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Wizard
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Wizard
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November 10th, 2011 at 6:56:31 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I'm not sure there is a tabasco variety of pepper. I checked a bottel in the pantry, and the ingredients listed are "red peppers, vinegar, salt."

Also you seem to suggest "pimiento" means any kind of pepper, like jalapeño or habanero. As far as I know, "pimiento" applies only to bell peppers, and perhaps to whatever plant product paprika comes from. All others, including all the hot peppers, are called "chiles."



Mi hermano is a botanist, who I'll use as my lifeline if this gets too difficult. For now, Wikipedia says that tabasco sauce comes from the tabasco pepper plant. I too have a bottle of tabasco sauce that lists the same ingredients. However, I doubt it comes from red bell peppers, which are not very hot. Wikipedia says the tabasco pepper starts out yellow, changes to orange, and then red when ripe and ready to pick. So, I submit for your consideration that when the tabasco sauce bottle says "red peppers" they mean tabasco peppers that have turned red.
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Nareed
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November 10th, 2011 at 7:21:05 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

However, I doubt it comes from red bell peppers, which are not very hot.



They're not hot at all. If you want them to taste hot, you have to pour tabasco sauce on them :)

Quote:

Wikipedia says the tabasco pepper starts out yellow, changes to orange, and then red when ripe and ready to pick. So, I submit for your consideration that when the tabasco sauce bottle says "red peppers" they mean tabasco peppers that have turned red.



I've learned a lot about the different varieties of peppers that exist, and I know I don't know them all. So there could be a tabasco variety. But, seriously, there are several red chiles. For example, the chile de árbol and guajillo are always red. Jalapeños can be green or red. And there are others. I've mentioned elsewhere you won't find natural chipotles or a chipotle plant, because chipotles are dried, smoked jalapeños. The tabasco pepper could be a variety on its own right, or merely a red sub-variant of antoher pepper.

BTW tabasco sauce is made with aged pepeprs. They're placed in casks with lots of salt and left there for weeks or months before they can be used to make the very simple sauce.

Until habanero sauces became popular, too, tabasco was about the hottest sauce around. It's so hot many people find it hard to belive it's made in the US and not in Mexico.
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teddys
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November 10th, 2011 at 8:09:33 AM permalink

Edit: Oops.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
pacomartin
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November 10th, 2011 at 8:35:44 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I both love and hate mysteries like this. They will drive me crazy until I have an answer. For example, I will not die in peace unless I discover what happened to Chuck on Happy Days.

My understanding of a "red herring" is a something deliberately meant to confuse or distract attention away from the truth. Usually when you encounter the term it is in the investigation of a homicide, where some false clue leads the detectives in the wrong direction is later deemed a "red herring." Sometimes people call certain political issues a "red herring," like the legality of burning the flag, because there are much more important problems that deserve attention. So, this doesn't sound to me like a "red herring." I would just say it is a "mystery."



The idea of "red herring" is that you would drag a "red herring" over a trail, so that the powerful smell would make the hunting dogs would lose the scent.
A "decoy" is not exactly the same thing. I think of a decoy primarily as something to lull your prey into a false sense of security. The wooden ducks are used so that the real ducks think the marsh is a safe place, and then they are shot when they attempt to land.

The terms "red" and "white" herring were used to mean "smoked" and "fresh" herring since the early 1400's. But the concept of throwing the hunting dogs off the trail has existed in writing for over three centuries. The metaphoric sense of "diverting someone from the basic issue" has been used since the 19th century.

It seems like such basic human behavior that you would think that there would be an equivalent idiomatic expression in Spanish.

However, there are Spanish idioms like pedir la luna or "to lift the moon" which metaphorically means to "ask the impossible".
Offhand I can't think of the equivalent idiom in English. We tend to say it literally as "you are asking the impossible".

Other Spanish idioms like "por debajo de agua" have similar idioms in English like "underhanded" or "under the table". But usually if we say "under water" in English, we mean financially insolvent, but not necessarily underhanded or criminal.

Other idioms like "un ojo de la cara" are basically the same in both languages.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 10th, 2011 at 8:52:18 AM permalink
Quote: teddys



Effective immediately, the rule about at least one word in Spanish word per post is struck down. I would have to be too much of the bad cop to keep enforcing it.

La biblioteca es hecho de ladrillos.
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Nareed
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November 10th, 2011 at 8:57:33 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

La biblioteca es hecho de ladrillos.



La biblioteca ESTA hechA de ladrillos.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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November 10th, 2011 at 9:05:29 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

La biblioteca ESTA hechA de ladrillos.



I know I blew it on the hecho. I was thinking of this expression you see on Mexican beer bottles often.



However, why is it estar and not ser? Ser is more permanent in nature, right, and once the library is made of bricks, it is going to remain that way.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Doc
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November 10th, 2011 at 9:11:38 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Effective immediately, the rule about at least one word in Spanish word per post is struck down. I would have to be too much of the bad cop to keep enforcing it.


Sólo dos de nosotros sufrimos la pena.

I think.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 10th, 2011 at 9:16:49 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

Sólo dos de nosotros sufrimos la pena.



Tres. Tú (I think we're no longer on an Ud. basis), Nareed, y yo. Paco was charged once but he never served his sentence.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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November 10th, 2011 at 9:17:21 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

However, there are Spanish idioms like pedir la luna or "to lift the moon" which metaphorically means to "ask the impossible".
Offhand I can't think of the equivalent idiom in English. We tend to say it literally as "you are asking the impossible".



Pedir means to request or to ask for something, not to lift something. The expression then means "to ask for the Moon." In English the most similar would be "To wish for the Moon."

Now, if you were to say "¿Y tu nieve de qué sabor?" it means, "You're asking for too much." conversely, the phrase "No son las perlas de la virgen," means "I'm not asking much."

More later. I've got to go break up with a bank (tengo que tronar con un banco)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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