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Nareed
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November 8th, 2011 at 6:28:25 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

How would you translate this lyric, from a well-known Paul McCartney song:

"Ebony And Ivory Live Together In Perfect Harmony"



"Ébano y Marfil viven juntos en perfecta harmonía."

In Spaniosh these lyrics qualify as "cursi," BTW.

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There are several Corcordia universities in the United States.



And a Concord grape, and a Concocrd, Mass, and a plane called Concorde.

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Hmmm. SpanistDict.com doesn't recognize the words más and ún. If you put them in the search field they will refer you to mas and un



In order to protect checks from being altered, you try not to leave any open spaces. So while the proper way to write 1,000 is "mil" when doind a check for that amount, I, and msot epople, will write "ún mil pesos." I recall seeing it writen with an accent more often that not.

Well, so much for the upstairs review :)

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In other news, I just finished watching Rudo y Cursi.



I think the most recent Mexican movie I saw was "El Patrullero 777" with Cantinflas. That was back in the 70s. I've seen other Mexican movies since, surely, but that was the one produced most recently.

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To get back to the movie, they mentioned a multi-level marketing business, like Amway. I didn't catch the Spanish name, and it got translated to WonderLife, or something like that. My question is was this a real company, and are such pyramid schemes, if I may call it that, common in Mexico?



they must mean "Herba Life." I've not heard about it recently, but it was everywhere a few years ago. it's an Amway type of pyramid, but I wouldn't quite call it a scheme. After all, there is new revenue brought in by actual sales of actual products that are actually produced. Oh, I forget whether it was a weight-loss diet or a line of supplements. If it's fraudulent, I'd suspect the contents more than the means.

Pyramid schemes were common back in the late 80s to early 90s. I know people who got caught up in them.

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My second question is there were a few scenes in a small casino, where the featured game was poker. A loan shark was clearly seen working the floor and offering cocaine like a cocktail waitress. I'm not sure what my question is, but I'd be interested to hear any comments about the legality of said casino, and realism of the scene in general.



I've never seen actual cards being played in any of my two visits to casinos in Mexico, nor craps. There was the automated roulette I reported about, Royal Match BJ and forms of electronic poker.

As a rule, though, you should doubt everything you see in the movies as if it were holy writ :)

Sorry to have kept you waiting for such a crappy post.
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Wizard
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November 8th, 2011 at 9:52:37 PM permalink
Fecha: 9 de Noviembre, 2011
Estado: Sonora
Palabras: Vidrio




Today's state is Sonora. We are back to a state I have been to. Once I crossed the border at Sonoyta, Arizona and drove all the way to Tecate, CA. From what I gather from the news it seems that the weakest link along the US/Mexico border is between Sonora and Arizona.

Today's SWD is vidrio, which means glass (as in the material), coming from the city of Los Vidrios. It should not be confused with vaso, which means the kind of glass you drink out of. Another word for the material glass is cristal. A question for the advanced readers is what is the difference between vidrio y cristal.

Another question for the advanced readers is what does sonora itself mean? My dictionary says it means cittern. Why don't you ever see anybody playing the cittern in Mariachi bands?



Ejemplo time.

Personas que viven en casas de vidrio no debe tirar piedras. = People who live in glass houses should not throw stones.
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pacomartin
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November 9th, 2011 at 3:36:33 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's state is Sonora. We are back to a state I have been to. Once I crossed the border at Sonoyta, Arizona and drove all the way to Tecate, CA. From what I gather from the news it seems that the weakest link along the US/Mexico border is between Sonora and Arizona.



I assume you drove along route 3 along the water. I drove on route 2 near the border, and it is like a DMZ. When you go into a convenience store, all the young troops are openly displaying their Uzzis. They seem afraid to leave them in the trunk long enough to get a coffee. It's a very different experience.

It's by far the weakest link because there are no cities or even small towns to speak of on either side of the border.

==============

The DRAE definition is similar to the English word sonorous, or the Spanish verb sonar meaning "to sound".
sonoro, ra. (Del lat. sonōrus).
1. adj. Que suena o puede sonar.
2. adj. Que suena bien, o que suena mucho y agradablemente. Voz, palabra sonora. Instrumento, verso, período sonoro.
3. adj. Que despide bien, o hace que se oiga bien, el sonido. Bóveda sonora. Teatro sonoro.
4. adj. Fonetica Dicho de un sonido: Que se articula con vibración de las cuerdas vocales.

The better known nautical term is SONAR, which is an acronym for SOund Navigation And Ranging. It's an acronym invented in WWII meant to deliberately imitate RADAR which was much better known. Prior to WWII, SONAR was called ASDIC. (I didn't look that up, it was my profession for decades.)

However, the Spanish word "sonora" is a "red herring" , as the state may be named for "Nuestra Señora del Rosario" where the ñ sound was dropped because the native languages did not have the sound. Father Cristóbal de Cañas in 1730, states that the name comes from the word for a natural water well, “sonot”, which the Spanish eventually modified to Sonora. The truth is nobody knows exactly why the state has that name.

============
What is the equivalent Spanish idiom for "red herring".
Nareed
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November 9th, 2011 at 6:32:05 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD is vidrio, which means glass (as in the material), coming from the city of Los Vidrios. It should not be confused with vaso, which means the kind of glass you drink out of.



