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OnceDear
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OnceDear
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June 13th, 2018 at 1:06:07 PM permalink
Quote: michael99000

Come on.... you couldn’t come up with an annoyingly over-descriptive way of saying white toast ?

Lol.
Goujons de pain grillé

If it makes you feel better, the coffee was Americano

Don't you guys have Jelly Babies?

And yes, the flamboyant description of my dinner was indeed cut and paste from the Menu.

Don't tell me you guys don't have Dauphinois Potatoes (Sliced potatoes baked in a creamy sauce with garlic and cheese for flavor*)

I suppose you don't have Doom Bar Amber Ale either.

It was the first time I've had baby leeks. There was also asparagus, courgette, broccoli, wild mushrooms and something which I think was a 1 inch diameter baby turnip ( Something else new to me )

*There, I used US spellings in deference to our host
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gamerfreak
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June 13th, 2018 at 1:10:32 PM permalink
Quote: OnceDear

Don't tell me you guys don't have Dauphinois Potatoes (Sliced potatoes baked in a creamy sauce with garlic and cheese for flavor*)


Those are Potatos Au Gratin
Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
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June 13th, 2018 at 1:16:10 PM permalink
I've eaten more food today.
DUHHIIIIIIIII HEARD THAT!
OnceDear
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OnceDear
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June 13th, 2018 at 1:18:19 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

What is a Jelly Baby?

Also, what exactly is a Lolly? I don't want any Americans to refer to a lollipop, I've heard the term used differently in the UK and Australia.


Jelly Babies

A lolly. Well, it's slang for lollipop, but I think that's what you guys call a popsicle.
In the UK it would usually be an ice lolly: Frozen fruit juice on a stick, sold from an ice cream van. Could also describe the hard candy on a stick such as Chupa Chup

Lolly is also archaic slang for money as in "Her dad's got a lot of lolly"
If you are enjoying the game, you're already winning.
OnceDear
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OnceDear
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June 13th, 2018 at 1:26:12 PM permalink
Quote: gamerfreak

Quote: OnceDear

Don't tell me you guys don't have Dauphinois Potatoes (Sliced potatoes baked in a creamy sauce with garlic and cheese for flavor*)


Those are Potatos Au Gratin

Indeed. the Dauphinois description is equally French and the more popular description here. It's a close call.
Funny how our fancy restarants love to use french or any other 'posh' sounding language. Gravy is far too common to say, so they give us 'jus'

Posh restaurants seldom say "Beef and assorted vegetables with gravy". That would sound far too common.

We nearly went to the local chippy* instead for "Fish in batter, large chips and mushy peas"

* I don't suppose you guys have Fish and Chip shops either? We tried "Fish and Chips" when we went to Epcot. Amusingly close to what we expected.
If you are enjoying the game, you're already winning.
gamerfreak
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June 13th, 2018 at 1:35:05 PM permalink
Quote: OnceDear

Quote: gamerfreak

Quote: OnceDear

Don't tell me you guys don't have Dauphinois Potatoes (Sliced potatoes baked in a creamy sauce with garlic and cheese for flavor*)


Those are Potatos Au Gratin

Indeed. the Dauphinois description is equally French and the more popular description here. It's a close call.
Funny how our fancy restarants love to use french or any other 'posh' sounding language. Gravy is far too common to say, so they give us 'jus'

Posh restaurants seldom say "Beef and assorted vegetables with gravy". That would sound far too common.

We nearly went to the local chippy* instead for "Fish in batter, large chips and mushy peas"

* I don't suppose you guys have Fish and Chip shops either? We tried "Fish and Chips" when we went to Epcot. Amusingly close to what we expected.


Jus or Au'Jus means something different than gravy here. It's not thick or creamy and is generally served with a beef sandwich.

Fish and chips is also popular here, but it's the only time you'll hear Americans call french fries chips. Gordon Ramsay has a fish and chip restaurant at the Linq in vegas.
Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
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RogerKint
June 13th, 2018 at 1:36:01 PM permalink
I'm about to eat MORE food!
DUHHIIIIIIIII HEARD THAT!
EvenBob
EvenBob
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June 13th, 2018 at 1:36:53 PM permalink
I'm having homemade chili for dinner.
I could post an ingredient by ingredient
description and include words like
'savory' and 'Fresh' and 'cooked to
perfection', but I'm eating it, not
selling it.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
OnceDear
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OnceDear
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June 13th, 2018 at 1:57:48 PM permalink
Quote: gamerfreak

Jus or Au'Jus means something different than gravy here. It's not thick or creamy and is generally served with a beef sandwich.

Fish and chips is also popular here, but it's the only time you'll hear Americans call french fries chips. Gordon Ramsay has a fish and chip restaurant at the Linq in vegas.



Yes, 'jus' is diiferent to what my parents would think of as gravy. it's usually more runny and often flavoured with wine. More like 'meat juice' Which sounds pretty gross to me.

I'll ask about your country's interpretation of chips/french fries, which are considered quite different things here. (We'll set aside the thought of your use of 'chips' to mean potato crisps)

French fries are what we get from the likes of McDonalds: Potatoes cut to square profile of around 7mm thickness and often quite long. Generally deep fried in vegetable oil (rape seed, sunflower, or similar)

To us, chips are a lot chunkier and cut to 13-18mm thickness. The best chips are hand cut and not uniform in size and then deep fried in beef fat (dripping) or pork fat (lard). Chip shops of my youth always used hard beef fat, but just because it was deemed 'bad for us' and possibly because it's more expensive, beef fat or pigs lard has fallen out of favour commercially. Bloody delicious at home though.
The rather posh restaurant that I went to tonight does the best chips I've ever eaten outside my own home. I think they blanch them and twice fry them. Most restaurant's here use frozen pre-cut chips which are an abomination. Pretty much every UK town and village has one or many proper 'Fish and chip' shops, though some are awful places that sell kebabs, pizza, french fries etc. The best UK chippies tend to be owned and run by families of Italian, Greek or Cypriot ethnicity.

Oh, and assuming Gordon Ramsey is not a member here, can I call him a p***k?

Every bloody episode he does is to the same script and he's absolutely not a well respected chef here. The b*****n puts oil in the water he boils pasta in. A disgrace :o)
Last edited by: OnceDear on Jun 13, 2018
If you are enjoying the game, you're already winning.
OnceDear
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OnceDear
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June 13th, 2018 at 2:03:44 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

I'm having homemade chili for dinner.
I could post an ingredient by ingredient
description and include words like
'savory' and 'Fresh' and 'cooked to
perfection', but I'm eating it, not
selling it.

Hope you enjoy it. I suppose you don't like fancy restaurants with their overpriced, over described pretentious nonsense. Fair enough. Variety is the spice of life. Spice is not to everyone's taste.
If you are enjoying the game, you're already winning.

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