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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 21st, 2012 at 10:28:24 AM permalink
¿Pero qué significa esto? ¿Quienes son ustedes?

I think the photographer is talking to whoever is breaking down the door.
buzzpaff
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February 21st, 2012 at 10:37:50 AM permalink
Betty Page : " I was never the girl next door." I might add, unless the girl next door was 36-23-35.
Nareed
Nareed
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February 21st, 2012 at 8:03:52 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I believe pleonastic (noun); pleonastic (adjective); and pleonastically (adverb); are all English words, but not pleonasmic. In any case the word is technical, and seldom used.



Good. That means I coined a new word :P

Quote:

ha de ser == is to be



My bad. Long work days, long electrology sessions that leave me half-dead...

Quote:

The phrase "fallas de origen" == "failures of origin" seems to be used in television broadcasts.



It came from there. In many office jobs it means the end result was wrong because the input or source material was wrong.

Quote:

Tu comentarios estaban cargados de sarcasmo.



And here I thought I was just kidding!
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 21st, 2012 at 9:25:38 PM permalink


La reina de las curvas y otras pioneras del erotismo de papel

Maybe Betty will help get people to tune into the SWD thread.
Wizard
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Wizard
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February 21st, 2012 at 10:44:32 PM permalink
Fecha: 22 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: mezclar


Today's SWD means to mix.

A question for the advanced readers is whether there is a connection to the liquor Mezcal. Perhaps it was meant to be mixed in with other stuff to make cocktails. Although, on my trips to San Felipe in my younger days we would just drink it straight from the bottle. We didn't even bother with a glass. I never got up the nerve to eat the worm.

Ejemplo time

¿Cuantos dar la moza de cócteles como una propina por una bebida mezclada? = How much should I tip the cocktail waitress for a mixed drink?

p.s. I have another idiom question: Si por mí fuera,.... That best I can do is "If for my outside..."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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February 22nd, 2012 at 5:55:13 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

p.s. I have another idiom question: Si por mí fuera,.... That best I can do is "If for my outside..."



If it were up to me.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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February 22nd, 2012 at 6:41:24 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

If it were up to me.



Can you expand on that? Where does the fuera come into play?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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February 22nd, 2012 at 12:57:51 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is whether there is a connection to the liquor Mezcal.



I don't know, but I very much doubt it. Mezcal is an indigenous liquor, like tequila or pulque, and its name is likely derived from some pre-hispanic term.

Quote:

Perhaps it was meant to be mixed in with other stuff to make cocktails. Although, on my trips to San Felipe in my younger days we would just drink it straight from the bottle. We didn't even bother with a glass. I never got up the nerve to eat the worm.



I can't help you there. I've never had mezcal (or pulque, either; I have tried tequila).

Quote:

¿Cuantos dar la moza de cócteles como una propina por una bebida mezclada? = How much should I tip the cocktail waitress for a mixed drink?



We should seriously explore the possibility of a bilingual comedy routine :)

Literal retranslation: "How manys to give the cocktail girl as a tip for a mixed drink?"

Ok. What you probably didn't know is that in regualr Spanish there is no specific term used for "cocktail waitress." You just say "mesera." "Moza" is a rather archaic term and it means "girl." The male form, "mozo" means what you'd expect, but it also applies, sometimes, to male waiters and janitors.

Anyway: ¿Cuanto le debo dar de propina a la mesera por una bebida mezclada?"

I don't get the mixed drink. Do you tip more for a mixed drink than, say, a shot of whiskey?

Quote:

p.s. I have another idiom question: Si por mí fuera,.... That best I can do is "If for my outside..."



"if it were up to me," or "if it depended on me," or "if I had any say in the matter."

As to your latter question (no need to inflate post counts on this thread, yes?), you're using a conditional (si=if) and some tense of the verb "estar." Granted I missed such use recently, but not this time. So "if it were up to me," is a good, literal translation.The other options are not literal, btu they mean the same thing.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 22nd, 2012 at 1:29:46 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Can you expand on that? Where does the fuera come into play?


afuera == outside
fuera == imperfect subjunctive of verb "ser" (either first or third person)

If you look at a standard conjugation of "to be" in English, you tend to think of present and past (see table). But there is also the subjunctive mood in phrases such as "If I were you". The verb tense is not past tense, but rather a "speculative" statement. In English we use the past tense of the verb, but in Spanish (and all other Romance languages) they have special sets of endings.

In this particular case the verb differs from the adjective for "outside" by the single letter "a".

Infinitive: be
Present Participle:   being
Past participle: been
Person,Number    Present     Past
1st,singular I am was
2nd,singular you are were
3rd,singular he/she/it     is was
1st,plural we are were
2nd,plural you are were
3rd,plural they are were
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 22nd, 2012 at 1:41:30 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is whether there is a connection to the liquor Mezcal. Perhaps it was meant to be mixed in with other stuff to make cocktails. Although, on my trips to San Felipe in my younger days we would just drink it straight from the bottle. We didn't even bother with a glass. I never got up the nerve to eat the worm.



They are "false friends". One word is from Latin, the other is from the Aztec language.

mezclar=from Vulgar Latin: misculare
mezcal=from Aztec (Nahuatl): metl (maguey (agave)) + ixcalli (stew).

I think they can both be spelled with an 's' instead of a 'z'

Mezcal and pulque are made from the same plant as tequila (agave), but by entirely different processes. The leaving the worm in the bottom of Mezcal was first done in the 1930's as a marketing strategy. They are so pickled that they are virtually tasteless. The phrase is "con gusano". Some people believe it gives a better taste. Tequila is never made "con gusano", only Mezcal. Pulque is a poor man's drink, cheap and powerful and with a wicked hangover.

It is a dead giveaway that you are ignorant of Mexican liquors if you talk about tequila with a worm.

Abiding by your request not to have photos of alternative food:


Mesclar is a cognate with Mestizo, the typical Latin American name for the mix of European and Indigenous peoples. Mexico has by far the largest percentage of Mestizo population, with over 2 out of 3 people being Mestizo.

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