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pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 19th, 2012 at 10:15:31 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The primary definition of esturpro is rape of a minor. I'm more interested in a general term.



Sorry, that wasn't in the dictionary I looked at. The DRAE is even more confusing, as the verb can be confused with the noun for a site where you plant Violets.

violación- Acción y efecto de violar.

violar.(Del lat. violāre).
1. tr. Infringir o quebrantar una ley, un tratado, un precepto, una promesa, etc.
2. tr. Tener acceso carnal con alguien en contra de su voluntad o cuando se halla privado de sentido o discernimiento.
3. tr. Profanar un lugar sagrado, ejecutando en él ciertos actos determinados por el derecho canónico.
4. tr. Ajar o deslucir algo.

violar(De viola).
1. m. Sitio plantado de violetas.


The Latin wore rapere was used for "sexual violation," but only very rarely; the usual Latin word being stuprum, literally "disgrace."

Sense of "sexual violation or ravishing of a woman" first recorded in English as a noun, late 15c. The verb in this sense is from 1570s. Rapist is from 1883.
Nareed
Nareed
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March 19th, 2012 at 10:27:54 AM permalink
"Estupro" is a legal term for statutory rape.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 19th, 2012 at 10:56:10 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Estupro" is a legal term for statutory rape.




Latin rapio has descendants:
French: ravir
Italian: rapire
Romanian: răpi
English: rape, rapture, ravish

For some reason the word didn't produce a Spanish descendant. It's interesting how some of the Latin language was lost in the various Romance languages.

Latin stuprum has descendants
French: stupre
Italian: stupro
Portuguese: estupro
Spanish: estupro
Catalan: estupre

but nothing in English.
Wizard
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Wizard
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March 19th, 2012 at 4:32:21 PM permalink
Sorry to change the topic, but I wrote a review of the movie La Casa de mi Padre yesterday. I'm not sure if nobody noticed or nobody cared.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
teddys
teddys
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March 19th, 2012 at 4:43:08 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Sorry to change the topic, but I wrote a review of the movie La Casa de mi Padre yesterday. I'm not sure if nobody noticed or nobody cared.

You should have posted it on the thread about the movie.

Good review, by the way.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
FrGamble
FrGamble
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March 19th, 2012 at 9:04:13 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for dropping by Padre. At the risk of going off topic, who do you confess to, and do you give communion to yourself? Does being bilingual help in job advancement in your field? I hear the pope, and past popes, could speak several languages.



At the risk of going off topic I will answer. It is essential for every priest to have a spiritual director and/or confessor. I think if you are a Catholic taking seriously your spiritual growth and relationship with Christ you should go to Confession every month for sure. Sometimes I wish the old confessing in a mirror trick worked. Si, the priest at Mass is able to give Communion to himself.

YES, being bilingual helps tremendously. I don't know about job advancement, but if you look at job advancement as caring for more souls, then specificaly speaking Spanish is a huge blessing. I feel like we should make it mandatory for all seminarians to learn Spanish. I heard someone in conversation say recently that the Church has grown in South and Central America some 7000%. I know Italian and would love to change it into Spanish, but I too do not have the gift for languages. Alas, I am stuck only able to say: Yo quiero Taco Bell.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 20th, 2012 at 6:13:58 AM permalink
Quote: FrGamble

I know Italian and would love to change it into Spanish, but I too do not have the gift for languages.



I talked to a priest who was a native Italian Speaker who was sent to run the parish in Little Italy in San Diego in the late 1970's. He said that it was fairly easy for him to learn Spanish as the demographics changed.
Wizard
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Wizard
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March 20th, 2012 at 6:46:56 AM permalink
I thought Italian and Spanish were like brothers when it comes to languages. Anyway...new day.

Fecha: 20 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: motosierra


Today's SWD means chain saw. I had to check the dictionary when I saw this the other day, thinking that motosierra should mean "motor mountains," but sure enough the dictionary says it means chain saw. Reminds me of the word for roller coaster, Montañia Russo.

A question for the advanced readers is ¿por qué? What does a chain saw have to do with mountains? Maybe the chain looks like a jagged mountain range if you look at it closely. However, I'm not big on looking at chain saws two inches from the chain, for fear somebody will turn it on in my face.

Ejemplo time

No soy muy bueno con las motosierras. Es porque tengo tantos muchos dedos les faltar. = I am not very good with chain saws. That is why I have so many missing fingers.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 20th, 2012 at 7:32:18 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is ¿por qué? What does a chain saw have to do with mountains? Maybe the chain looks like a jagged mountain range if you look at it closely. However, I'm not big on looking at chain saws two inches from the chain, for fear somebody will turn it on in my face.

Ejemplo time

No soy muy bueno con las motosierras. Es porque tengo tantos muchos dedos les faltar. = I am not very good with chain saws. That is why I have so many missing fingers.



Sierra is more like serrated, and is Spanish for a saw. Jagged mountains are said to look like the teeth in a saw.

While your translation is literal, I think that you need a verb. "I'm no good at cutting with a chainsaw." English is a little more forgiving than Spanish (the verb is understood).

No soy muy bueno para cortar con las motosierras.
Wizard
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Wizard
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March 20th, 2012 at 7:59:06 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Sierra is more like serrated, and is Spanish for a saw. Jagged mountains are said to look like the teeth in a saw.



Thanks, I didn't know that. Here is a picture of Mount Whitney, which is in the Sierra Nevada mountains.


Source: http://www.whitneyzone.com/wc_notes.htm

They certainly do look jagged. I hope to climb Mount Whitney again this summer, if I win a trail permit in the lottery.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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