Thread Rating:

Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 26th, 2011 at 1:09:30 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Mozo, me gustan la ardilla asada, ensalada de chicharras, y un pastel de escamoles, por favor = Waiter, I would like to have the roasted squirrel, cicada salad, and an ant-egg cake, please.



I said:

"Mozo, QUIERO la ardilla asada...."

You don't usually order by saying "I would like," but rather "I will have," or "I want."

Also as far as I know "chicharra" is a word for "buzzer."

Or words to that effect.

Also, while you'd be understood in most places by using "mozo" the word most often used is "joven" which means pretty much the same thing. neitehr means waiter, BTW. The word for that is "mesero."

I you have a waitress (meserA), the word to use is "señorita."

That's a rather new plate. Part of your collection?
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
October 26th, 2011 at 1:58:59 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Mozo, QUIERO la ardilla asada...."

You don't usually order by saying "I would like," but rather "I will have," or "I want."



Telling the waiter "I want..." seems so rude. It is like you are bossing him/her around. This transcends restaurants. In almost any situation where one person is allowed/supposed to tell the other what to do, it is good manners to ask anyway, or state what you hope they will do. Exceptions might be for a coach or drill sergeant. Of course, I'm just talking about here. I think in China you would just start barking orders at the waiter.

Saying "I will have..." is also okay, but I think doesn't come off as nicely as "May I have..." or "I would like..."

Quote:

Also, while you'd be understood in most places by using "mozo" the word most often used is "joven" which means pretty much the same thing. neitehr means waiter, BTW. The word for that is "mesero." I you have a waitress (meserA), the word to use is "señorita."



I wasn't sure what word to use for "waiter." As I recall, the choices were mozo or joven. However, joven wouldn't seem appropriate if the waiter was old. Same issue with señorita, what if she was 70 years old? Some cocktail waitresses at the Riviera are that old, and still have to wear revealing outfits meant for a woman 50 years younger. I'd feel silly calling one of them señorita. Then again, maybe they would like it.

Quote:

Part of your collection?



All the pictures are. I've got about 75% of the states in my motocicleta run, and about 90% in the newer graphic format. I also bought that set of mostly 76 plates that were on Ebay about a month ago.

Sorry, again, about stepping on your post. I don't know why I only do that to you.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 26th, 2011 at 3:34:54 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Telling the waiter "I want..." seems so rude. It is like you are bossing him/her around.



The action of ordering in a restaurant is called ordering for a reason :)

But you could also say "le pido...." or "me trae...." or "le ordeno un..."

Quote:

I wasn't sure what word to use for "waiter." As I recall, the choices were mozo or joven. However, joven wouldn't seem appropriate if the waiter was old.



You get used to it.

When I'm in America, I usually call the waitress "Miss." I can't recall what I call waiters.

Quote:

Same issue with señorita, what if she was 70 years old?



You get used to that, too.


Quote:

I also bought that set of mostly 76 plates that were on Ebay about a month ago.



I should have bet on whether you'd get it or not...
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
October 26th, 2011 at 3:43:02 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I should have bet on whether you'd get it or not...



I would have given you very good odds, at least 100 to 1. I've purchased hundreds of things on eBay and was only cheated once, to the tune of about $700. I filed a complaint with Paypal too late for them to do anything about it. My fault for giving the other party too much time to respond to my many messages. Long story.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 26th, 2011 at 4:00:24 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I would have given you very good odds, at least 100 to 1.



I wouldn't have bet against you. I mean, you don't bet with the person capable of determining the outcome. And I'm not sure what you'd prefer: to add to your collection, or to win a bet no matter how small.

Quote:

I've purchased hundreds of things on eBay and was only cheated once,



I used to shop there a lot. It's changed, alas, and not quite for the better. I also only got cheated once.

Quote:

to the tune of about $700.



Not that badly. I bought a denim jumper for, say $20, which I thought was a fair price (it was more, but I don't recall exactly). It arrived, reasonably on time, but it had a price tag on stating, say $17.50 All I did was leave some bad feedback.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
October 26th, 2011 at 6:46:26 PM permalink
Fecha: 27 de Octubre, 2011
Estado: Jalisco
Palabra: Jarabe



Kansas City Chiefs.

