Thread Rating:

Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
March 10th, 2012 at 4:53:30 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means laborious, distressing, or embarrassing.



Not quite on the last. It applies to people and it means "shy" or "timid." The rest is ok.

Quote:

A question for the advanced readers is whether it is related to penar, which means to punish/suffer.



Yes. That's how you get difficult and laborious.

Quote:

Los vídeos de apostar de El Mago son sencillamente penoso. = The Wizard's gambling videos are simply embarrassing.



The word you want is "vergonzosos." Meaning they cause embarrassment. And I remind you it's your term, not mine :)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard 
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23425
March 10th, 2012 at 5:23:53 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Not quite on the last. It applies to people and it means "shy" or "timid." The rest is ok.



I got the "embarrassing" from http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/penoso. I picked it up from a translation of the word awful.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
March 10th, 2012 at 6:15:50 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I got the "embarrassing" from http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/penoso. I picked it up from a translation of the word awful.



It does mean that, sort of, but it's not used that way. For example, if something embarrasses you or you're shy about doing something, you'd say "me da pena hacer..." or "tengo pena de hacer..." You don't say "hacer X es penoso."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
WongBo
WongBo
Joined: Feb 3, 2012
  • Threads: 62
  • Posts: 2126
March 10th, 2012 at 6:35:51 PM permalink
When you are discussing usage, are you specifically discussing colloquial Mexican Spanish?
It seems to me that there are many different Spanish dialects throughout Latin America that differ from each other
As well as Spanish as it is spoken in various parts of Spain which also has some regional differences.
Just curious...
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard 
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23425
March 10th, 2012 at 7:16:30 PM permalink
Quote: WongBo

When you are discussing usage, are you specifically discussing colloquial Mexican Spanish?



This issue has come up many times. Nareed, of course, speaks from the Mexican Spanish perspective. I am trying to learn from various sources. For a while my tutor from Argentina had a heavy influence on this thread, but those days are over. I tend to choose my words from books I read that are Spanish translations of English books. It seems to me that such translations tend to based on Spanish Spanish.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
March 10th, 2012 at 9:36:08 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I think the word has colloquial meanings that would make your sentence misunderstood. The word also means cute or handsome in a youthful sort of way (i.e. not ruggedly handsome). In Mexico and Cuba it has a regional meaning of "timid".
...
Related to embarrassing is the adjective "shy". This photo is labelled morza penosa or presumably "shy walrus".
...



I don't understand these images. It is not clear if it is the colloquial meaning or the peninsular meaning. The second image seems to be a joke.



Quote: WongBo

When you are discussing usage, are you specifically discussing colloquial Mexican Spanish?
It seems to me that there are many different Spanish dialects throughout Latin America that differ from each other
As well as Spanish as it is spoken in various parts of Spain which also has some regional differences.
Just curious...



In the greater NYC area, most of the Spanish speakers are from Central America or Puerto Rico. My relatives all speak Castillian. We try and highlight different regional meanings. As Nareed is the only native language speaker who regularly comments, we get the Mexico City viewpoint.

I spent 6 months in Oaxaca, which is where the largest percentage of the 68 native American languages spoken in Mexico are used. Some of the accents were fairly unique, as many people are speaking Spanish as a second language.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
March 11th, 2012 at 9:17:50 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I don't understand these images.



I don't either.

To an earlier question, I understand colloquialism to mean slang. If so, then no I'm not using Mexican slang. But I use the laguage as it's used here. I know some expression from other countries, and from other parts of Mexico, but not enough to come up with examples for everything the Wizard comes up with.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
March 11th, 2012 at 11:45:56 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

To an earlier question, I understand colloquialism to mean slang. If so, then no I'm not using Mexican slang. But I use the laguage as it's used here.



Most linguists do not equate colloquialism and slang.

If the word means "timid" by nearly everyone in the population of Mexico, it is colloquial (even if it is not understood to mean the same thing in Spain or Argentina). If it is only understood to have that meaning by a subgroup (usually young, but could be an ethnic group), then it is considered to be "slang".

I called the definition "colloquial" because it is listed that way in the DRAE.

When discussing the magic tricks I use the term mark to refer to the person who is the intended target of a trick. while the dictionary calls that "slang" I think of it more as a colloquialism, since nearly everyone of all ages knows what I mean.

The word Mark is also a name given to the coolest, funniest, most popular, and most enjoyable males in the world. To me that is "slang" because most people don't know that definition unless you are young and urban.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard 
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23425
March 11th, 2012 at 5:57:28 PM permalink
Fecha: 11 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: pila


Today's SWD means battery, as in the kind that supplies electricity.

This should not be confused with batería, which is still means battery, but the kind meaning a lot of something. For example, the doctor ordered a batería of tests.

A question for the advanced readers, perhaps in science, is what is the difference between a battery and a pile (as in voltaic pile), and is the Spanish pila related to the English pile.

Ejemplo time.

My cajon está lleno de pilas de tipo C, pero no tengo nada para los poner adentro. = My drawer is full of type C batteries, but I have nothing to put them in.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
March 11th, 2012 at 8:57:19 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

My cajon está lleno de pilas de tipo C, pero no tengo nada para los poner adentro. = My drawer is full of type C batteries, but I have nothing to put them in.



"..de pilas tipo C, pero no tengo nada en que ponerlas."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

  • Jump to: