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Doc
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March 13th, 2012 at 12:55:40 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

... was a very loyal listener to the Dr. Demento show for parts of the seventies and eighties, which played a similar kind of musical humor and parodies, much of it by Weird Al Yankovic.


I have never listened to Dr. Demento, but I understand that one of my favorite comedy musicians, Carla Ulbrich, is a regular performer there. Carla is the writer and performer of such classics as, "If I Had the Copyright on the Word 'F**k'."

She has lots of other absurd songs. She had a long series of debilitating health issues and made fun of them all in song. She now regularly appears at seminars and such helping folks to deal with their serious health issues in part with similar you-can't-get-me-down attitudes, in addition to performing more conventional music gigs.

Since I got this discussion off topic: La comedia y la música son muy divertidos.
Nareed
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March 13th, 2012 at 1:20:36 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for your forgiveness. However, I'm not good at forgiving myself so will do another SWD for today.



As you wish. We can talk about your need to beat yourself up in out next sesison ;)

Quote:

Today's SWD means meatball. This is a nice word that seems to have one meaning only, and no synonym.



Yes. But it's worth noting "meatloaf" can be translated as "albondigón;" which actually means a "a very big meatball." It's also woth noting spaghetti and meatballs is not a popular dish down here. Italian restaurants serve spaghetti bolognesa, which has loose ground beef and tomato sauce. You do find it with ematballs at Sbarro, a fast food franchise.

You may also want to look up the word "alhóndiga," which means something completely different (I'm unsure on the spelling, too)

Quote:

A question for the advanced readers is whether albóndiga has a slang component as well.



None.

Quote:

Encima de macarrón a la italiana,
Todo cubrió en queso,
Perdí mi albóndiga pobre,
Cuando alguien estornudó.
=



Oy vey!

"Encima deL espagueti,
Todo cubierto de queso,
Perdí mi pobre albóndiga,
Cuando alguién estornudó."

Briefly "albóndiga pobre," would indicate the meatball is poor. "Pobre albóndiga" means you're sorry for what ahppened to the meatball.
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pacomartin
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March 13th, 2012 at 6:13:22 PM permalink
Wizard, Nareed has made the same correction several times now.

Look at the Wikipedia section on participles.

The critical sentence in the article is: In Spanish the past participle is used generally as an adjective meaning a finished action and it is variable in gender and number in these uses.
The past participle has other than just as an adjective (discussed in the article).

Infinitive: to cover : cubrir
Present Participle: covering : cubriendo
Past Participle: covered : cubierto

In English weak (or regular) verbs use the same ending for both the past participle, as for the past (preterite in Spanish). The ending is a simple ed. But they are different grammatical uses. In Spanish whenever you want an adjective you must use the "past participle".

In this case it isan adjective since you are essentially referring to covered spaghetti.
If you "covered the spaghetti so that the flies couldn't get to it", that would be a verb in the past tense.


Quote: online


On top Of spaghetti
ARRIBA DEL ESPAGETI
All covered with cheese
TODO CUEBIERTO CON QUESO
I lost my poor meatball
PERDI MI POBRE ALBONDIGA
When somebody sneezed
CUANDO ALGUIEN ESTORNUDÓ

It rolled off the table
RODÓ FUERA DE LA MESA
And on to the floor
Y CAYÓ AL SUELO
And then my poor meatball
Y ENTONCES MI POBRE ALBONDIGA
Rolled out of the door
RODÓ HASTA LA PUERTA

It rolled in the garden
RODO EN EL JARDIN
And under a bush
Y BAJO UN ARBUSTO
And then my poor meatball
Y ENTONCES MI POBRE ALBÓNDIGA
Was nothing but mush
NO FUE NADA MÁS QUE MASA BLANDA

The mush was as tasty
LA MASA ERA TAN SABROSA
As tasty could be
COMO PODRÍA SER
And early next summer
Y AL PRINCIPIO DEL PROXIMO VERANO
It grew into a tree
SE CONVIRTIÓ EN UN ARBOL

The tree was all covered
eL ARBOL ESTABA TODO CUBIERTO
With beautiful moss
DE UN BONITO MUSGO
It grew lovely meatballs
DIÓ ALBONDIGAS MARAVILLOSAS
And tomato sause
Y SALSA DE TOMATE

So if you eat spaghetti
ASÍ QUE SI COMEIS SPAGHETTI
All covered with cheese
CUBIERTOS DE QUESO
Hold on to your meatball
AGARRAD VUESTRAS ALBONDIGAS
And don't ever sneeze
Y NUNCA ESTORNUDEIS

Wizard
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Wizard
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March 13th, 2012 at 6:40:09 PM permalink
Yeah, I know I should have used the past participle. I owe 20 push-ups for that one. With that I'm at the point where my brain knows it, but sometimes the information doesn't make it to my fingertips.

