Thread Rating:

pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
January 9th, 2012 at 8:25:26 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Mi mayordomo estaba durmiendo en el trabajo ayer. = My butler was sleeping on the job yesterday.




You have an extra r.

In English you use "was sleeping" to indicate ongoing actions in the past, but in Spanish you usually use the imperfect past tense (which doesn't really exist in English).
Mi mayordomo dormía en el trabajo de ayer.

While your sentence is correct, I don't think it is common to use the progressive past tense. Nareed should confirm.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
January 9th, 2012 at 9:29:49 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

In English you use "was sleeping" to indicate ongoing actions in the past, but in Spanish you usually use the imperfect past tense (which doesn't really exist in English).



Perhaps I was trying to imply that that my butler often sleeps on the job, but this time I caught him in the act.

I'd be interested to hear how Nareed would interpret the sentence both ways.

German word of the day: Bürgermeister

Today we get a bonus German word, which is one of my favorites. Bürgermeister = mayor.

Ejemplo time

Wo ist der Bürgermeister? = Where is the mayor?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
January 9th, 2012 at 11:37:31 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

While your sentence is correct, I don't think it is common to use the progressive past tense. Nareed should confirm.



Is that like a lateral pass? ;)

There's nothing wrong with the Wizard's sentence. It's fully valid.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
January 9th, 2012 at 12:04:02 PM permalink
How would you translate these three sentences?

1) Mi mayordomo estaba durmiendo en el trabajo ayer.
2) Mi mayordomo dormía en el trabajo ayer.
3) Mi mayordomo durmió en el trabajo ayer.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
January 9th, 2012 at 3:41:35 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

How would you translate these three sentences?



Easily? :)

Quote:

1) Mi mayordomo estaba durmiendo en el trabajo ayer.



My butler was sleeping at work yesterday


Quote:

2) Mi mayordomo dormía en el trabajo ayer.



My butler slept at work yesterday or My butler was sleeping at work yesterday

Quote:

3) Mi mayordomo durmió en el trabajo ayer.



My butler slept at work yesterday

But English being what it is, I'd say "My butler fell asleep while at work yesterday."

Did you ever post in any Star Trek boards? You'd have been a hit (I say this as a compliment).
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
January 9th, 2012 at 10:47:15 PM permalink
Fecha: 10 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: Ya


Any Spanish to English dictionary will say that ya means "already." However, I seem to see it a lot more in Spanish than I see "already" in English. It seems to me that ya is often used to add emphasis that something is happening. In those cases, perhaps "now" would be a better translation.

The following is an example from Ramona empieza el curso.

Quote: English

We all know you have musical shoes.



Quote: Spanish

Ya nos hemos dado cuenta de que tienes zapatos musicales.

It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
January 10th, 2012 at 6:46:46 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 10 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: Ya


Any Spanish to English dictionary will say that ya means "already." However, I seem to see it a lot more in Spanish than I see "already" in English. It seems to me that ya is often used to add emphasis that something is happening. In those cases, perhaps "now" would be a better translation.



It's interesting seeing the English Spanish differences from your point of view.

"Ya" is one of those complicated words that ahve no English equivalent. Examples:

¡Ya cállate! = Shut up already!

Ya llegó el camión = The bus has arrived.

Ya nos vamos = We're leaving now, or we're ready to go.

About the alst one, we had some house guests from the US some years ago. Once they were going out with my paretns, so my dad told me" Diles que ya nos vamos." I had a hard time figuring out how to relay the message.

BTW that translation you quoted is terrible. The Spanish says "We're well aware you have musical shoes." I'd have gone with: "Sabemos que tienes zapatos musicales." But then the term "musical shoes" is rather baffling.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
January 10th, 2012 at 7:39:55 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Palabra: Ya



It's a core Indo-European word which comes down in all languages (not just Latin ones)

Ja Vol - German for "Yes Sir"
Yeah Verily - Middle English for an "Yes verray ", where "verray" is a middle English form of very meaning "true"
déjà vu - de means before , so it is a "before now" vision
Yeah - Modern English cheer
Non credo io già, che ve ne avréte a male - Italian (I do not think you will take it ill)

Derived words in English include: yup, yay, yea, aye, yea-haw, giddy-yup, uh-huh, yippee

They are all used for emphasis, or affirmation.

The word in Latin was iam
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
January 11th, 2012 at 10:45:12 PM permalink
Fecha: 12 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: empañar Empeñar


Today's word means "to insist." It can also mean to get into debt.

Ejemplo time.

Empeño me dejas pagar la propina. = I insist you let me pay the tip.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
January 12th, 2012 at 6:57:07 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 12 de Enero, 2012
Palabra: empañar


Today's word means "to insist." It can also mean to get into debt.



You make the cutest kind of misatkes sometimes :)

EmpAñar means "to fog." As when you breath on a glass and leave a layer of moisture on it.

EmpEñar does mean "to insist" and also "to pawn" which is related to debt (so it would be that specific deb, but I've never heard it sued that way), and to make an effort.

Quote:

Empaño me dejas pagar la propina. = I insist you let me pay the tip.



Aside from the misspelling, the verb "empeñar" is used transtitively or applied to other people. Examples:

"Empeñé mi relog para pagar mi tarjeta" = "I pawned my wathc to pay off my credit card."

"Se empeñó mucho en el trabajo y logró un ascenso" = "She made a big effort at work and got a promotion."

I can't quite think how to use it to mean "to insist." The usual word for that is "Insistir."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

  • Jump to: