scale (that is many miles per inch of map), and some are like maps in a small scale (few miles per inch of map). The point being both maps can guide you from one point to another, but the lower scale lets you see more possible routes.

So, just abut any language can express any idea, but some give you more options as to how, and some give you more precision in such expression. But there's also culture to consider. There are a few ideas which can be expressed in one word in language A, which require a sentence in language B, and a complex sentence in language C.

For example, the English verb "to earn," is as near to untranslatable to Spanish as a word can be. Some simply translate it as "ganar," but that si simplistic and carries some semantical and philosophical issues with it, as "ganar" mostly means "to win" without regard of how the win comes about. So to explain "to earn" I would say "obtener algo por esfuerzo propio" = "to obtain something by your own efforts."

Oh, well, it's too early in the morning for this kind of thread.... :)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 2nd, 2012 at 7:32:29 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

For example, the English verb "to earn," is as near to untranslatable to Spanish as a word can be. Some simply translate it as "ganar," but that si simplistic and carries some semantical and philosophical issues with it, as "ganar" mostly means "to win" without regard of how the win comes about. So to explain "to earn" I would say "obtener algo por esfuerzo propio" = "to obtain something by your own efforts."



I never realized that the verbs "to win" and "to earn" are both translated as "ganar" in the dictionaries. The phrases unearned income and earned income are pretty common in economic theory and in the tax code.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
April 2nd, 2012 at 8:09:56 AM permalink
Fecha: 2 de April, 2012
Palabra: Chula


Paco just recommended a restaurant to me in Chula Vista, California. CV is located just south of San Diego, not far from the Tijuana border. This got me to wondering what Chula means. According to SpanishDict.com it means "wench." Here is the full definition:

chula[choo’-lah]
noun
1. Woman from the back streets, low-class woman. (f)
2. Loud wench, flashy female; brassy girl (charra). (f)
3. girlfriend. (Ante Meridian & Latin American) (m)
noun
1. Punster, jester, merry-andrew. (m & f)
2. An artful, sly, and deceitful person. (m & f)
3. A funny person. (m & f)
4. Butcher’s mate or assistant. (m & f)
5. Bullfighter’s assistant. (m & f)
6. (m & f)
verb
7. PÍCARO.
8. Smart, attractive (aspecto).
9. Proud, jaunty, swaggering.
Con el sombrero a lo chulo -> with his hat at a rakish angle
Iba muy chulo -> he walked with a swagger
10. Brilliant, super.
11. Villain, rascal.
Chulo de putas -> pimp, pander

So, does Chula Vista means "view of the wench"? I'm always up for looking at wenches. According to other sites, Chula Vista means roughly beautiful view. My pocket dictionary says chula means show-off or smashing. Could these just be smoothing over the real meaning? It has been known to happen before. I won't say what the Grand Tetons means.

Clearly we need to shed some light on this word.

Ejemplo time.

Este lugar es demasiado aburrido. ¿Dónde puedo encontrar una chula para pasar un buen rato? = This place is too boring. Where can I find a wench to have a good time?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 2nd, 2012 at 8:40:06 AM permalink



Well, these restaurants clearly aren't using the word to mean woman from the back streets


----------------------------------
There is an obsolete English word quean
(archaic) A woman; female person, considered without regard to qualities or position: hence generally in a slighting use.
(archaic) An impudent woman; a prostitute

& another English word queen
A female monarch. Example: Queen Victoria
The wife or widow of a king. Example: Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother

Somehow, both these words have come together to mean an effeminate male homosexual in common slang.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
April 2nd, 2012 at 8:40:12 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Paco just recommended a restaurant to me in Chula Vista, California. CV is located just south of San Diego, not far from the Tijuana border. This got me to wondering what Chula means. According to SpanishDict.com it means "wench." Here is the full definition:



I move you ditch that dictionary and try this one:

http://www.merriam-webster.com

Just click on the Spanish-English tab in the search box. The definitions it provides, though shorter, are more ina greement with bothw aht I know and what the DRAE says.

Quote:

Chulo de putas -> pimp, pander



That si ain common use, but it's slang. The "proper" word for pimp is "Proxeneta," which no doubt derives from ancient Greek and Latin.

Quote:

So, does Chula Vista means "view of the wench"?



No. it means "nice view," or "pretty view,2 as you also noted. A related name, which is common in Mexico, is "linda vista." It's so common you often find it as one word "lindavista"


Quote:

Este lugar es demasiado aburrido. ¿Dónde puedo encontrar una chula para pasar un buen rato? = This place is too boring. Where can I find a wench to have a good time?



Assuming the meaning is right, the sentence is perfectly constructed. Nice work.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
April 2nd, 2012 at 9:07:02 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The "proper" word for pimp is "Proxeneta," which no doubt derives from ancient Greek and Latin.

the sentence is perfectly constructed. Nice work.



In English to procure, from Old French procurer, from Late Latin procurare has had the meaning of procuring women for over 4 centuries. I assume the Spanish word is related.

The archaic word in English is whoremonger since pimp at the time was a French word which originally meant to dress gaudily. Sometimes Shakespeare refers to a fishmonger which is meant to be a joke as the clueless character doesn't understand the context.

POLONIUS: How does my good Lord Hamlet?
HAMLET: Well, God-a-mercy.
POLONIUS: Do you know me, my lord?
HAMLET: Excellent well; you are a fishmonger.
POLONIUS: Not I, my lord.
HAMLET: Then I would you were so honest a man.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
April 2nd, 2012 at 9:59:25 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

it means "nice view," or "pretty view,2 as you also noted. A related name, which is common in Mexico, is "linda vista." It's so common you often find it as one word "lindavista".



Thanks. Okay, I'll try to give up SpanishDict.com, but it won't be easy. I'm very familiar with navigating the site. Webster's has a lot of ads and doesn't seem to have full conjugations of Spanish verbs.

Lindo/a is not often seen in place/business names north of the border. The Lindo Michoacan restaurant in Las Vegas is an exception. My tutor used to like to use the word. Anytime I showed her a picture of a baby, or anything women typically like, she would say "Que linda!" I wonder if that is where the English name Linda comes from.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

  • Jump to: