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EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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March 13th, 2012 at 12:08:32 AM permalink
Are you fascinated by words? I am, always have been.
I was watching a commercial where they used the word
'whopping'. I've heard the word all my life so I looked it
up. My gosh, it goes back to 13th century England and
started out meaning a thumping, to strike forcibly. It
later came to mean larger than normal, 'we caught four
whopping fish'. A whopping lie. A whopper of a lie. Burger
King makes The Whopper.

I love words..
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
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March 13th, 2012 at 3:44:23 AM permalink
How about "to let" as to allow. It originally meant to prevent. And to this day... it is still used as to prevent in every mortgage.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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March 13th, 2012 at 7:58:02 AM permalink
Quote: FleaStiff

How about "to let" as to allow. It originally meant to prevent. .



How about a 'Room to Let' sign on a house. Let has many
uses. Let down, let in, let off, let on, let out. Archaic version
means to hinder, prevent, or obstruct. It dates to before 900 AD
in England. It also has different meanings when used in the law.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
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March 13th, 2012 at 8:01:37 AM permalink
I like how "inflammable" used to mean "unflammable" and has come to mean "flammable".
NO KILL I
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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March 13th, 2012 at 8:12:07 AM permalink
Quote: Mosca

I like how "inflammable" used to mean "unflammable" and has come to mean "flammable".



You're right, I never thought about that. Inflammable and flammable
mean the same thing now. You have words like:

likely - unlikely

understood - misunderstood

complete - incomplete

modest - immodest

reversible - irreversible

logical - illogical

They all mean the opposite. But not flammable and
inflammable. When you add a prefix, its supposed
to change the word. Otherwise, whats the point.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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March 13th, 2012 at 8:27:50 AM permalink
Sandbagging is an interesting word. It means to
hold back to gain an advantage. Its a 19th century
poker term for somebody who doesn't raise when
he has a good hand, but 'sandbags' everybody and
clobbers them at the right time. We call it check
raising now. Sandbagging comes from the docks
in England where a robber would fill a sock with
sand and use it to knock victims unconscious.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
weaselman
weaselman
Joined: Jul 11, 2010
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March 13th, 2012 at 8:45:04 AM permalink
And why do people park in driveways, but drive on parkways?
"When two people always agree one of them is unnecessary"
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
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March 13th, 2012 at 9:40:06 AM permalink
Quote: Mosca

I like how "inflammable" used to mean "unflammable" and has come to mean "flammable".



I'm very sure that's not the case. The dictionary doesn't help much, but inflammable comes from a latin word meaning "to inflame." And "inflame" emans "to kindle" and also "to arouse passions." In any case, there are other related words, all with meanings related to light a fire or to swell, or to arouse passions, such as "inflamatory" and "inflamation."

But let's see what Paco has to say.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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March 13th, 2012 at 10:19:45 AM permalink
Look at the term 'four flusher'. It means a phony,
a scammer. Its a 19th century poker term. If you
had 4 cards of one suit, and tried to pretend you had
a 5 card flush to scare off the other players, you
were a scoundrel, a four flusher.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
dwheatley
dwheatley
Joined: Nov 16, 2009
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March 13th, 2012 at 10:23:21 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I'm very sure that's not the case. The dictionary doesn't help much, but inflammable comes from a latin word meaning "to inflame." And "inflame" emans "to kindle" and also "to arouse passions." In any case, there are other related words, all with meanings related to light a fire or to swell, or to arouse passions, such as "inflamatory" and "inflamation."

But let's see what Paco has to say.



http://www.etymonline.com is your friend for all these fun inquiries. It's from Lation: inflammare, which means "to set on fire, kindle," figuratively "to rouse, excite,"
Wisdom is the quality that keeps you out of situations where you would otherwise need it

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