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DRich
DRich
Joined: Jul 6, 2012
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January 15th, 2021 at 11:47:08 AM permalink
Quote: gamerfreak

What else would you slice up to mix with Kraft Mac n Cheese?



Mac & cheese with sliced up hot dogs in it was main cuisine through college. That and Baco soup.
Living longer does not always infer +EV
TumblingBones
TumblingBones
Joined: Dec 25, 2016
  • Threads: 28
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Thanks for this post from:
unJon
January 15th, 2021 at 1:47:20 PM permalink
I know that when it comes to hot dogs, like with pizza, every part of the country has it's regional preference. I also know that tastes vary from person to person. However despite that I will now do you all the favor of educating you in regards to what the best hot dog in the country world is and how it is correctly prepared
Never EVER boil or microwave a hot dog unless you plan on using for some purpose other than eating


So far I've seen members express a preference for Ball Park, Sabretts, Hebrew National or Nathans. All are IMHO pretty good choices when The Worlds Best Hot Dog is not available. All are pretty well known and easy to obtain anywhere in the U.S. (my apologies to those forum members in other lands for taking a US-centric view but hey, we're talking hot dogs here, not haggis, lasagne, or sushi). So what is the best? Well before I reveal the answer I want to clear up some confusion and mythology re the origins of the tube steak. Specifically, the truth about Nathans.

Nathans is indeed a Coney Island institution but they were NOT the ones responsible for making the hot dog an American staple. That honor goes to Feltman's which was founded on Coney Island in 1867. It was Charles Feltman who had the idea of inserting a frankfurter in a specially-made bun which could easily be held and eaten on the street or at the beach. Feltman called it a Coney Island red hot. Nathan's was started 50 years later by Nathan Handwerker who worked at Feltmans. What Nathan and his heirs were very good at was marketing (e.g., the annual 4th of July Hot Dog eating contest) and sales (he charged a nickel less than Feltman). Feltman's closed in 1954 but re-opened in 2017 in the original location. You won't find their dogs in the local market but you can order them on the or from Amazon. If you like Nathan's dogs you might want to order some Feltman's and compare.

Or you can skip over both Nathan's and Feltman's and go directly to The Worlds Best Hot Dog without passing Go. The WBHD award goes to the Zweigle's Pop-Open. Zweigle's was founded in 1880 in Rochester NY. To give you an idea of how big a deal these hot dogs are in Rochester, back in the 60s when McDonalds and Burger King first tried to open restaurants in the Rochester metro are they found that people just weren't interested in what they had on the menu. I even remember a Burger King that for several years offered hot dogs on the menu just to get folks in the door.

Zweigle, like Feltman, was German who emigrated to the U.S. In the 1920s some folks in Rochester's German community came up with the idea of an un-smoked "white hot" as a cheaper alternative to red hot. Zweigle's added them to their product line in 1925 and you can now get both at Wegman's or from NewYorkStyleDeli.com. They even have a combo pack (3 reds and 3 whites). Just make sure you get the Pop Opens and not the skinless.

For those who think I'm biased and/or exaggerating, I would simply say try them before you judge. I've lived in 6 states on both the East and West coasts and always made a point of bringing back some Zweigle's after every visit back to Rochester and then inviting my friends over for beer and dogs. The reviews were always 100% unanimous. Everyone said these really were the best dogs they ever had.

Finally, there's the issue of how to cook these. Never ever steam or microwave a pop-open! You should only grill or broil. The natural casing will char and then eventually pop-open (hence the name):


As to toppings anything goes but in the Rochester dinners and hot dog stands, in addition to ketchup and mustard, folks like to add hot sauce (also known as "meat sauce". It's hard to describe (it's not really hot and is sort of like a Sloppy Joe mix) but you can either buy some from the same stores that sell the Zeigle products or you can make your own. If you're really hunger and not worried about your arteries, try making a Garbage Plate. There are various versions but all look something like this:

My wife would kill me if I ate one (assuming I didn't die in the attempt) but they're a big deal with the college students in Rochester.

Enjoy.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
SOOPOO
SOOPOO
Joined: Aug 8, 2010
  • Threads: 110
  • Posts: 7808
January 15th, 2021 at 1:59:41 PM permalink
I’ve had Zweigle’s. I like Hebrew National and Nathans more.

Could not agree more on need to grill or broil all hot dogs. I do make the exception for Sabrett’s on street corner in NYC.
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
Joined: Oct 10, 2012
  • Threads: 149
  • Posts: 19182
January 15th, 2021 at 2:42:48 PM permalink
Quote: TumblingBones

I know that when it comes to hot dogs, like with pizza, every part of the country has it's regional preference. I also know that tastes vary from person to person. However despite that I will now do you all the favor of educating you in regards to what the best hot dog in the country world is and how it is correctly prepared

Never EVER boil or microwave a hot dog unless you plan on using for some purpose other than eating


So far I've seen members express a preference for Ball Park, Sabretts, Hebrew National or Nathans. All are IMHO pretty good choices when The Worlds Best Hot Dog is not available. All are pretty well known and easy to obtain anywhere in the U.S. (my apologies to those forum members in other lands for taking a US-centric view but hey, we're talking hot dogs here, not haggis, lasagne, or sushi). So what is the best? Well before I reveal the answer I want to clear up some confusion and mythology re the origins of the tube steak. Specifically, the truth about Nathans.

Nathans is indeed a Coney Island institution but they were NOT the ones responsible for making the hot dog an American staple. That honor goes to Feltman's which was founded on Coney Island in 1867. It was Charles Feltman who had the idea of inserting a frankfurter in a specially-made bun which could easily be held and eaten on the street or at the beach. Feltman called it a Coney Island red hot. Nathan's was started 50 years later by Nathan Handwerker who worked at Feltmans. What Nathan and his heirs were very good at was marketing (e.g., the annual 4th of July Hot Dog eating contest) and sales (he charged a nickel less than Feltman). Feltman's closed in 1954 but re-opened in 2017 in the original location. You won't find their dogs in the local market but you can order them on the or from Amazon. If you like Nathan's dogs you might want to order some Feltman's and compare.

Or you can skip over both Nathan's and Feltman's and go directly to The Worlds Best Hot Dog without passing Go. The WBHD award goes to the Zweigle's Pop-Open. Zweigle's was founded in 1880 in Rochester NY. To give you an idea of how big a deal these hot dogs are in Rochester, back in the 60s when McDonalds and Burger King first tried to open restaurants in the Rochester metro are they found that people just weren't interested in what they had on the menu. I even remember a Burger King that for several years offered hot dogs on the menu just to get folks in the door.

Zweigle, like Feltman, was German who emigrated to the U.S. In the 1920s some folks in Rochester's German community came up with the idea of an un-smoked "white hot" as a cheaper alternative to red hot. Zweigle's added them to their product line in 1925 and you can now get both at Wegman's or from NewYorkStyleDeli.com. They even have a combo pack (3 reds and 3 whites). Just make sure you get the Pop Opens and not the skinless.

For those who think I'm biased and/or exaggerating, I would simply say try them before you judge. I've lived in 6 states on both the East and West coasts and always made a point of bringing back some Zweigle's after every visit back to Rochester and then inviting my friends over for beer and dogs. The reviews were always 100% unanimous. Everyone said these really were the best dogs they ever had.

Finally, there's the issue of how to cook these. Never ever steam or microwave a pop-open! You should only grill or broil. The natural casing will char and then eventually pop-open (hence the name):


As to toppings anything goes but in the Rochester dinners and hot dog stands, in addition to ketchup and mustard, folks like to add hot sauce (also known as "meat sauce". It's hard to describe (it's not really hot and is sort of like a Sloppy Joe mix) but you can either buy some from the same stores that sell the Zeigle products or you can make your own. If you're really hunger and not worried about your arteries, try making a Garbage Plate. There are various versions but all look something like this:

My wife would kill me if I ate one (assuming I didn't die in the attempt) but they're a big deal with the college students in Rochester.

Enjoy.

I'm not sure who would eat that last plate of food, but it looks like something that you would be getting ready to take out to the pig's trough.
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
TumblingBones
TumblingBones
Joined: Dec 25, 2016
  • Threads: 28
  • Posts: 438
January 15th, 2021 at 2:50:02 PM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

Quote: TumblingBones

If you're really hunger and not worried about your arteries, try making a Garbage Plate. There are various versions but all look something like this:

My wife would kill me if I ate one (assuming I didn't die in the attempt) but they're a big deal with the college students in Rochester.

Enjoy.

I'm not sure who would eat that last plate of food, but it looks like something that you would be getting ready to take out to the pig's trough.


One of the local traditions is the "Garbage Plate Run". Several variations but the nastiest is you run 2 miles to the restaurant, eat a Garbage Plate as fast as you can, then run 2 miles back to the finish line.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
  • Threads: 428
  • Posts: 24707
January 15th, 2021 at 4:38:25 PM permalink
Never would have thought of this,
it's a Martha Stewart idea. Took
the leftover chili and mixed in
half a package of cream cheese.
Heated in the micro for a few
minutes till the cheese melted.

Took a bowl of green leaf lettuce
and baby spinach and mixed in the
chili until all the leaves were coated.
I was surprised at how good this was,
a warm yet not wilted salad. Thank
you Martha Stewart.



She was a model in the 60's and was
on the cover of lots of mags.