Jalisco is another state along the Pacific coast and home to Mexico's second largest city, Guadalajara. It is also one of the states I can claim to have been to, after a stop in Puerto Vallarta on a cruise.

Today's SWD is Jarabe, which is a kind of dance popular in Jalisco, which means syrup. It must come from the verb
jarabear
, which means to drink sweet beverages frequently. I find it extraño that they would have a word for such an obscure habit, yet still no single word for toe.

Ejemplo time.

Normalmentle me gusta jarabe sobre mis crepes, pero tengo miedo de la botella Señora Mantequilla. = Normally I like syrup on my pancakes, but I'm afraid of the Mrs. Butterworth's bottle.

It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
October 26th, 2011 at 6:58:17 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Jalisco is another state along the Pacific coast and home to Mexico's second largest city, Guadalajara. It is also one of the states I can claim to have been to, after a stop in Puerto Vallarta on a cruise.



Jalisco and Guadalajara are to Mexico what the province and city of Sevilla are to Spain. They both developed a somewhat unique culture in their country, but to the rest of the world they are the exemplar of that nation. Sevilla with flamenco dancing and the magnificent architecture built on the massive amount of money brought in from the New World. Guadalajara was the birthplace of Mariachi music, and the hat dance which came to signify Mexico around the world.

Puerto Vallarta was a tiny fishing village when they began filming the Night of the Iguana. So many reporters came to report on Liz and Dick, they ended up making the city world famous.



And of course, just outside of Guadalajara is one of the most famous little towns in the world.



The hispanic population of Los Angeles is 1,888,158 as of 2010 and still growing. Most Latinos in LA are Mexican. The population of Guadalajara 1,564,514 and shrinking. Monterrey's population is 1,130,960.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 26th, 2011 at 7:52:05 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD is Jarabe, which is a kind of dance popular in Jalisco, which means syrup. It must come from the verb jarabear, which means to drink sweet beverages frequently.



You're making me work extra today....

The dictionary says "jarabear" means "to prescribe syrups often," as a doctor would do and "to drink syrups often for purgind purposes."

The dance as far asI know consists of one song called "El Jarabe Tapatio." The last word is to refer to people and things from Guadalajara, Jalisco's cpaital. I've heard there's something called "El Jarabe Nayarita," presumably from Jalisco's neighboring state Nayarit.

Quote:

I find it extraño that they would have a word for such an obscure habit, yet still no single word for toe.



Whether it means that or what the dictionary says, I find it odd, too; toe or no toe, too.

Quote:

Normalmentle me gusta jarabe sobre mis crepes, pero tengo miedo de la botella Señora Mantequilla. = Normally I like syrup on my pancakes, but I'm afraid of the Mrs. Butterworth's bottle.




Normalmente me gusta PONERLE" or "Normalmente me gusta EL" "Jarabe sobre mis hot cakes [that was a word of the day once, one of mine]. pero LE tengo miedo a la botella de Mrs. Butterworth's."

Butterworth's is a name, and names are not to be translated. Brand names either. Besides, it doesn't mean "butter." You could go so far as to say "la botella de la Señora Butterworth's," as "Mrs." is a title and not a name.

Oh, "crepes" is not Spanish. There is a word "crepa" which means "crepe" but those aren't pancakes. They're often made with pancake batter, yes, but they're not supposed to be.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 26th, 2011 at 7:56:15 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Guadalajara was the birthplace of Mariachi music, and the hat dance which came to signify Mexico around the world.



Well, yes. But it would be unfair and it would be too late to nuke the place now :P
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23426
October 26th, 2011 at 8:04:59 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The dictionary says "jarabear" means "to prescribe syrups often,"



Sounds like my mother. She always made me drink a lot of cough syrup whenever I was sick.

Quote: Nareed

... pero LE tengo miedo a la botella de Mrs. Butterworth's."



Why the le? We have already established what I'm afraid of, so the "le" seems redundant. Also, why didn't you put lo?

Quote: Nareed

Butterworth's is a name, and names are not to be translated. Brand names either. Besides, it doesn't mean "butter."



Then why do they translate Santa Claus into Papá Noel? Isn't Santa Claus a name?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

  • Jump to: