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Face
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Face
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January 20th, 2012 at 6:37:30 PM permalink
It's pronounced "razberry", no "P".

Unless you're talking to a 3 year old, then they're "razpees" or "blazpees", depending if they're red or black, with the "p" pronounced. So says my little guy =)
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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January 20th, 2012 at 7:30:48 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Speaking of the word raspberry, is the p silent, or am I just lazy in not pronouncing it?



Cases when the silent P is used in English.

(1) Occasionally, as when preceding a syllable beginning with its voiced equivalent b, the sound of p is assimilated, so effectively becoming silent, as in cupboard (‘cubberd’), raspberry (‘razb(e)ry’).

(2) When a word starts with "p" if the word is of Greek derivation before n (pneumonia), s (psalm), t (pterodactyl),
psalm, psalter, pseudo-, psittacosis, psoriasis, psyche, Ptolemy, ptomaine, etc.

(3) The p in receipt should logically be inserted in the words conceit and deceit. They are English variants of the same root Latin word:
recipere = "to receive"
concipere = "to conceive"
decipere = "to deceive"

But when Samuel Johnson's published A Dictionary of the English Language in 1755; it had a far-reaching effect on Modern English. For some reason he left out the silent p in conceit and deceit and it has remained standard spelling ever since.

(4) Silent p occurs in sapphire. MIDDLE ENGLISH spelled it "safir", but it is from a Greek word "sappheiros" meaning "blue stone". The silent p was restored to make it closer to the original Greek.

(5) French loans as corps and coup.
Doc
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January 20th, 2012 at 8:57:55 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Cases when the silent P is used in English....


Is everyone thinking of the same old joke, or is it just me?
pacomartin
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January 20th, 2012 at 9:21:49 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

Is everyone thinking of the same old joke, or is it just me?


Doc
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January 20th, 2012 at 9:50:42 PM permalink
As the expression goes, "Great minds think alike."

Actually, I was thinking of the comment about the spelling/pronunciation of "pneumonia": the p is silent, as in swimming.
Wizard
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Wizard 
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January 21st, 2012 at 6:50:12 AM permalink
Fecha: 21 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: Acaso


Today's SWD means "perhaps." Yes, another one. Add it to the list, along with tal vez and quizás. Of the three I seem to run across tal vez by far the most, although it seems interchangeable with quizas. Acaso seems pretty rare.

A question for the advanced readers would be if there are subtle differences between the three words.

Ejemplo time

Acaso veo una pelicula hoy, si puedo salir trabajo temprano. = Perhaps I will see a movie today, if I can leave work early.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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January 21st, 2012 at 7:57:08 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Acaso



Acaso from <<de caso>> which might be translated as "perhaps", but it means literally "in case" .
Quizá translated as "perhaps" first and also "maybe"
"tal vez" translated as "perhaps" or "maybe", but more literally "equal time".
Wizard
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Wizard 
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January 21st, 2012 at 8:09:50 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Quizá translated as "perhaps" first and also "maybe".



What is the difference between "perhaps" and "maybe"?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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January 21st, 2012 at 8:36:29 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

What is the difference between "perhaps" and "maybe"?



"May be" used it be said "It may be". Or it is possible that "it exists".

"Perhaps" is short for "by chance" . In addition "haps" is the plural of an old word "hap" meaning "chance". It implies that several different chance events need to occur (i.e. a kind of serendipity).

Even though they have different etymologies, most people consider them to be synonyms today. The word "perhaps" is considered slightly more formal, and most often used in British English and in American English.
Nareed
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January 21st, 2012 at 4:24:55 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard


Today's SWD means "perhaps." Yes, another one. Add it to the list, along with tal vez and quizás. Of the three I seem to run across tal vez by far the most, although it seems interchangeable with quizas. Acaso seems pretty rare.



That's because the dictionary definition is jumbled and mostly worthless. Look it up in the Real Academia. I did. I can't tell you what it means based on that.

Quote:

A question for the advanced readers would be if there are subtle differences between the three words.



Yes, that would be a good question ;)

Ejemplo time

Quote:

Acaso veo una pelicula hoy, si puedo salir trabajo temprano. = Perhaps I will see a movie today, if I can leave work early.



I think that's right. Except the second part, where it should definitely read "DEL trabajo." Alternatively you could say "salir de trabajar."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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