Pregutas:

1. Why "hasta" for "out" in "Rolled out of the door"? I thought hasta meant "until."
2. Why principio for "early" in "Y AL PRINCIPIO DEL PROXIMO VERANO." I thought principio meant beginning. For "next" is would have used proximo.
3. Why convirtió for "grew" in "SE CONVIRTIÓ EN UN ARBOL"? I would have used crecer.
4. Same question with dió for "grew" in "DIÓ ALBONDIGAS MARAVILLOSAS".
5. Why AGARRAD for "hold onto" in "AGARRAD VUESTRAS ALBONDIGAS". I would have used coger.
6. Why is CUBIERTOS plural in "CUBIERTOS DE QUESO." Are you suggesting that "SPAGHETTI" is plural. I would argue it is singular. When I order spaghetti in a restaurant I don't as for spaghettis.

Finally, spanishdict.com says the translation for spaghetti is

espaguetis or Macarrón a la italiana. I see Nareed went with espaguetis, which argues your point for making CUBIERTOS plural, I must admit.
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Nareed
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March 13th, 2012 at 7:12:16 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

5. Why AGARRAD for "hold onto" in "AGARRAD VUESTRAS ALBONDIGAS". I would have used coger.



I'll get back to the rest later. for now, when you're in Mexico, DON'T EVER USE THAT WORD!

I mean it ;)
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pacomartin
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March 13th, 2012 at 7:50:58 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I'll get back to the rest later. for now, when you're in Mexico, DON'T EVER USE THAT WORD! I mean it ;)


It's vulgar in Argentina also. But not in Spain.

coger.(Del lat. colligĕre).
1. tr. Asir, agarrar o tomar. U. t. c. prnl.
2. tr. Recibir en sí algo. La tierra no ha cogido bastante agua
3. tr. Recoger o recolectar algo. Coger la ropa, el trigo
4. tr. Tener capacidad o hueco para contener cierta cantidad de cosas. Esta tinaja coge treinta arrobas de vino
5. tr. Hallar, encontrar. Me cogió descuidado Procura cogerle de buen humor
6. tr. Descubrir un engaño, penetrar un secreto, sorprender a alguien en un descuido.
7. tr. Captar una emisión de radio o televisión.
8. tr. Tomar u ocupar un sitio u otra cosa. Están las butacas cogidas
9. tr. Sobrevenir, sorprender. Me cogió la hora, la noche, la tempestad
10. tr. Alcanzar a quien va delante.
11. tr. Incorporarse a algo que ya ha empezado. Cogió el curso a la mitad
12. tr. Tomar, prender, apresar.
13. tr. Tomar, recibir o adquirir algo. Coger velocidad Coger fuerzas Coger una costumbre Coger unas entradas de teatro
14. tr. Entender, comprender. No he cogido el chiste
15. tr. Aprender algo. Ha cogido enseguida el acento
16. tr. Tomar por escrito lo que otra persona va hablando. El taquígrafo coge 120 palabras
17. tr. Escoger, elegir. Cogió tales asignaturas opcionales
18. tr. pillar (‖ aprisionar con daño). La puerta le cogió un dedo. U. t. c. prnl.
19. tr. Dicho de un toro: Herir o enganchar a alguien con los cuernos.
20. tr. Dicho de un vehículo: Atropellar a alguien.
21. tr. Montarse en un vehículo. Ha cogido el avión
22. tr. Dicho del macho de determinadas especies: Cubrir a la hembra.
23. tr. coloq. Ocupar cierto espacio. La alfombra coge toda la sala
24. tr. coloq. Contratar o alquilar.
25. tr. coloq. Contraer ciertas enfermedades o empezar a padecer ciertos estados físicos o anímicos. Cogió una pulmonía Cogió una rabieta
26. tr. ant. acoger (‖ servir de refugio).
27. intr. Dicho de una cosa: Encontrarse en determinada situación respecto a alguien. Tu casa me coge de camino Eso coge muy lejos
28. intr. Encaminarse, tomar una dirección.
29. intr. coloq. tomar (‖ resolverse o determinarse). Cogió y se fue
30. intr. vulg. caber. Esto no coge aquí
31. intr. vulg. Am. Realizar el acto sexual.
32. intr. ant. acogerse.
Nareed
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March 13th, 2012 at 8:49:39 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I owe 20 push-ups for that one.



