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Nareed
Nareed
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November 20th, 2011 at 5:23:06 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for your comments, as always.



You're welcome.

BTW if you say "si llevas esta pulsera..." You're saying "if you carry this bracelet..." That can mean wearing it, but also putting in your pocket or purse and carrying it with you.

On the pother hand, if you see a man who wears ties but isn't wearing one, or a woman without makeup who usually does wear make up, you'd say "No lleva corbata/maquillaje" or "no trae corbata/maquillaje." That's because they often do wear them, therefore they use them.

Quote:

Cuánta cuesta?



¿Cuanto tienes?" :)

Quote:

Why isn't it por venta? Or maybe para.



Beats me, but it isn't.

Quote:

Here in Vegas you see signs on very-used cars that say, I think, para vender. If that is wrong, the mistake is mine.



You don't see many "for sale" signs in Mexico. on a used car, the custom is to use masking tape (it stays on but is easy to take off) in the shape of a peso sign ("$" The dollar sign has two vertical bars, and I do know why), along with a phone number. These days it's almost always a cel number, easily identifiable because it begins with 04455 in Mex City and the very large metro area.

On houses and apartments you'll see signs saying "Se Vende" and a phone number.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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November 21st, 2011 at 5:12:22 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Cuánta cuesta? Why isn't it por venta? Or maybe para. Here in Vegas you see signs on very-used cars that say, I think, para vender. If that is wrong, the mistake is mine.




I have seen “tengo un puente para venderte” on many blogs.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 22nd, 2011 at 5:19:46 PM permalink
By the way, sorry about the very irregular schedule of the SWD lately. I've been very busy, but will try to return to a normal schedule next week. Meanwhile, if anybody else wants to introduce one, have at it!

La biblioteca esta cerrado en Lunes = The library is closed on Mondays.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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November 22nd, 2011 at 6:59:11 PM permalink
Quote: Common Traffic words


bus stop — parada
crossing — cruce
curve — curva
danger — peligro
dead end — sin salida
detour — desvío, desviación
downtown, city center — centro
exit — salida
lane — carril
no entry — entrada prohibida
no passing — adelantamiento prohibido
one-way — de sentido único, sentido obligatorio
police — policía
prohibited — prohibido, prohibida
road closed — camino cerrado
slow — despacio
stop — alto, pare or stop, depending on the region
speed limit — velocidad máxima
toll — peaje, cobro
viewpoint — vista de interés
yield — ceda, ceda el paso


speed bump — tope

pedestrians — peatóns

parking — estacionamiento, aparcamiento



The tope is a particularly dreaded part about driving in Mexico. They are everywhere, and they are huge.They shake up your suspension.

The Spanish word piéton is derived from the French word piéton. Spanish words that are derived from French are relatively rare. Naturally there are many similarities in vocabulary because both languages came from Latin, but it is unusual for words to cross over. Cognates are peon and pawn.

Tolls in Mexico are called cobro as far as I know. I have never seen a toll booth marked peaje.



Nareed
Nareed
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November 22nd, 2011 at 7:43:47 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

pedestrians — peatóns



That's peatonEs.

Quote:

The tope is a particularly dreaded part about driving in Mexico. They are everywhere, and they are huge.They shake up your suspension.



You get used to them. Even in my daily route where I run across a speed bump on average every 200 meters.

The real problem are the bumps they put up in the middle of a street for no reason, which slows down traffic to a crawl sometimes.

And, of course, if Mexicans obeyed stop signs, speed bumps wouldn't be necessary. As it is, stop signs are a dying breed, if they haven't died already. Even red lights are considered to mean "you may want to consider stopping here." <sigh>

Quote:

Tolls in Mexico are called cobro as far as I know. I have never seen a toll booth marked peaje.



Toll means "cuota." Toll booth means "caseta de cobro." "Peaje" is understood, but seldom used.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
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November 22nd, 2011 at 7:44:22 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

La biblioteca esta cerrado en Lunes = The library is closed on Mondays.



"La biblioteca esta cerradA..."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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November 22nd, 2011 at 8:22:35 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That's peatonEs.



I can't seem to shake English spelling, even if I know better.
Nareed
Nareed
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November 24th, 2011 at 1:16:24 PM permalink
This thread has gotten quiet. Too quiet :P

Let's try something different. Why doesn't someone, other than Paco, bring up a word or phrase they'd like to see explained?

<cuing crickets...>
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Wizard
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Wizard
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November 26th, 2011 at 6:18:06 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

This thread has gotten quiet. Too quiet :P



Get ready for it to heat up. I don't like to announce publicly when I'm out of town, but I just got back from 11 days in Argentina and Uruguay. That is why it got so quiet here. Before I get to that, here are a couple of comments/questions relating to traffic.

1. In Argentina I noticed a lot of traffic signs with the word obra. This means worker, I presume to warn drivers of road-repair work, which seemed to be going on all over the place.

2. What is the word for a traffic circle/roundabout? I spent a few hours in Mexico City on my way back and noticed some huge ones. For example, the one shown here. It is hard to tell this is a traffic circle from the picture, but that yellow sculpture and fountain are in the middle of it.



Click on the picture for a larger version. I'd be interested to know what the yellow statue is supposed to be.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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November 26th, 2011 at 6:29:05 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

1. In Argentina I noticed a lot of traffic signs with the word obra. This means worker, I presume to warn drivers of road-repair work, which seemed to be going on all over the place.



"Obra" = "work" as in construction work, an artist's work, etc. Not as in a job.

"Hay obras cerca de mi casa" = "There's construction work near my house."

"Las calles están en obra" = "The streets are being repaired."

"Trabajador" = "Worker"

"Obrador" = "Slaughterhouse"

Quote:

2. What is the word for a traffic circle/roundabout?



Glorieta :)

Quote:

I'd be interested to know what the yellow statue is supposed to be.



I don't know. The building behind you, with the Starbucks sign just to the right of your elbow, is called "La Torre del Caballito," or "Small Horse Tower." Currently it houses government offices, mostly belonging to the Secretaría de Salud (I've been there on business a few times). The "glorieta" is often called "Glorieta del Caballito." Draw your own conclusions (I don't dare to).
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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