"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
billryan
billryan 
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 178
  • Posts: 10446
January 15th, 2021 at 10:07:20 PM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

Quote: TumblingBones

I know that when it comes to hot dogs, like with pizza, every part of the country has it's regional preference. I also know that tastes vary from person to person. However despite that I will now do you all the favor of educating you in regards to what the best hot dog in the country world is and how it is correctly prepared

Never EVER boil or microwave a hot dog unless you plan on using for some purpose other than eating


So far I've seen members express a preference for Ball Park, Sabretts, Hebrew National or Nathans. All are IMHO pretty good choices when The Worlds Best Hot Dog is not available. All are pretty well known and easy to obtain anywhere in the U.S. (my apologies to those forum members in other lands for taking a US-centric view but hey, we're talking hot dogs here, not haggis, lasagne, or sushi). So what is the best? Well before I reveal the answer I want to clear up some confusion and mythology re the origins of the tube steak. Specifically, the truth about Nathans.

Nathans is indeed a Coney Island institution but they were NOT the ones responsible for making the hot dog an American staple. That honor goes to Feltman's which was founded on Coney Island in 1867. It was Charles Feltman who had the idea of inserting a frankfurter in a specially-made bun which could easily be held and eaten on the street or at the beach. Feltman called it a Coney Island red hot. Nathan's was started 50 years later by Nathan Handwerker who worked at Feltmans. What Nathan and his heirs were very good at was marketing (e.g., the annual 4th of July Hot Dog eating contest) and sales (he charged a nickel less than Feltman). Feltman's closed in 1954 but re-opened in 2017 in the original location. You won't find their dogs in the local market but you can order them on the or from Amazon. If you like Nathan's dogs you might want to order some Feltman's and compare.

Or you can skip over both Nathan's and Feltman's and go directly to The Worlds Best Hot Dog without passing Go. The WBHD award goes to the Zweigle's Pop-Open. Zweigle's was founded in 1880 in Rochester NY. To give you an idea of how big a deal these hot dogs are in Rochester, back in the 60s when McDonalds and Burger King first tried to open restaurants in the Rochester metro are they found that people just weren't interested in what they had on the menu. I even remember a Burger King that for several years offered hot dogs on the menu just to get folks in the door.

Zweigle, like Feltman, was German who emigrated to the U.S. In the 1920s some folks in Rochester's German community came up with the idea of an un-smoked "white hot" as a cheaper alternative to red hot. Zweigle's added them to their product line in 1925 and you can now get both at Wegman's or from NewYorkStyleDeli.com. They even have a combo pack (3 reds and 3 whites). Just make sure you get the Pop Opens and not the skinless.

For those who think I'm biased and/or exaggerating, I would simply say try them before you judge. I've lived in 6 states on both the East and West coasts and always made a point of bringing back some Zweigle's after every visit back to Rochester and then inviting my friends over for beer and dogs. The reviews were always 100% unanimous. Everyone said these really were the best dogs they ever had.

Finally, there's the issue of how to cook these. Never ever steam or microwave a pop-open! You should only grill or broil. The natural casing will char and then eventually pop-open (hence the name):


As to toppings anything goes but in the Rochester dinners and hot dog stands, in addition to ketchup and mustard, folks like to add hot sauce (also known as "meat sauce". It's hard to describe (it's not really hot and is sort of like a Sloppy Joe mix) but you can either buy some from the same stores that sell the Zeigle products or you can make your own. If you're really hunger and not worried about your arteries, try making a Garbage Plate. There are various versions but all look something like this:

My wife would kill me if I ate one (assuming I didn't die in the attempt) but they're a big deal with the college students in Rochester.

Enjoy.

I'm not sure who would eat that last plate of food, but it looks like something that you would be getting ready to take out to the pig's trough.




Having gone to school in Rochester, the only time we would even think about these was after a night of hard drinking. The bars close at
2AM and they were pretty much the only thing open. Garbage plates are like White Castles. An outstanding litmus test. If you find yourself wanting them, you probably shouldn't be driving.
I loved hot dogs. I still do but I realize I can only eat a couple a few times a year.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
  • Threads: 428
  • Posts: 24707
January 16th, 2021 at 12:44:55 AM permalink
Quote: SOOPOO

Could not agree more on need to grill or broil all hot dogs.



I never do either. I put three or four in a small frying pan. tiny amount of oil. and under medium heat I constantly roll the dogs back and forth back and forth until they have an even color and are plumped-up. Maximum flavor.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
billryan
billryan 
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 178
  • Posts: 10446
January 16th, 2021 at 1:22:45 AM permalink
I used to fill a frying pan with enough water to cover the dogs, heat it on high, let the water boil away and then throw some butter into the pan to sear the outside. Take the dogs out of the pan and put the open rolls face down in the pan until they hardened. top with spicey mustard and some crumbled potato chips and snack away.
On a very rare occasion, I buy a bottle of onions in a sauce but the only ones I really liked were the Sabrett brand and they were hard to find. At our community cookouts, we usually have brats, which I'm not crazy about.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
  • Threads: 428
  • Posts: 24707
January 16th, 2021 at 4:31:52 PM permalink
Fried fish with homemade tartar sauce
with sauteed baby spinach on a lettuce
wrap.

"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal

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