We seriously should talk about that ;)


Quote:

Pregutas:

1. Why "hasta" for "out" in "Rolled out of the door"? I thought hasta meant "until."



That's what it means. "out the door" doesn't translate well. "hasta afuera" would be better than "hasta la puerta," but still not right, as it implies it rolled outside and stopped a short distance then. So I's use "rodó hacia afuera" or "rodó para afuera."


Quote:

2. Why principio for "early" in "Y AL PRINCIPIO DEL PROXIMO VERANO." I thought principio meant beginning. For "next" is would have used proximo.



"Early" as in times or epochs doesn't translate (I need a macro for that, don't I?) If you want to say (need a macro for that one, too, but I digress) "in the early 80s," you'd say "a principios de los ochenta." So "early next summer" would be "a principios del siguiente verano."

Quote:

3. Why convirtió for "grew" in "SE CONVIRTIÓ EN UN ARBOL"? I would have used crecer.



Later. I need to think this through.

Quote:

4. Same question with dió for "grew" in "DIÓ ALBONDIGAS MARAVILLOSAS".



Same answer.

Quote:

5. Why AGARRAD for "hold onto" in "AGARRAD VUESTRAS ALBONDIGAS". I would have used coger.



Because in some places they still talk that way. I'd translate "hold on to" as "agarren bien."

Quote:

6. Why is CUBIERTOS plural in "CUBIERTOS DE QUESO." Are you suggesting that "SPAGHETTI" is plural. I would argue it is singular. When I order spaghetti in a restaurant I don't as for spaghettis.



I've seen "espaguetis" used. It's wrong. Or it should be. In Mexico no one says "espaguetis." It's sold either s "espagueti" or "Spagueti."
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Wizard
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March 14th, 2012 at 8:11:11 AM permalink
Fecha: 3.14
Palabra: Cifra


¡Feliz día del pi todos! Today is the day we celebrate not just pi, but math in general. Although I prefer e to pi, I still like to pay tribute to a number that is not just key to mathematics, but life in general. The more one studies math, the more one realizes how pi and e are at the core of everything. So, let's take a moment today to pay our due respect and rejoice in the wonder and joy that is mathematics!

Our guest speaker in the SWD today is Stan Tenen, trying to explain how the Torah may be a cipher for pi. This brings up today's SWD, which means cipher, code, or total.

Ejemplo time.

Mi investigación para desenlazar la cifra de el Torá esta yendo ningún lugar. = My research to unlock the Torah cipher is going nowhere.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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March 14th, 2012 at 8:37:06 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Our guest speaker in the SWD today is Stan Tenen, trying to explain how the Torah may be a cipher for pi.



I greatly respect how much the pursuit of describing e and pi has influenced the development of mathematics, but that video sounds like pseudo intellectual religious babble.
Nareed
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March 14th, 2012 at 2:32:12 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

¡Feliz día del pi todos!



"Feliz día de Pi A todos"

"Cifra" can mean code, but it is most often used to mean "figure," "amount" or "number." For example:

"Ella gana hasta seis cifras" = "She amkes up to six figures"

"Es una cifra muy alta." = "That's a very high price."

"¿Cual es al tércera cifra de 3141592?" = "Whats' the third number of 3141592?"

The word used for cipher or code is "código." But not always. Morse code is known as "clave Morse." Trivia, the company WalMart bought out, which owned several supermarkets and restaurants in Mexico, was called "Grupo Cifra." No, I don't know why they used that name.

Quote:

Ejemplo time.

Mi investigación para desenlazar la cifra de el Torá esta yendo ningún lugar. = My research to unlock the Torah cipher is going nowhere.



"Desenlazar" is the wrong word. Truly, I don't think it's even a verb. On the other hand, "unlock" doesn't have an exact translation. I'd use "descifrar" which means to decipher. And I don't even want to talk about "going nowhere." So:

"Mi investigación para descifrar el código de LA Torá no va a ningún lado." the alst part is awkward, though. I'd say instead "..no ha dado resultados," or "no ha funcionado" or "no ha dado fruto."
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