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Wizard
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Wizard
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November 7th, 2011 at 9:48:22 PM permalink
I have to apologize to Nareed again for stepping on her post. I screwed it up so badly I had to flag it. However, it gave me a chance to make some changes to my ejemplo for the better.

In Nareed's former post she used the word más, and I was wondering, why the accent on the a?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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November 7th, 2011 at 10:21:27 PM permalink
Someday I expect an explanation on que quiere decir "to step on a post"
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pacomartin
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November 8th, 2011 at 4:34:41 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Quote: pacomartin

Nareed, which one of these phrases is correct?

(1) Busco un libro que sea interesante.
(2) Busco un libro que es interesante.



If I may chime in, I would have guessed Busque un libro que sea interesante. I normally wouldn't have even thought to use the subjunctive tense, but since you give the hint, I thought it was appropriate when expressing a desire.

I'm not even sure what the second sentences are trying to say. Something about not being indifferent to pain, but who isn't? Given the choice, I'll always choose to have less of it.


Wizard,

I picked the first question because my verb book says to use sea, but at the same time the google translate used es. I was curious if it was a somewhat archaic grammatical rule. The reason given in the book is "In an adjectival clause if the antecedent is something or someone that is indefinite, negative, vague or nonexistent, you should use the subjunctive mood ... 'un libro' is indefinite ... Notice, however, that the subjunctive is not used in English." Clearly Nareed thought it should be es, and the grammar rule is archaic.

The second question is a lyric from a very famous Argentine protest song from the 1970's (in the subjunctive mood). Normally, the English subjunctive mood is expressed using the word "may" derived from Old English mæg meaning "I am able".

It confuses me what is the best translation:
Solo le pido a Dios
Que el dolor no me sea indiferente
"I only ask of God
He not let me be indifferent to pain" (1)
That I may not be indifferent to pain" (2)
That the pain is not indifferent to me" (3)

I would go with #2, but I see it translated as #1 or #3 in some cases (like the link above).

I think this may be a good question for your Argentine tutor. The song is 33 years old, but in all probability she has heard it.
Nareed
Nareed
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November 8th, 2011 at 7:20:27 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Palabras: Concordia
[..]
Today's SWD is corncodia, which is a municipality in Sinaloa, and means harmony or agreement.



It seems the spelling is giving you trouble .

Quote:

Todo el mundo estaba en concordia en que Sra. Howell era perezoso y debería ayudar mas seguido en la isla. = Everyone was in agreement that Mrs. Howell was lazy, and should help out on the island more often.



You picked an odd word. It's not used often and these days mostly you hear it as the name of a place. Still, I think the usage is wrong. Think of the word "harmony" rather than agreement. You wouldn't say a group of people are in harmony over something, but rather that there exists harmony within a group of people. From the dictioanry definition it would seem the meaning is more akin to "accord" than "agreement."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
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November 8th, 2011 at 7:24:56 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In Nareed's former post she used the word más, and I was wondering, why the accent on the a?



Spanish monosyllables are a big pain. Many of them supposedly change meaning depending on whether they have an accent or not, but I never could figure out why. "Más" is one you usually see with an accent, like "ún" and "él" for some reason.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 8th, 2011 at 8:28:59 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You picked an odd word. It's not used often and these days mostly you hear it as the name of a place.



How would you translate this lyric, from a well-known Paul McCartney song:

"Ebony And Ivory Live Together In Perfect Harmony"

There are several Corcordia universities in the United States.

Quote: Nareed

Spanish monosyllables are a big pain. Many of them supposedly change meaning depending on whether they have an accent or not, but I never could figure out why. "Más" is one you usually see with an accent, like "ún" and "él" for some reason.



Hmmm. SpanistDict.com doesn't recognize the words más and ún. If you put them in the search field they will refer you to mas and un. A while back Paco had a list of words that changed meaning with or without the accent, like el/él and si/sí. I'm sure I will lose in the "upstairs review," but I have to throw the challenge flag on más and ún.

In other news, I just finished watching Rudo y Cursi. Have you guys seen it? By the way, you rebuked me for using the word guys before, obviously referring to you and Paco. However, the word has evolved to refer to both males and females. It has a similar connotation to "pals."

To get back to the movie, they mentioned a multi-level marketing business, like Amway. I didn't catch the Spanish name, and it got translated to WonderLife, or something like that. My question is was this a real company, and are such pyramid schemes, if I may call it that, common in Mexico?

My second question is there were a few scenes in a small casino, where the featured game was poker. A loan shark was clearly seen working the floor and offering cocaine like a cocktail waitress. I'm not sure what my question is, but I'd be interested to hear any comments about the legality of said casino, and realism of the scene in general.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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November 8th, 2011 at 8:53:41 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Spanish monosyllables are a big pain. Many of them supposedly change meaning depending on whether they have an accent or not, but I never could figure out why. "Más" is one you usually see with an accent, like "ún" and "él" for some reason.



The following list is put together by a Spanish professor, and only has 12 words. The last two translate to the same English word, but the accent is used in the interrogative sense.

I have never seen un with an accent except in Portuguese.

el the ("el anillo") él he, him ("es él", "es para él")
si if yes, himself
mi my ("mi casa") me ("es para mí")
de of give
te yourself ("¿Cómo te llamas?") tea
se himself, herself I know, be ("¡Sé bueno!")
mas but ("quiero, mas no puedo") más more ("¿Quieres más?")
que that ("más que nada") qué what ("¿Qué piensas?")
tu your ("tu libro") you ("¿Cómo estás tú?")
cuan So (tan) (uso arcaico) ("Mira el pelo cuan largo lo tengo") cuán how ("¡Cuán desgraciado soy! ")
cual which ("Esta carta, la cual no tiene remitente, llegó ayer") cuál which ("¿Cuál es el mejor?)
quien who ("Hay quien dice eso") quién who ("¿Quién es esa mujer?")


In particular "dé" is the imperitive or the subjunctive mood of the verb "dar" or to give. I suppose that a native Spanish speaker could always tell by context which word they are using, and the accent seems superfulous.

Many of the words that are today standardly written with an accent mark appeared more often without it up until around 1880. These include words with final stress ending in -n (e.g. capitán, también, jardín, acción, común but not future-tense verb forms like serán, tendrán);verbs in the imperfect tense (e.g. tenía, vivían); the possessives mío and mía; and the word día. (Wikipedia)

Mexicans do not commonly use the future tense. Instead they prefer the periphrastic future.
Wizard
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Wizard
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November 8th, 2011 at 9:24:13 AM permalink
I admit I was wrong about mas y más. All these years I thought mas=more, and there was no such thing as más. Strange it took me this long to learn this. Then again, I'm not sure my elevator goes all the way to the top floor, if you know what I mean.

So, I accept the loss of a time out on that one, but let's see what Nareed says about the upstairs review on ún.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
NowTheSerpent
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November 8th, 2011 at 9:56:13 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Why might it not be deseé un deseo?



Hold down the ALT key and enter 164. I still deseo there were an easier way.



can~a
Nareed
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November 8th, 2011 at 11:06:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, I accept the loss of a time out on that one, but let's see what Nareed says about the upstairs review on ún.



Nareed se encuentra muy ocupada juntando basura para el gobierno del DF.

I'll get back to you as soon as I can.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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