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pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 15th, 2012 at 10:57:25 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

For what it is worth SpanishDict.com has an example not having to do with debt: "la pelea se saldó con once heridos -> eleven people were injured in the brawl"



The DRAE definition has other definitions.
The first definition one reads more like the profit or loss on an account. The second sounds like a legal definition. The 3rd and 4th definition sounds more like English "sale". The 5th is the settlement of you debt.

Actually none of these definitions are equivalent to the English word "solid".

saldo. (Del it. saldo, y este del lat. solĭdus, sólido).
1. m. Cantidad positiva o negativa que resulta de una cuenta.
2. m. Resultado final favorable o desfavorable, al dar por terminado un asunto.
3. m. Resto de mercancías que el fabricante o el comerciante venden a bajo precio para despacharlas pronto.
4. m. Venta de mercancías a bajo precio. Mañana empiezan los saldos.
5. m. p. us. Pago o finiquito de deuda u obligación.


Question for Nareed. How would you refer to a "balanced diet"? Would it be "alimentación equilibrada" or "dieta balanceada"?
Nareed
Nareed
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March 15th, 2012 at 11:15:43 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed will have to correct me if I am wrong, but from the dictionary definition, Spanish uses balance in the sense of balancing books, balancing on a trapeze, balancing a ship, and balancing options in business. Spanish does not use the word in the English sense of a balanced diet or a balanced lifestyle (where balance is a synonym for equilibrium).



You are wrong. "Balance" does apply to equilibrium. "Saldo" does not. To your other question, it's "dieta balanceada."

What is a balanced lifestyle anyway?
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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March 16th, 2012 at 4:12:39 AM permalink
Sorry to change the topic again, but it is a new day.

Fecha: 16 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: chupa-chup


Today's SWD means lollipop. Some sources don't hyphenate it. Other related forms of candy are chupete y pirulí, for which I trust Paco can produce pictures to show us the difference between them and a chupa-chup.

A question for the advanced readers is what is the etymology, or story behind, the chupa-chup.

Ejemplo time.

¿Cuantos lames se necesitan para llegar al centro de un chupa-chup? = How many licks does it take to get to the center of a lollipop?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Doc
Doc
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March 16th, 2012 at 6:02:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is what is the etymology, or story behind, the chupa-chup.

I'm certainly not advanced at all in Spanish, but my silly guess would be that "chupa-chup" represents the sound of slurping on a sucker.
WongBo
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March 16th, 2012 at 6:09:36 AM permalink
Not sure which came first, the word or the brand...perhaps it is akin to the use of "kleenex" for a tissue?
Or "xerox" for a photocopy?

CHUPA CHUPS
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.
Doc
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March 16th, 2012 at 7:07:16 AM permalink
Quote: WongBo

CHUPA CHUPS

Quote: from WongBo's link

The name of the brand comes from the Spanish verb chupar, meaning "to suck".


I still vote that the word is based on the sound -- "chup, chup, chup, chup ...." ;-)
Nareed
Nareed
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March 16th, 2012 at 7:28:51 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Sorry to change the topic again, but it is a new day.



Is that why the Sun keeps coming up? ;)

Quote:

Today's SWD means lollipop.



I'm 101% sure it's a brand name for a lollipop, ratehr than the wrod for lollipop itself. It may have substituted the word, as was noted happened with Kleenex, not to mention Coke, but it's not a word as such. Further, if it has become the term for lollipop, it hasn't done so in Mexico. it strikes me as a South american term, too.

The actual word for lollipop is "paleta." That's also the word for a popsicle and any kind of small paddle. More specifically, if you like, you can say "paleta de caramelo." Despite simialrities to an English word, "caramelo" means bot "candy" and "caramel." A popsicle would be "paleta helada." Ice cream on a stick is "paleta de helado."

Quote:

Other related forms of candy are chupete y pirulí,



"Chupete" is a South American word. I think it also means pacifier. "Pirulí" is a kind of candy on a stick. it's shaped like a cone and usually has several different colors. it can be regular hard candy like a lollipop, or a kind of softer, gooey candy.


Quote:

¿Cuantos lames se necesitan para llegar al centro de un chupa-chup? = How many licks does it take to get to the center of a lollipop?



¿Cuantos lamidos....?"

"Lames" means "you lick;" "lamido" means "lick," "lamidos" means "licks"
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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March 16th, 2012 at 8:00:58 AM permalink
The source where I found chupa-chup used it as a translation of lollipop.

Quote: Nareed

Is that why the Sun keeps coming up? ;)



The sun doesn't come up. I'd prefer, "Is that why the earth keeps rotating?"

Quote:

¿Cuantos lamidos....?"

"Lames" means "you lick;" "lamido" means "lick," "lamidos" means "licks"



I struggled with the word for the noun lick. There was some other verb/noun pair I used as an example, but can't remember which. I wish there were one simple rule for turning a verb into a noun in Spanish.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 16th, 2012 at 8:29:49 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I wish there were one simple rule for turning a verb into a noun in Spanish.



The rules for converting verbs into nouns in English are not simple either. For example, look at this English as a Second Language quiz. How would you explain the "rules" in English to a non-native speaker.

Put a noun in the empty space, based on the verb in parenthesis
His ___ to understand the problem surprised me. (fail)
His ___ to do the work irked the boss. (refuse)
They do not have free ___ . (deliver)
The ___ was widely reported on TV. (rob)
Don't do it without any ___ . (prepare)
The manager decided to send in his ___ yesterday. (resign)
Nobody likes to work under ___ . (press)
He considered my ___ unfair. (decide)
Do you know what caused his ___ ? (dismiss)
His ___ caused us a lot of trouble. (omit)
When is his ___ with the doctor? (appoint)
It was not our ___ to hurt your feelings. (intend)
The ___ in this room is very old-fashioned. (furnish)
Don't listen to him. He is a ___ . (lie)
Their ___ for power lasted a long time. (struggle)
============

In the last example, you use the exact same word.
Nareed
Nareed
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March 16th, 2012 at 8:41:33 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The source where I found chupa-chup used it as a translation of lollipop.



I believe you. But I've still enver heard one person say "chupa chup" when referring to a lollipop. And it si a brand name. In Mexico lots of things are refered to by a brand name. Kleenex, for example. Refrigerated trucks are called "Thermo Kings," even if the refrigeration unit is Carrier or some other brand. Powdered chicken broth is called Knorr Suiza, too. But a lollipop is a paleta.


Quote:

I struggled with the word for the noun lick. There was some other verb/noun pair I used as an example, but can't remember which. I wish there were one simple rule for turning a verb into a noun in Spanish.



Sorry. Like all other skills, languages need to be practiced.

How about this: I'm going to be in Vegas several days (for practical purposes from may 7th to the 17th), and I won't be sightseeing or gambling every minute of the day. if you like we can conduct a few sessions, say a couple of hours each, or maybe more, and I'll do my best to answer your questions. We can conduct the whole thing in Spanish, too, which ought to help. I'll even set a very reasonable rate. We can settle the details by PM. We can easily squeeze in 5 such sessions, depending on your schedule.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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