A plastic container shaped like a drinking glass is also called "vaso" in Spanish. The same container in English is called a cup. "Taza is Spanish for "cup" but it applies only to drinking utensils witha handle. I could go on with mugs and such, but I won't. It's just too confusing.

Oh, the word "vidrio" might ahve been bertter suited to Nuevo León, which as I recall is the home of the Vitro corporation, the country's largest glass manufacturer.

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Another word for the material glass is cristal. A question for the advanced readers is what is the difference between vidrio y cristal.



That's a word that needs reforming, as it also means "crystal" like quartz or salt. Usually vidrio means any glass, while "cristal" means fine glass, such as a Swarowski piece, or anything else that's fine and expensive and made of glass.

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Another question for the advanced readers is what does sonora itself mean?



No clue.

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Personas que viven en casas de vidrio no debe tirar piedras. = People who live in glass houses should not throw stones.



It's just no use telling you such phrases don't translate well, is it? :)

In any case: "LA GENTE que vive en casas de vidrio no debe tirar piedras."
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Nareed
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November 9th, 2011 at 6:34:19 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

What is the equivalent Spanish idiom for "red herring".



I don't think there is one. You might translate it as "señuelo," which simply means decoy.
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Wizard
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November 9th, 2011 at 6:39:12 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

However, the Spanish word "sonora" is a "red herring"...What is the equivalent Spanish idiom for "red herring".



I both love and hate mysteries like this. They will drive me crazy until I have an answer. For example, I will not die in peace unless I discover what happened to Chuck on Happy Days.

My understanding of a "red herring" is a something deliberately meant to confuse or distract attention away from the truth. Usually when you encounter the term it is in the investigation of a homicide, where some false clue leads the detectives in the wrong direction is later deemed a "red herring." Sometimes people call certain political issues a "red herring," like the legality of burning the flag, because there are much more important problems that deserve attention. So, this doesn't sound to me like a "red herring." I would just say it is a "mystery."

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Nareed
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November 9th, 2011 at 6:49:12 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

My understanding of a "red herring" is a something deliberately meant to confuse or distract attention away from the truth.



¿Por qué se llama "arenque rojo"? :P
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November 9th, 2011 at 7:31:53 PM permalink
Fecha: 10 de Noviembre, 2011
Estado: Tabasco
Palabras: Pimiento



Minnesota Vikings. This one is held in one piece by about 1/4" of metal, between the 9 and B. I desperately need a better one.

Today's state is Tabasco. When you say "tabasco," the first thing that comes to my mind is Tabasco Sauce, which is made from the tabasco chili pepper. Pimiento should not be confused with pimienta (with an a), which is the dried fruit from the peppercorn vine (as in salt & pepper).

Ejemplo time.

Por favor me hace una tortilla con queso, tomates, cebollas y pimientos muchísmos. = Please make me an omelet with cheese, tomatoes, onions, and extra peppers.

I think we may have discussed how to say "omelet" in Spanish before. My dictionary says the term is tortilla, which can also mean the thin flour or corn pancake used to make tacos. Seems to me there should be a separate term for it, but I don't make the rules of Spanish. I'll add this to my list of suggestions for the Real Academia de Español.
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pacomartin
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November 9th, 2011 at 10:33:41 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's state is Tabasco. When you say "tabasco," the first thing that comes to my mind is Tabasco Sauce, which is made from the tabasco chili pepper. Pimiento should not be confused with pimienta (with an a), which is the dried fruit from the peppercorn vine (as in salt & pepper).

I think we may have discussed how to say "omelet" in Spanish before. My dictionary says the term is tortilla, which can also mean the thin flour or corn pancake used to make tacos. Seems to me there should be a separate term for it, but I don't make the rules of Spanish. I'll add this to my list of suggestions for the Real Academia de Español.



I was in southern Mexico four years ago when 80% of Tabasco was flooded.




Tabasco Sauce is an American creation from the mid 19th century where all the peppers were grown in Louisiana.

Por favor me hacen una tortilla con queso, tomates, cebollas y pimientos muchos.

As I remember it, all restaurants in Mexico called them omelets. It's hard to say since I don't order them in Mexico normally, as I prefer other breakfast foods.

Nareed
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November 10th, 2011 at 6:29:31 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's state is Tabasco. When you say "tabasco," the first thing that comes to my mind is Tabasco Sauce, which is made from the tabasco chili pepper.



I'm not sure there is a tabasco variety of pepper. I checked a bottel in the pantry, and the ingredients listed are "red peppers, vinegar, salt."

Also you seem to suggest "pimiento" means any kind of pepper, like jalapeño or habanero. As far as I know, "pimiento" applies only to bell peppers, and perhaps to whatever plant product paprika comes from. All others, including all the hot peppers, are called "chiles."

Quote:

Por favor me hace una tortilla con queso, tomates, cebollas y pimientos muchísmos. = Please make me an omelet with cheese, tomatoes, onions, and extra peppers.



We have been through omelet before, as Paco noted.

"Por favor me hace un omelet con queso, tomates, cebollas y muchOS pimientos."

Quote:

I'll add this to my list of suggestions for the Real Academia de Español.



Real Academia de la Lengua Española. No institution set up by royalty can have a simple name :)
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