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NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
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November 15th, 2011 at 8:43:50 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 10 de Noviembre, 2011
Estado: Tabasco
Palabras: Pimiento


Por favor me hace una tortilla con queso, tomates, cebollas y pimientos muchísmos. = Please make me an omelet with cheese, tomatoes, onions, and extra peppers.



I believe that in Mexico, tomate becomes jitomate.
NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
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November 15th, 2011 at 8:57:00 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote: Wizard

That is interesting about it not being implied that portarse means to behave well. It certainly is the case in English that "behave" implies "behave well."



ON that, I realized something later on. If you'd said "Si nos comportamos, Maryann..." you'd have had it right. "Comportar" also means "to behave" but when used by itself, as when an annoyed mother lovingly yells to her misbehaving child "¡Compórtate!" it means "behave well!" Sorry about the omission.



In English, comportment means "good behavior". To comport oneself would be to behave well.
Nareed
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November 15th, 2011 at 9:03:45 AM permalink
Quote: NowTheSerpent

I believe that in Mexico, tomate becomes jitomate.



Not really.

The red tomatoes are usually called "jitomates." They come in two main varieties, "bola" and "guaje." The latter is also called "guajito" and "saladette." But this isn't so hard and fast. Catsup is known also as "salsa de tomate." Tomato soup will usually be called "sopa o crema de tomate."

Green tomatoes are called "tomates" or "tomates verdes." They're sold either with leaves or "clean."
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NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
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November 15th, 2011 at 9:31:26 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote: NowTheSerpent

I believe that in Mexico, tomate becomes jitomate.



Not really.

The red tomatoes are usually called "jitomates." They come in two main varieties, "bola" and "guaje." The latter is also called "guajito" and "saladette." But this isn't so hard and fast. Catsup is known also as "salsa de tomate." Tomato soup will usually be called "sopa o crema de tomate."

Green tomatoes are called "tomates" or "tomates verdes." They're sold either with leaves or "clean."



That's interesting. Now that I think about it, the signs at El Super with "jitomates" were over the red tomatoes. I don't deal with any other kind, so I must have overgeneralized quite a bit. Thx. :)
NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
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November 15th, 2011 at 9:31:45 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote: NowTheSerpent

I believe that in Mexico, tomate becomes jitomate.



Not really.

The red tomatoes are usually called "jitomates." They come in two main varieties, "bola" and "guaje." The latter is also called "guajito" and "saladette." But this isn't so hard and fast. Catsup is known also as "salsa de tomate." Tomato soup will usually be called "sopa o crema de tomate."

Green tomatoes are called "tomates" or "tomates verdes." They're sold either with leaves or "clean."



That's interesting. Now that I think about it, the signs at El Super with "jitomates" were over the red tomatoes. I don't deal with any other kind, so I must have overgeneralized quite a bit. Thx. :)
NowTheSerpent
NowTheSerpent
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November 15th, 2011 at 9:31:45 AM permalink
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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November 15th, 2011 at 12:31:08 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That is interesting about it not being implied that portarse means to behave well. It certainly is the case in English that "behave" implies "behave well."



There is a logical progression here.

portar means "to carry"
portarse means "to carry yourself" which is used metaphorically as "to conduct yourself well"
comportar means "to carry on together" which implies that you conduct yourself well with other people.

In English we have adopted the Latin word as "comport" in the English custom of dropping the suffix. We have also retained the noun "porter" as someone who carries things.

The English verb "behave" was adopted from Anglo Saxon from "be-" as an intensive prefix plus "have" in sense of "to have oneself in a particular way". Also the Anglo Saxon "behabban" meant "to contain" and when used about yourself meant "to contain" your baser emotions and exercise self restraint.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 15th, 2011 at 1:04:39 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin


portar means "to carry"



I thought llevar is to carry. For example, if you want to order food "to go," you would say para llevar. Entonces, como son llevar y portar differente?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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November 15th, 2011 at 2:01:52 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought llevar is to carry. For example, if you want to order food "to go," you would say para llevar. Entonces, como son llevar y portar differente?



I think we've gone over this distinction before.

Either that, or I'm having a very strong case of deja vu.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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November 15th, 2011 at 2:27:51 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed


I think we've gone over this distinction before.

Either that, or I'm having a very strong case of deja vu.



Es probablemente mia culpa. This sounds vaguely familiar to me too. However, I have to hear something about 20 times before it is filed under permanent memory.

I will ask my tutor about how I expressed the future in my ejemplo previously.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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