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Doc
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February 3rd, 2012 at 7:31:11 PM permalink
Have you never made ice cream from snow?
Wizard
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Wizard
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February 3rd, 2012 at 9:19:49 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

A place that sells ice cream is known as a "Nevería"



In Argentina they called them a heladaría.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 3rd, 2012 at 10:05:10 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Yes. But nieve also means ice cream, specifically sorbet or other non-milk, non-cream types. A place that sells ice cream is known as a "Nevería"


When you go into a shop, one group of buckets is called helados, and another group is called nieves.

Helados are rich and creamy and more like most American ice cream, nieves are a water-based "sherbet style" that are slightly different than anything I've seen in the USA. They come in many more flavors beyond the traditional berries.
Some examples are
cactus and
tres leches
leche quemada (burnt milk);
guayaba or guava
ciruela pasa (milk based natural prune with a whole dried prune inside)
beso oaxaqueño is rose petal;
mamey is an unusual tropical fruit which tastes like pumpkin pie
tuna is prickly pear (not to be confused with atun, or tuna)

Nieves are not "sno cones" which they call raspados which only small children seem to eat.

Paletas are popsicles which also come in more flavors and varieties than you would see in the USA.


Typical store in Oaxaca, but the chain is named after Michoacan (another Mexican state)
Wizard
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February 3rd, 2012 at 11:23:26 PM permalink
Fecha: 4 de Febrero, 2012
Palabra: Morder


Today's SWD means to bite. A related word is mordisquear, which means to nibble.

A question for the advanced readers is whether in general you can tack on a quear to the end of other verbs, as a diminutive form?

Ejemplo time

Me duelen las dientes, por tanto sólo mordisqueó mi helado. = My teeth hurt, so I only nibbled at my ice cream.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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February 4th, 2012 at 4:47:09 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

When you go into a shop, one group of buckets is called helados, and another group is called nieves.



Often, yes. almost always. But I stand by my translation. "What flavor ice cream do you want?" Makes more sense as a sardonic reply than "What flavor sorbet do you want?"

Quote:

leche quemada (burnt milk);



Goat milk. It's called "cajeta" and it's very good. But it's not made with cow milk

Quote:

Paletas are popsicles which also come in more flavors and varieties than you would see in the USA.



Paleta also means lollipop. In a place that serves cabrito, it's the rib section of the baby goat.

Quote:

Typical store in Oaxaca, but the chain is named after Michoacan (another Mexican state)



Oh, that's nearly universal. Lots of these stores are called "La Michoacana." BTW, if you've never tried it, you should ask for grosella next time.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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February 4th, 2012 at 4:56:40 AM permalink
Speaking of Spanish idioms, I've wondered for about 25 years about what they were talking about in Don't Cry for Me Argentina with these:

Quote:

Although she's dressed up to the nines
At sixes and sevens with you

It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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February 4th, 2012 at 6:12:49 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Me duelen las dientes, por tanto sólo mordisqueó mi helado. = My teeth hurt, so I only nibbled at my ice cream.



My teeth hurt, therefore he/she/it only nibbled on my ice cream?

This s a tough one, and you'll find two variations in pronunciation. The word you want is "mordisqueé" but most people will pronounce it mordisquié" Not that many people will think to use it. besides, you don't bite ice cream to begin with.

trivia: "mordida" is mexican slang for a bribe, commonly one given to a cop.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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February 4th, 2012 at 9:00:12 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Although she's dressed up to the nines
At sixes and sevens with you



I've heard that question a lot. For some reason the line sticks with a lot of people who hear the music.

No one has been able to prove definitively where all the nine sayings come from. "Cloud 9", "The whole 9 yards", and "Dressed to the 9's". Since most of the sayings are very old, they all may be using the number 9 as a stand-in for "a lot". Presumption is that a bolt of cloth was 9 yards. Dressed to the 9's are variously attributed to 9 feet of fabric used to make the clothing, to 9 button boots, or to a 9 button tunic. None of the theories is definitive.

The 6's and 7's quote is as old as "Middle English". In Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde (1374) the line:

Lat nat this wrechched wo thyn herte gnawe, But manly set the world on sexe and seuene. = Original Middle English
Let not this wretched woe gnaw at your heart, But manly set the world on six and seven. = Modern English Translation

The implication is that the phrase implies that you shake up the world. One theory is that there was a dice game whose rules have been lost, where there was a high risk bet on a six and seven.

Of course, the lyrics of the musical Evita implies that being at six's and seven's is to be much lower class than being at the nine's . I don't think Andrew Lloyd Webber has ever revealed exactly what he meant by that line.
Wizard
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February 4th, 2012 at 10:48:09 PM permalink
Fecha: 5 de Febrero, 2012
Palabaras: patriota, gigante


In honor of the Super Bowl we have two SWDs today. Pretty obvious cognates, I won't bother to define them.

Patriota seems to imply a female patriot to me. Do both male and female patriots share that word? If so, why?

I'm uneasy about gigante meaning an extremely larger person, like the Jolly Green Giant. The examples I found seemed to me along the lines of "a giant in business." If it truly mean giants, in the biblical sense, is gigante the correct word? To answer my own question I did some research:

Quote: Genesis 6:4 (KJV)

There were giants on the earth in those days, and also afterward, when the sons of God came in to the daughters of men and they bore children to them. Those were the mighty men who were of old, men of renown.



Quote: Genesis 6:4 (NIV translation)

Al unirse los hijos de Dios con las hijas de los seres humanos y tener hijos con ellas, nacieron gigantes, que fueron los famosos héroes de antaño. A partir de entonces hubo gigantes en la tierra.



A bit off topic, but why haven't archeologists ever found any bones from these giants that used to walk the earth?

Ejemplo time

Espero que los Gigantes ganar, así que puede guardar tu alma. = I hope the Giants win, so I can keep your soul.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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February 5th, 2012 at 6:00:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Patriota seems to imply a female patriot to me. Do both male and female patriots share that word?



Yes.

Quote:

If so, why?



Because? :)

Quote:

If I truly mean giants, in the biblical sense, is gigante the correct word? To answer my own question I did some research:



Yes.

Check this link, it should carry the Superbowl on the cover all day: http://www.cancha.com/Defaultr.htm


Quote:

Espero que los Gigantes ganar, así que puede guardar tu alma. = I hope the Giants win, so I can keep your soul.



That's all wrong:

Espero que ganen los Gigantes, para que así puedA conservar tu alma.

To which I say: ¿Y tu nieve de que sabor? ;)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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