Thread Rating:

Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
December 7th, 2011 at 9:40:40 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I got them from the Skyscraper City thread but it's not very helpful in telling me where the photo was taken from. I assume near the airport.



It says so on the file name :)

Quote:

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/7902/colnarvarteyriodelapied.jpg



Emphasis added.

That means "colonia Narvarte." Based on that I'm guessing the street going over the river is Dr. Vertiz. The diagonal avenue going to the left of it would be San Antonio and the other diagonal would be Avenida Universidad. Maybe.

As supporting evidence, there seems to be a stadium along the river. There was a baseball stadium there until a few years ago (and no, the one in the picture isn't a baseball park), right where Vertiz crosses over today's Viaducto. It's been torn down and now there's a mall called Parque Delta in its place.

Keep in mind it's late, I had a 12 hour work day and I get lost in my own room ;)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
December 8th, 2011 at 2:35:26 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That means "colonia Narvarte." Based on that I'm guessing the street going over the river is Dr. Vertiz. The diagonal avenue going to the left of it would be San Antonio and the other diagonal would be Avenida Universidad. Maybe.

As supporting evidence, there seems to be a stadium along the river. There was a baseball stadium there until a few years ago (and no, the one in the picture isn't a baseball park), right where Vertiz crosses over today's Viaducto. It's been torn down and now there's a mall called Parque Delta in its place.

Keep in mind it's late, I had a 12 hour work day and I get lost in my own room ;)



I would have never guessed. The names of individual colonia's are not on the maps I have. Looking at Google maps I have the photo about 3 blocks north of that. Avenida Universidad would be outside of the range of the photo to the left.

Street on bottom left is Bolivar

Traffic Circle is
(#1) Casa del Obrero Mundial
(#2) San Antonio
(#3) Eje Central Lazaro Cardena

Looking west on (#1) and (#2)

Viaduct Rio Piedad is on right side of photo

I see the Parque Delta shopping mall where the old baseball stadium is located. It has a Liverpool and a Cineplex.

The wikipedia article says "Parque Delta" was demolished in 1955, and replaced with "Parque del Seguro Social" which closed in 2000. That was demolished in 2003 and replaced with the shopping mall. So if we knew what the baseball stadiums looked like we could date the photo to either before or after 1955.

For everyone else

On a subway map, the traffic circle is 600 yards south of the Lazaro Cardenas stop (which is just to the right of the photo), and you are looking west between Centro Medico and Etiopia. The traffic circle in the distance in the photo now contains the Etiopia subway stop.

The photo makes that part of the city almost empty in the early '60s (late '50s?) despite being just over 2 miles from the Zocalo.

Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
December 8th, 2011 at 6:48:45 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I would have never guessed. The names of individual colonia's are not on the maps I have.



So get other maps. For example at http://www.guiaroji.com.mx

It's not the best mapping tool available, but it has the names of every neighborhood, and it shows the all the subway lines and stations as well.

Quote:

The photo makes that part of the city almost empty in the early '60s (late '50s?) despite being just over 2 miles from the Zocalo.



That's what I meant when I said it's all too flat. Lots of empty lots, too, Not many tall buildings, either, and no traffic at all.

BTW I do recall the 70s, and the viaducto was then just as it is now. So I'm guessing the river was tubed and paved over in the 60s.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
December 8th, 2011 at 7:04:15 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I'm right in this. "Caer en la cuenta" sounds too verbose and "literal" that it wouldn't be sued widely in Mexico.



Here is the passage where I got this. The English is the original, and the Spanish a translation.

English: When the rice was cooking, she slipped into the dining room to set the table and then remembered they had forgotten salad.

Spanish: Después de poner el arroz al fuego, se fue al comedor a poner la mesa y entonces cayó en la cuenta de que se les había olvidado la ensalada.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
December 8th, 2011 at 7:12:22 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Spanish: Después de poner el arroz al fuego, se fue al comedor a poner la mesa y entonces cayó en la cuenta de que se les había olvidado la ensalada.



I would say ".. y entonces se dió cuenta de que...."

It's possible in a book or a news report the phrase "cayó en cuenta" or "cayó en la cuenta" would be used. But books and news reports tend to be verbose and literal. IN every day speech, not so much.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
December 8th, 2011 at 8:30:33 AM permalink
I'm going to start a new feature in the SWD. The lindo y feo words of the day. The lindo words will be ones that sound good, that roll of the tongue naturally, that bring delight to the Spanish language. The feo words are an effort to say, don't sound natural, and leave a bad aftertaste.

Fecha: 12-8-11
Lindo: Estropear (to break)
Feo: Estómago (stomach)

Ejemplos time.

El ladrido de el perro estropeó el silencio de la noche. = The barking dog broke the silence of the night.

Eso comida no estaba de acuerdo con mi estómago. = That meal did not agree with my stomach.

Questions for the advanced readers:

How does estropear differ from romper?

In English if we don't digest a meal well we say it didn't agree with us, or our stomach. Does that idiom carry over into Spanish?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
December 8th, 2011 at 8:37:56 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I would say ".. y entonces se dió cuenta de que...."

It's possible in a book or a news report the phrase "cayó en cuenta" or "cayó en la cuenta" would be used. But books and news reports tend to be verbose and literal. IN every day speech, not so much.



How about children's books which are translated from English?


I have seen some parent's question some of the translations of her book. For instance:
"Tenía el pelo como cepillo de limpiar piso y ya había mudado los dientes" is translation for
"His hair looked like a scrubbing-brush and most of his grown-up front teeth were in". (Henry Huggins, 1950- Author Beverly Cleary)

The Spanish seems overly literal and not very poetic.
1BB
1BB
Joined: Oct 10, 2011
  • Threads: 18
  • Posts: 5339
December 8th, 2011 at 8:42:02 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I would say ".. y entonces se dió cuenta de que...."

It's possible in a book or a news report the phrase "cayó en cuenta" or "cayó en la cuenta" would be used. But books and news reports tend to be verbose and literal. IN every day speech, not so much.



After eating in a Spanish restaurant, I ask for la cuenta. Should that be dependent on the country I'm in?
Many people, especially ignorant people, want to punish you for speaking the truth. - Mahatma Ghandi
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
December 8th, 2011 at 8:59:55 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

How about children's books which are translated from English?



Yup, that is the book I'm reading, and I make no apologies. My Spanish is at about a second grade level, at best, so this is the best I can do. I have a bilingual version of Treasure Island, but it is way too hard for me. Sadly, I can't think of a more effective way to learn the language than to go through translations of children's books.

Quote: 1BB

After eating in a Spanish restaurant, I ask for la cuenta. Should that be dependent on the country I'm in?



It is also cuenta in Argentina. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it comes from contar, so the check is like a count of everything you ordered. We've also been discussing how darse cuenta means to notice, or give account of.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
December 8th, 2011 at 9:35:45 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Yup, that is the book I'm reading, and I make no apologies. My Spanish is at about a second grade level, at best, so this is the best I can do.



No apologies necessary. It is a highly recommended way to learn a language. Most second graders in a native language have a very extensive vocabulary, and most of the basic grammar.

But Beverly Clearly is 95 years old, and one of the best known writers of children's books which have been translated into 20 languages. She may not know any of them. The translators will naturally take the most literal translations possible.

"His hair looked like a scrubbing-brush and most of his grown-up front teeth were in". Original prose from Henry Huggins, 1950- Author Beverly Cleary

But look at the Spanish translation and turn it back into English
"Tenía el pelo como cepillo de limpiar piso y ya había mudado los dientes"
His hair was as a brush for cleaning floors and he had 'changed' his teeth.

Nareed: How would you translate "most of his grown-up front teeth were in"?

Esperanza Rising is an award winning book written by Pam Muñoz Ryan who grew up in California. She is not a native speaker, but she grew up hearing Spanish and has studied the language. The original book is mostly English but with some Spanish. I suspect she had a lot more input into the translation than Beverly Cleary.
But that looks more like 6th grade reading level

  • Jump to: