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pacomartin
pacomartin
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November 26th, 2011 at 9:17:25 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'd be interested to know what the yellow statue is supposed to be.



Another blogger calls it "the big yellow thing". The bright yellow metallic sculpture is by renowned Mexican artist Sebastián was dedicated in 1992. The modern statue represents the head of a horse and replaced a classical sculpture by Manuel Tolsá of Charles IV on horseback which stood there for 127 years, until 1979 when the street was altered.

Both sculptures are known as El Caballito.

Original sculpture.


The sculptor has only one work in America that I know of. It is located in San Antonio called La Antorcha de la Amistad . It was commissioned by the Asociación de Empresarios Mexicanos and was presented as a gift from the Mexican government to the City of San Antonio in 2002.
Nareed
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November 26th, 2011 at 10:39:41 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Another blogger calls it "the big yellow thing".



That's very apt.

Quote:

The bright yellow metallic sculpture is by renowned Mexican artist Sebastián



If that's a renowned sculptor, well, why?

Quote:

The modern statue represents the head of a horse



As much as this "2" represents a duck. Or maybe not quite that much....

Quote:

and replaced a classical sculpture by Manuel Tolsá of Charles IV on horseback which stood there for 127 years, until 1979 when the street was altered.



Ah, well, that does explain the name of both the building and the glorieta. Though the horse loks normal-sized, and the statue isn't exactly small. I don't see why the diminutive got used.
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pacomartin
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November 26th, 2011 at 1:18:22 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Though the horse loks normal-sized, and the statue isn't exactly small. I don't see why the diminutive got used.



The statue was the 2nd largest in the world when it was cast in 1802. I sent an e-mail to an expert on the statue since I have no idea why the diminutive was used.
Nareed
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November 26th, 2011 at 1:57:12 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The statue was the 2nd largest in the world when it was cast in 1802. I sent an e-mail to an expert on the statue since I have no idea why the diminutive was used.



There's an unfortunate, not to mention annoying, tendency among Mexicans to use diminutives. I'd say they're overused. They also make everyone sound childish <sigh>

BTW "Obra" also means a stage play.
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Wizard
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November 26th, 2011 at 3:04:50 PM permalink
Good answers, thanks. To be honest, I prefer the old statue, at least for that location. What little time I spent in Mexico City I came away with the impression that the city puts an emphasis on public art, and most of it seemed very stoic and traditional. Then you come across that big obnoxious yellow thing. I could see something like that working better at an airport or shopping mall.

Quote: Nareed

There's an unfortunate, not to mention annoying, tendency among Mexicans to use diminutives. I'd say they're overused. They also make everyone sound childish <sigh>



Do you mean ending nouns with ita and ito? If so, I've noticed that too. You see that much more than isimo/a. My Mexican-American hair stylist (whom I cheated on in Argentina) named her dog cosita = little thing.
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Nareed
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November 26th, 2011 at 5:21:40 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Do you mean ending nouns with ita and ito? If so, I've noticed that too.



Exactly that. But there's more. Lately I've noticed a tendency for using baby-talk among adults. Like saying "quecas" instead of "quesadillas." It's awful.
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pacomartin
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November 27th, 2011 at 2:21:47 AM permalink
Quote: Wikipedia

An interesting feature of Mexican Spanish, found throughout the country, is the frequent use of diminutive suffixes with many nouns, adverbs and adjectives, even where no semantic diminution of size or intensity is implied. Most frequent is the -ito/ita suffix, which replaces the final vowel on words that have one. Words ending with -n use the suffix -cito/cita. Use of the diminutive does not necessarily denote small size, but rather often implies an affectionate attitude; thus one may speak of "una casita grande" ('a nice, big house').

When the diminutive suffix is applied to an adjective, often a near-equivalent idea can be expressed in English by "nice and [adjective]". So, for example, a matress (un colchón) described as "blandito" might be "nice and soft", while calling it "blando" might be heard to mean "too soft".
Frequent use of the diminutive is found across all socioeconomic classes, but its "excessive" use is commonly associated with lower-class speech.

In Mexico, the diminutive suffix -ito is also used to form affectives to express politeness or submission (cafecito, meaning little coffee; cabecita, meaning little head; chavito, meaning little young boy), and is attached to names (Marquitos, meaning little Marcos; Juanito, meaning little Juan) denoting affection. In the northern parts of the country, the suffix -ito is often replaced on informal situations by '-illo" (cafecillo, cabecilla, morrillo, Juanillo).

In Spanish, the "-ísimo" is used as a suffix to emphasize the original meaning of adjectives; it is equivalent to the Italian/Latin/Portuguese "issimo/íssimo". For instance, the word "grande", which means literally big, can be emphasized (grandísimo) therefore meaning "very big". Unlike many Spanish-speaking countries, it is common in Mexico to emphasize the adjective twice or three times: grandísimo, meaning "very big", can be emphasized again (grandisísimo), thus meaning "very very big"; and even again (grandisisísimo), meaning "very very very big".

The suffix "-ote" is typically used in Mexico as the augmentative ending; thus making nouns bigger, larger, more powerful, etc. For example, the word "camión" by itself literally means "bus"; adding the suffix, camionzote means "big or long bus". It can be repeated just as in the case of the suffix "-ito" and "-ísimo", therefore camionzotototote means "very very very big bus".



Nareed, do you agree with this commentary?
Wizard
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November 27th, 2011 at 5:08:07 AM permalink
You force me to temporarily break out of my series of Mexico City pictures and show this this one from Buenos Aires.

This is the Caminito = little road.



You will see the Caminito mentioned in any book or web site about things to do in Buenos Aires. However, I don't see why it gets so much publicity. El lugar es una trampa de turisitos. It is surrounded by a slum, not within safe walking distance of anything else good to do, and is mostly stores selling cheap souvenirs that are easily found in other parts of the city worth going to. So the buildings are painted bright primary colors -- big deal.
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Nareed
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November 27th, 2011 at 5:30:06 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

El lugar es una trampa de turisitos.



TuristAs
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Wizard
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November 27th, 2011 at 5:47:14 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

TuristAs



Hmmm. I admit I would have blown that on a Spanish test. I know that with adjectives the gender should match the thing it is describing. However, in this case, we are using a noun as an adjetive. I thought in that case the describing noun didn't change. In this case I would have assumed trampa de turistas to mean a trap for female tourists only. Of course I'm not challenging you, but you wish to add any words of clarification, I'm all ears.
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