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Wizard
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Wizard
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February 15th, 2012 at 6:44:13 AM permalink
Quote: mrjjj

It would be kind of nice if the (ummm) Spanish speaking people here in the U.S., had an English word of the day....just sayin.



Judging from your posts, I think you could stand to join the English classes with them. To use the above as an example:

(ummm) I won't even get into that.
Spanish-speaking should have a hyphen. The general rule is if you have two adjectives modifying the same noun you hyphenate them.
No comma after U.S.
Sayin should either have an apostrophe for the missing g or the g itself. Furthermore why do you need to add that clause? Of course that is what you're saying, you wrote it.
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Nareed
Nareed
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February 15th, 2012 at 6:57:29 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

If I may change the topic, how would you translate this sentence, "No decían que andaban mal de dinero?"



Didn't they say they had money troubles?


Quote:

And another, "Vamos a tirar la casa por la ventana."



That's slang for "We're going to throw a very expensive, very fancy party."

The literal translation is "We're going to throw the house out of the window," which makes no logical sense (isn't the window a part of the house?) The exact translation is "We're throwing the contents of the house out the window," which does make logical sense, but is otherwise meaningless absent some context to justify the action, right? But slang expressions are like that.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 15th, 2012 at 11:10:36 AM permalink
Quote: mrjjj

It would be kind of nice if the (ummm) Spanish speaking people here in the U.S., had an English word of the day....just sayin.


So far Nareed is the only native language Spanish speaker who regularly contributes, and she is already fluent in standard English. You are free to start a "vernacular English" thread.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 15th, 2012 at 11:50:55 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That's slang for "We're going to throw a very expensive, very fancy party."



Is the phrase echar la casa por la ventana more or less common?

The verb echar has no direct cognates in English, so the verb used to translate it varies a lot. Almost every phrase below uses a different English verb.


echar un vistazo a (to glance at)
echar de menos a alguien (to miss someone)
echar abajo (to pull down)
echar la llave (to lock)
echar el freno (to put the brakes on)
echar a perder (to ruin or demolish)
echarse atrás (to back out)
echarse un novio (to get oneself a boyfriend)
echar ganas (to put forth much effort)
echar a suertes (to make a decision by random means such as tossing a coin or drawing straws)
echar el alto (to order someone to stop)
echar un ojo (to watch or look at)
echar balones fuera (to sidetrack)
echar las campanas al vuelo (to shout out the news)
echar el cierre (to close or shut down)
echar algo en falta (to miss something)
echar la buenaventura (to tell a fortune)
echar la vista atrás (to look back)
echar por tierra (to ruin or spoil)
echar una siesta (to take a nap or siesta)
echar sapos y culebras (to rant and rave)
echar una mirada (to take a look)
echar sal (to salt)
echar en saco roto (to do something in vain)
echar el resto (to go for broke)
echar un pulso (to challenge someone, to armwrestle)
echar pestes de alguien (to run somebody down)
echar una película (to show a film)
echar la primera papilla (to vomit)
echar una mano, echar un capote (to help out, give a hand)
echar leña al fuego (to add fuel to the fire)
echar el guante a alguien (to catch somebody)
echar una cana al aire (to let one's hair down)
echar una cabezada (to nap)
echar chispas (to give off sparks, to rant)
echar una bronca a alguien (to tell off someone)
echar agua al vino, echar agua a la leche (to water down)

We do say "throw your strategy out the window" or "throw the rules out the window" in English, but we are just as likely to say "throw caution to the wind". An old fashioned way to say you are going to spare no expense is to say you will "pull out all the stops" in a reference to "stops" in an old pipe organ.

Nareed
Nareed
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February 15th, 2012 at 12:56:18 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Is the phrase echar la casa por la ventana more or less common?



I'm not entirely sure what the exact wording is.

Quote:

The verb echar has no direct cognates in English, so the verb used to translate it varies a lot. Almost every phrase below uses a different English verb.



It means "to throw." It's used a lot in slang expresisons, however, and thus acquires different meanings.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
mrjjj
mrjjj
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February 15th, 2012 at 5:31:10 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Judging from your posts, I think you could stand to join the English classes with them. To use the above as an example:

(ummm) I won't even get into that.
Spanish-speaking should have a hyphen. The general rule is if you have two adjectives modifying the same noun you hyphenate them.
No comma after U.S.
Sayin should either have an apostrophe for the missing g or the g itself. Furthermore why do you need to add that clause? Of course that is what you're saying, you wrote it.



I stand by my statement 100%. It always cracks me up....if you correct misspellings etc., somehow the message will change. (lol)

Its like saying....you misspelled 'the', therefore, your POINT is voided out.

Ken
Wizard
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Wizard
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February 15th, 2012 at 6:03:27 PM permalink
Thanks for the help with those phrases.

"No decían que andaban mal de dinero?" = Didn't they say they had money troubles?

I thought andar meant walk. Is the gist of the expression that without money you don't walk well, perhaps because you're not dressed well, or have any place important to walk to?

Regarding echar, that has got to be one of the most difficult words to translate from Spanish to English. It almost can't be defined by itself, you have to see what phrase it is in. Whenever I encounter it in a book I grit my teeth.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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February 15th, 2012 at 6:29:28 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for the help with those phrases.



You're welcome.

Quote:

I thought andar meant walk.



Yes, but you can't use the literal meaning for slang expressions. If you ask someone "what's up?" you're not literally asking what is positioned on top or above something else. In this case "andaban" comes to mean "estaban." You can also say "las cosas andan mal," meaning "things are going badly." That's closer to the original meaning, but it does not mean "things are walking badly."

So if you want a closer translation to the literal meaning of "andar," try: Didn't they say their finances were going badly?
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Wizard
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Wizard
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February 15th, 2012 at 6:57:13 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

If you ask someone "what's up?" you're not literally asking what is positioned on top or above something else.



Point taken. I think "up" must have all kinds of usages. Same with "run." With idiomatic "up" expressions, they all seem to have to do with a state of things. Like "dress up" or "catch up." Pasar comes to my mind, if forced to make a Spanish comparison.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 15th, 2012 at 10:26:37 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Point taken. I think "up" must have all kinds of usages. Same with "run." With idiomatic "up" expressions, they all seem to have to do with a state of things. Like "dress up" or "catch up." Pasar comes to my mind, if forced to make a Spanish comparison.



How did Google do?

English Spanish (Google)
Give up renunciar
Stuck up Stuck up
Shut up callar
Up themselves Hasta ellos mismos
Thought up / think up Pensamiento arriba / pensar en
Put up poner
Upstairs arriba
Once upon a time Había una vez
Look up the number Busque el número
Giving me the head's up Darme la cabeza de
I won't put up with this No voy a tolerar esto
I'm fed up Estoy harto
I've had it up to here Lo he tenido hasta aquí
What's up with him anyway? ¿Qué pasa con él de todos modos?
What's he up to? ¿Qué se trae entre manos?
He's obviously a bit uppity today Obviamente es un poco arrogante de hoy
What's up? ¿Qué pasa?
Life has its ups and downs La vida tiene sus altibajos
I'm trying to get up in the world Estoy tratando de conseguir en el mundo
Listen up Escuchen
Back up Realice copias de seguridad
Turn up aparecer
Summon up Convocar a
Bring up criar
Knock up pelotear
Call up llamar
Dig up desenterrar
Ease up Afloja
Follow up Seguimiento
Dry up secarse
Camp it up Campamento para arriba
Took up tomó
Sop up absorber
Sell up Venta por
Soften up ablandar
Size up Tamaño de hasta
Slow up retardar
Seven Up (!!) Seven Up (¡!)
Tie up atar
Tails up colas de hasta
Type up escriba a máquina
Shore up apuntalar
Team up Forme un equipo
Tune up poner a punto
Tool up Herramienta de hasta
Sex up Sexo por
Stitch up coser
Stock up Almacene
Stoke up Nunca añada
Soup up sobrealimentar
Tape up cinta de
Buy up comprar
Eye up Ojo por
Fry up Freír hasta
Pry up levante
Pile up amontonarse
Pipe up Tubo de hasta
Rile up rile hasta
Times up Tiempo hasta
Take up tomar
Tear up arrancar
Warm up calentar
Jump up Salta hacia arriba
Send it up Envíalo a
Lift up levantar
Move up subir
Offer up ofrecer
Paste up pegar
Pull up levantar
Roll up Enrolle
Suck up aspirar
Bottoms up ¡apurar las copas
Wake up despertarse
Went up subió
Wise up caer en la cuenta
Wind up acabar
Get the wind up Encogerse a uno el ombligo
Zip up Comprime
Tidy up poner en orden
Clean up limpiar
Mess up estropear
Get your spirits up Obtener el ánimo
Throw up vomitar
Pass up dejar pasar
Get up levantarse
Come up subir
Speak up Habla
Heat up calentar

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