Thread Rating:

Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23418
October 23rd, 2011 at 8:03:32 AM permalink
Fecha: 23 de Octubre, 2011
Estado: Durango
Palabra: alacrán



Cincinnati Bengals.

Today's state is Durango. It is a large and sparsely populated state in central Mexico. There is also a Ford pick-up camíon by the same name.

I read that Durango is famous for scorpions, and the residents are even known by that term. Entonces, today's SWD is alacrán = scorpion. As usual, it would be too easy if anything had just one word, so we also have the word escorpión.

Ejemplo time.

No nadas en este lago. Esta leno de los alacráns. = Don't swim in this lake. It is full of scorpions.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 23rd, 2011 at 8:24:53 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

No nadas en este lago. Esta leno de los alacráns. = Don't swim in this lake. It is full of scorpions.



Oy vey.

"No nadES en este lago. Esta lleno de alacranes." Remember simply adding an "s" at the end to get the plural isn't always the case in Spanish.

Also, scorpions don't swim. Remember the fable of the turtle and the scorpion?
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23418
October 23rd, 2011 at 8:32:16 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"No nadES en este lago. Esta lleno de alacranes." Remember simply adding an "s" at the end to get the plural isn't always the case in Spanish.



I see you're using the subjunctive tense. I'm still working on the simple present, past, and future. Agreed, I should have got the es.

Quote: Nareed

Also, scorpions don't swim. Remember the fable of the turtle and the scorpion?



Punto bueno.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 23rd, 2011 at 8:37:04 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Punto bueno.



"Buen punto"

Sorry :)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23418
October 23rd, 2011 at 8:39:59 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Buen punto"



Why do you put the buen first? I thought the adjective generally comes after the noun.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 23rd, 2011 at 8:57:02 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Why do you put the buen first? I thought the adjective generally comes after the noun.



I don't really know. I've been thinking about it, and perhaps adjectives to qualify things as good or bad are different. For instance:

"El Ciudadano Kane es una muy buena película."

"No existe tal cosa como un buen camarón."

"El futbol es un pésimo deporte, si le puedes llamar deporte."

See?
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23418
October 23rd, 2011 at 9:30:39 AM permalink
I thought the regla de pulgar was that the adjective comes after the noun unless you really want to emphasize the adjective. I've also noticed that when two adjectives are used to describe a noun that the noun tends to go in the middle the two adjective, but have never seen that rule actually addressed.

Are you suggesting there is an exception for buen y buena?

On another topic, there was a joke in Paranormal Activity III. A character took a book from the library without checking it out. Another character notices the checkout card is still in the front. For the benefit of the youngsters in the forum, before computers library books came with a card and jacket in the front. When you checked it out they would remove it and write down the borrowers name and due date on it. So, the conversation went like this:

Jim: Did you steal this book from the library?
John: You're allowed to take books from the library.
Jim: You're supposed to get a library card and check it out.
John: The concept is that you're entitled to take books from the library. That is why in Spanish they call it a biblio-take-it.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
October 23rd, 2011 at 9:34:35 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote: Wizard

Why do you put the buen first? I thought the adjective generally comes after the noun.



I don't really know. I've been thinking about it, and perhaps adjectives to qualify things as good or bad are different.



One linguist offers three cases where the adjectives go before the noun. This case seems to qualify because there is emotive content to the phrase,


Adjectives that reinforce the meaning of the noun, such as adjectives that "go with" the accompanying noun, often are placed before the noun. In many cases, one might also say that the purpose of these adjectives is less for describing the noun that's modified and more for conveying some sort of an emotion to it.
Examples: Una oscura noche, a dark night; el horrible monstruo, the horrible monster; la alta montaña, the high mountain; la blanca nieve, the white snow.

Nondescriptive adjectives: Many adjectives other than those that describe go before the noun.
Examples: Pocos libros, few books; muchas palomas, many doves; mi casa, my house; esta mesa, this table; dos libros, two books. Sometimes these adjectives are known by other names, such as possessive pronouns and determiners.

Meaning-changing adjectives: Some adjectives change in meaning (or at least in English translation) depending on whether they're placed before or after the noun. Generally, the adjectives placed after nouns have an objective meaning or one that carries little or no emotional content, while one placed before the noun can indicate something about how the speaker feels toward the person or thing being described.
Example: Mi viejo amigo, my longtime friend; mi amigo viejo, my elderly friend.


tener un accidente
tener un aire a
tener un aire de
tener un alcance superior a
tener un alto concepto de
tener un amigo en la corte
tener un año
tener un año de edad
tener un apego
tener un apetito feroz
tener un argumento convincente
tener un arranque de cólera
tener un arrebato de cólera
tener un asunto con
tener un ataque
tener un ataque de delírium tremens
tener un ataque de risa
tener un buen asidero en
tener un buen asiento
tener un buen cuerpo
tener un buen día
tener un buen diente
tener un buen dominio de
tener un buen lugar
tener un buen número de suscriptores
tener un buen punto
tener un buen saque
tener un cabreo
tener un calambre
tener un calambre en un músculo
tener un calentón
tener un carácter dominante
tener un carácter probativo respecto a
tener un caso
tener un chinguero de
tener un chispazo
tener un choque
tener un cincuenta por ciento de probabilidad
tener un clavo en el corazón
tener un colapso nervioso
tener un combate menor
tener un combate menor a caballo
tener un comienzo brillante
tener un concepto diferente ahora
tener un cosquilleo en el estómago
tener un declive
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
October 23rd, 2011 at 10:39:36 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought the regla de pulgar



Some expressions don't travel well. The translation for "rule of thumb," while accurate, is meaningless.


Quote:

Are you suggesting there is an exception for buen y buena?



I'm suggesting it looks that way. Also for malo, pésimo, etc.

Quote:

On another topic, there was a joke in Paranormal Activity III.



If the whole movie was of that caliber, then I can see why you didn't like it.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
October 23rd, 2011 at 12:38:35 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Are you suggesting there is an exception for buen y buena?



There is more emotional content in the first phrase, so the adjective goes first

" él tiene un buen punto"
" él tiene una clase buena"

He has a good point.
He has a good class.


For example:

Tengo un viejo amigo.
Tengo un amigo viejo.

The first is more emotional- I have a longtime friend.
The second is more factual - I have an old friend.

  • Jump to: