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Nareed
Nareed
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March 26th, 2012 at 4:32:22 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That doesn't sound so bad.



"..so hard OF remove" doens't strike you as being so bad? My teacher laughed so hard he had a coughing fit! :)

Quote:

You also get credit for using "hard," which is a mas difícil word than difícil.



I don't quite get that. I mean, the harder word there would be "difficult," wouldn't it?


Quote:

Thanks, as always for your help. I may not say it every day, but I am always very grateful for it.



If I dind't know that I wouldn't keep posting. Oh, granted I tend to insert snide comments and to amuse myself in other ways as well, but I wouldn't post just for that reason. But of course you're welcome and it's nice of you to say so once and again.
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Wizard
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March 26th, 2012 at 5:12:35 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"..so hard OF remove" doens't strike you as being so bad? My teacher laughed so hard he had a coughing fit! :)



I think that was rude of your teacher to laugh, and it doesn't strike me as funny but an honest preposition misunderstanding.

Quote: Nareed

I don't quite get that. I mean, the harder word there would be "difficult," wouldn't it?



Difficult has a pretty clear meaning, but "hard" can mean both a reference to texture as well as the level of difficulty. Probably other meanings too.

It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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March 26th, 2012 at 6:49:37 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I think that was rude of your teacher to laugh, and it doesn't strike me as funny but an honest preposition misunderstanding.



Oh, he was like that. Mistakes in pronunciation and prepositions made him smile. I didn't mind, because I'm a bit like that, too.

Quote:

Difficult has a pretty clear meaning, but "hard" can mean both a reference to texture as well as the level of difficulty. Probably other meanings too.



Maybe. But it gets used more.
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pacomartin
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March 26th, 2012 at 9:23:40 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Maybe. But it gets used more.



Yes, but "difficult" has only a single meaning in English, and it has the almost identical cognate "difícil" in Spanish. So you would consider it the first word that would come to mind.

The word "hard" means "solid, firm, not soft," also "severe, rigorous, cruel," and "difficult to do". It does get used more, but that's just because it has multiple definitions.

These are only a fraction of the uses and phrases:
hard-hearted (1100s)"obdurate, unfeeling"
harden (c.1200) make hard
hard (c.1200) "bold, daring, fearless"
hardship(c.1200) “quality of being hard,"
hardship(c.1300s) “disadvantage, suffering, privation”
hard-head (1510) “dull person”
hard-headed (1580s) “stubborn”
hard up (1610s) nautical term about steering
hard up (1821) "short of money"
hard and fast (1680s) nautical ship on shore
hard times (1705) "period of poverty"
hard money (1706) is specie, as opposed to paper
hard-bitten (1715) "tough" , originally of dogs
hard-boiled (1723) in reference to eggs
hardheaded (1779) “practical”
hard liquor (1879),
hard facts (1887)
hard-boiled (1886) "severe, tough"
hard on (1893) "penile erection"
hard-nosed (1927) "stubborn,"
hard hat (1935) "derby hat;"
hardcore (1936) Original use seems to be among economists and sociologists. Extension to pornography is attested by 1966
hard news (1938)
hard to get (1945)
hard drugs (1955)
hard-line (1958)
hard hat (1953) "safety helmet"
hard-liner (1963)
hard copy (1964)
hard rock (1967)
hard disk (1978)

===================
Just as an aside, I've noticed many groups of words where English uses one Latin word, but pairs it with a bib-Latin word

difícil - fácil : Spanish
difficult - easy : English
dif- ("reverse of") +‎ facilis (“easy”) : Latin

We do have the English word facile but in English it means simplistic or superficial (but not simple)
Spanish uses the word simplista to mean English: simplistic
Wizard
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Wizard
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March 26th, 2012 at 9:50:27 PM permalink
Fecha: 27 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: atiborrar


Today's SWD means to stuff full.

A question for the advanced readers is what the "ati" prefix means, and does the word have the same root as borrar, which means to erase? It would seem that atiborrar is much the opposite of borrar, but I don't recall ati being used to negate a word before.

Ejemplo time.

Después de me atiborré esta semana aumenté 14 libras. = After I stuffed myself this week I gained 14 pounds.
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pacomartin
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March 26th, 2012 at 11:13:38 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to stuff full.

A question for the advanced readers is what the "ati" prefix means, and does the word have the same root as borrar, which means to erase? It would seem that atiborrar is much the opposite of borrar, but I don't recall ati being used to negate a word before.

Ejemplo time.
Después de me atiborré esta semana aumenté 14 libras. = After I stuffed myself this week I gained 14 pounds.



From the DRAE 'ati' is short for atibar.

There is nothing in these definitions about stuffing yourself with food. I am not sure if that is correct.

Quote: DRAE

atiborrar (De atibar y borra).
1. tr. Llenar algo de borra, apretándolo de suerte que quede repleto.
2. tr. Henchir con exceso algo, llenarlo forzando su capacidad.
3. tr. Atestar de algo un lugar, especialmente de cosas inútiles.
4. tr. Llenar la cabeza de lecturas, ideas, etc. U. t. c. prnl.
5. tr. coloq. Atracar de comida. U. m. c. prnl.

atibar (Del latin stipāre, estibar, con cambio de pref.).
1. tr. Ingen. Rellenar con zafras, tierra o escombros las excavaciones de una mina que no conviene dejar abierta.

borra (Del latin burra).
1. f. Cordera de un año.
2. f. Parte más grosera o corta de la lana.
3. f. Pelo de cabra de que se rellenan las pelotas, cojines y otras cosas.
4. f. Pelo que el tundidor saca del paño con la tijera.
5. f. Pelusa que sale de la cápsula del algodón.
6. f. Pelusa polvorienta que se forma y reúne en los bolsillos, entre los muebles y sobre las alfombras cuando se retarda la limpieza de ellos.
7. f. Tributo sobre el ganado, que consiste en pagar, de cierto número de cabezas, una.
8. f. Hez o sedimento espeso que forman la tinta, el aceite, etc.
9. f. coloq. Cosas, expresiones y palabras inútiles y sin sustancia. ¿acaso es ~?

Nareed
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March 27th, 2012 at 5:22:39 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to stuff full.



Of something.

That should be implicit, but it's not. You have to specify what you stuffed full of.

Quote:

A question for the advanced readers is what the "ati" prefix means, and does the word have the same root as borrar, which means to erase?



None that I know of.

Quote:

Después de me atiborré esta semana aumenté 14 libras. = After I stuffed myself this week I gained 14 pounds.



"Después de QUE me atiborré DE COMIDA..."

The rest is ok. Instead of saying "comida" you can name a specific food, too. It doesn't matter much.
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Wizard
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March 27th, 2012 at 7:35:14 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Después de QUE me atiborré DE COMIDA..."



Y muchas bebidas de alcohol.
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Nareed
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March 27th, 2012 at 7:37:26 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Y muchas bebidas de alcohol.



Estás dando un ejemplo demasiado específico :)
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Wizard
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March 27th, 2012 at 10:50:40 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Estás dando un ejemplo demasiado específico :)



It's not my example. Perhaps you're not following HB's weight loss challenge.

Fecha: 28 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: indumentaria


Today's SWD means clothing. How is it different from ropa, you might ask. I think ropa applies more to casual clothing, and indumentaria applies more to something you would wear that has a particular purpose. Perhaps "attire"or "costume" would be closer in meaning. Then again, atuendo also means attire, so I really don't know what sets indumentaria apart. Another word, to add to the confusion, is traje which means suit, including such things as a wet suit or space suit. I'll leave it to the advanced readers to explain it better.

Ejemplo time.

Como siempre, vestí demasiado mucho para la fiesta. Me sentía ridículo en mi indumentaria. = As usual, I overdressed for the party. I felt ridiculous in my attire.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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