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Wizard
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Wizard
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February 8th, 2012 at 7:05:42 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I'm not sure. Have you looked up the dictionary in Spanish?



I don't have a Spanish dictionary in Spanish, just several English/Spanish ones. A pure Spanish dictionary is not easy to find in Vegas.

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I'd also use "ver" rather than "mirar." The latter has a connotation of looking intently or staring.



I was surprised to get this correction. As Paco said, I think of ver as to see and mirar as to look. So, I probably am "looking intently," although trying to be discrete about it.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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February 8th, 2012 at 7:28:20 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I don't have a Spanish dictionary in Spanish, just several English/Spanish ones. A pure Spanish dictionary is not easy to find in Vegas.



As easy as clicking on this link:

http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/

Quote:

I was surprised to get this correction. As Paco said, I think of ver as to see and mirar as to look. So, I probably am "looking intently," although trying to be discrete about it.



It may be local usage <shrug>. For a while in Mexico a boy would casually refer to his girlfriend as "mi vieja," as did a man to his wife. A Spaniard I knew once said he imagined all these men talking about very elderly women. "Vieja" does mean"old woman."
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Wizard
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Wizard
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February 8th, 2012 at 7:44:43 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It may be local usage <shrug>. For a while in Mexico a boy would casually refer to his girlfriend as "mi vieja," as did a man to his wife. A Spaniard I knew once said he imagined all these men talking about very elderly women. "Vieja" does mean"old woman."



Here a husband will often refer to his wife as "my old lady," even if she isn't old. I take this means that he is already getting henpecked, as tends to happen after a long time married. The expression seems to be getting old; I don't hear as much as I used to.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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February 8th, 2012 at 8:27:43 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

http://buscon.rae.es/draeI/ For a while in Mexico a boy would casually refer to his girlfriend as "mi vieja," as did a man to his wife. A Spaniard I knew once said he imagined all these men talking about very elderly women. "Vieja" does mean"old woman."



The DRAE includes this colloquial usage of the term. So it is not completely old fashioned.
vieja - coloq. México : Mujer en general, incluso joven.


Speaking of young women, American TV debuted a show produced by Steven Spielberg, The River, starring a young actress from Mexico city, PAULINA GAITAN. And she speaks Spanish the entire time (with subtitles). No star one has ever consistently spoken Spanish on prime time TV.

In real life she is going to be age 20 this month, but on the TV show she plays a young teenager.
Wizard
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February 8th, 2012 at 8:34:43 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

No star one has ever consistently spoken Spanish on prime time TV.



What about the guy dressed like a bee on the Simpsons?
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pacomartin
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February 8th, 2012 at 8:55:06 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

What about the guy dressed like a bee on the Simpsons?



Yaritza Burgos is the star of a Spanish-language television sitcom on "Channel Ocho", but he can speak English if he thinks it will get him a better job.


Quote: Wizard

Here a husband will often refer to his wife as "my old lady," even if she isn't old. The expression seems to be getting old; I don't hear as much as I used to.


According to the Oxford English Dictionary this first use of "old lady" to refer to a man's young wife was in 1599. So that really is an old expression.
Wizard
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February 8th, 2012 at 10:53:18 PM permalink
We may have discussed this before, and correct me if I'm wrong, but there doesn't seem to be a word for billion in Spanish. Don't you think there should be? Why not just billones? In speaking about such things as government spending, or the wealth of Bill Gates, you really need the word billion. Yes, you can always say mil milliones, but doesn't it get redundant? With the enormous inflation Argentina has been known to go through, a billion pesos might have been quite achievable.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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February 9th, 2012 at 1:00:22 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

We may have discussed this before, and correct me if I'm wrong, but there doesn't seem to be a word for billion in Spanish. Don't you think there should be? Why not just billones? In speaking about such things as government spending, or the wealth of Bill Gates, you really need the word billion. Yes, you can always say mil milliones, but doesn't it get redundant? With the enormous inflation Argentina has been known to go through, a billion pesos might have been quite achievable.



They do have the word billón, it just refers to what we call a trillion. What is customarily called the "long scale" is to multiply by a million before adding the prefixes in English bi, tri, quad, quint, .... The "short scale" is to multiply by a thousand. The standard in Europe was the "long scale" except in a few places. It first appeared in America in 1729, and has remained the standard here. Even Britain, prior to 1974, used billion for what in America meant "trillion".

The pre-1974 former British English word billion, post-1961 current French word billion, post-1994 current Italian word bilione, German Billion; Dutch biljoen; Swedish biljon; Finnish biljoona; Danish billion; Spanish billón and the European Portuguese word bilião (with an alternate spelling to the Brazilian Portuguese variant) all refer to 10^12, being long-scale terms. Therefore, each of these words translates to the American English or post-1974 modern British English word: trillion (1012 in the short scale).

Given the importance of the USA to the world economy, most journalists simply try to avoid using the term altogether. They will simply say 23 thousand million so that there is no ambiguity. The IMF lists the GDP of Spain a equivalent to $1 409 946 millions of US dollars on a nominal basis. We might says $1.4 trillion.

Mexico's GDP is $1 658 197 millions of US dollars on a purchasing power basis.
Nareed
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February 9th, 2012 at 7:21:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

We may have discussed this before, and correct me if I'm wrong, but there doesn't seem to be a word for billion in Spanish. Don't you think there should be? Why not just billones? In speaking about such things as government spending, or the wealth of Bill Gates, you really need the word billion. Yes, you can always say mil milliones, but doesn't it get redundant?



It's not redundant. One thousand million dollars, say, is as valid, but not as economical, as saying one billion dollars. In the paper you see headlines like "Gastan 31 MMP." Which means "31 mil millones de pesos." But headlines are always compressed when possible.

The way I think, I do use billion in the American sense of a "one thousand million." It kind of makes better sense when considering large numbers, and it provides some economy in writing. But then in everyday use, one rarely gets much chance to say either "billion" or "trillion."

Quote:

With the enormous inflation Argentina has been known to go through, a billion pesos might have been quite achievable.



How high did denominations go? Mexico had a much milder case of hyperinflation, with notes topping off at 50,000 pesos, I think.
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Wizard
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February 9th, 2012 at 8:08:38 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

How high did denominations go? Mexico had a much milder case of hyperinflation, with notes topping off at 50,000 pesos, I think.



When I was there I think I saw a 1,000,000 peso bill from a prior version of the peso at an antique store in the San Telmo neighborhood. What they did, to avoid having too many zeros, was to introduce different types of pesos. They might say that 1,000 of peso X would equal one peso Y. They went through several of such peso upgrades. I'm sure YoRoll11 can speak to this much better than I can.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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