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avianrandy
avianrandy
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Gialmere
May 7th, 2022 at 7:27:48 PM permalink
I only know number 1 and cemetery are always next to churches.graveyards are not
Wizard
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May 7th, 2022 at 10:11:15 PM permalink
Quote: avianrandy

I only know number 1 and cemetery are always next to churches.graveyards are not

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I did not know that.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Gialmere
Gialmere
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May 10th, 2022 at 8:47:32 PM permalink


Time to reap the graveyard trivia answers...



Today the terms are synonymous. Historically, however, a graveyard is part of a churchyard while a cemetery is not. Also, graveyards do not contain cremated remains while cemeteries usually do.

Note that this claim is disputed by Snopes so "same thing" is probably the best answer. (Also see #12 below.)

Like #1 above, today these terms are synonymous. Technically speaking...

A head stone is what most people visualize when thinking of a cemetery. It's a stone slab placed vertically at the head of the grave, usually with the person's name, birth and death dates and perhaps an epitaph inscribed on it.

A gravestone is a stone slab placed horizontally on top of a grave, often surrounded by railing. Like a headstone, the person's name and dates are usually inscribed on it.

A tombstone comes from the old days when coffins were made of stone. The actual tombstone was the lid of the coffin. The lid might be plain or, for rich people, elaborately carved, sometimes including a life size statue of the person posed as if sleeping.




In general, graves are oriented to face east towards the rising sun. This symbolizes rebirth. The practice seems to have begun with the sun worshiping pagans. Christians kept the tradition adding that when the dead rise on Judgement Day they will be facing the second coming.

It is by no means a hard, fast rule. For example, modern cemeteries with a "winding path through the park" style of landscaping might have graves facing in any direction. Grave orientation may also be the result of making the most efficient use of available graveyard space. It is not considered disrespectful to have graves facing directions other that east although it's something you might want to consider when purchasing a burial plot.



Taphophiles are people who enjoy visiting cemeteries. They take pictures, make grave rubbings (a practice now frowned upon) and learn the history of the site and its more famous occupants. Other terms for taphophiles include "Tombstone Tourists," "Graveyard Groupies" and (more politely) "Cemetery Enthusiasts".





It was the home of Robert E. Lee. More accurately it was the home of Lee's wife, Mary Anna Custis Lee, who was the great-granddaughter of Martha Custis Washington, who married George Washington after her first husband died.

During the Civil War, Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs was tasked with the creation of new burial sites for fallen soldiers. Meigs gleefully chose Arlington estate as a new site serving as poetic justice against Lee for all the Union dead.



You'd be at Mount Everest. Many people have died while climbing Everest. Usually these unfortunate mountaineers are brought down by other members of their expeditions or by a search party. However, it's estimated that more than 200 bodies are still up there. Either the climber was lost and no one knows where the body is, or the location is known but is at an inaccessible place that's too dangerous for a recovery operation.

These 200+ frozen solid corpses make up what Everest climbers call "The Graveyard in the Clouds". Some of the bodies that can be seen act as landmarks along the route to the summit. They get nicknames like "Green Boots", "Sleeping Beauty" and "The German Woman". Sometimes the bodies stick around, but often, after a few years of wind and weather, they slide down the slope to ... somewhere.



The Catacombs of Paris came about as an effort to deal with the city's overflowing cemeteries. Like all big cities, real estate becomes too valuable to waist on the dead. Yet, as the population increases, so does the need to put the dead somewhere. For Paris the solution came in the form of its ancient stone quarries which had an extensive tunnel network under the city. So, for two straight years starting in 1786, covered carts would discreetly carry the bones of the cemeteries to the Catacombs during the night.

Being French, they eventually added artistic touches to the interment, making walls of bones with skulls accentuating things in geometrical patterns. Today it's one of Paris' biggest tourist attractions, a must see for taphophiles although skittish people should probably visit the Lourve instead.



The Seven New Wonders of the World were named in 2007. They are Machu Picchu, Chichen Itza, Petra, the Taj Mahal, the Roman Colosseum, the Great Wall of China, and Christ the Redeemer. Of these, only the Taj Mahal was built for the dead. It's a mausoleum but, despite its size, is designed to hold only two people. It was commissioned in 1632 by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan to house the tomb of his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal; it also houses the tomb of Shah Jahan himself.

Thus, the Taj is essentially a monument to eternal love transcending death.





Angels in various poses are standard cemetery decor. A flying angel symbolizes the ascent to heaven. An angel blowing a horn symbolizes resurrection on Judgement Day. A weeping angel symbolizes a life cut short, usually a teenager or young adult whose potential will never be realized. Other symbols of this type include a flower with a broken stem or a chopped down tree.

Of course, anyone at any age could end up with a weeping angel their grave as an expression of profound grief from their loved ones.



That would be a lamb. It symbolizes innocence and purity. Other common symbols for children include an empty chair or bed with a pair of shoes next to it. This represents a life that never really got to happen at all.

If you're ever depressed about your own lot in life you might try visiting the children's section of your local cemetery. Seeing the graves of kids whose entire time on earth is measured in days will straighten out your perspective real quick.



A cenotaph is an empty tomb or a monument erected in honor of a person or group of people whose remains are elsewhere. Historically it is most common for fallen soldiers who died and were buried in far off lands, or for people who were lost at sea. It provides an actual physical location for mourners to visit and express their grief. A cenotaph may also mark the spot where a (usually famous) person was originally buried but whose remains were removed and reinterred elsewhere.

Note: If you're wondering about the frequent use of the word "taph" (as in "epitaph," "taphophile" and "cenotaph"), it comes from the Greek word "taphos" meaning "tomb" or "grave".



There is a long history of soldiers and coins starting with the ancient Greeks who would place coins in the mouths of their fallen warriors so they could pay the ferryman to take them across the river Styx. The coin system above seems to have developed during the Vietnam era. As the war was very divisive, it was a way for soldiers to communicate with the fallen soldier's family without possibly upsetting them with an actual visit.

Note: Some people dispute the coin system above. (Also see #1 above.)


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Meanwhile...



Country music singer Mickey Gilley died last Saturday in Branson, Missouri. He was 86. No cause of death was released although he did finish a tour last month then cancelled some new shows citing health issues.

Gilley, a cousin of rock legend Jerry Lee Lewis, had 39 Top 10 country hits over the course of his career, including 17 No. 1 records. He also did some acting in such shows as “Murder, She Wrote” and “The Dukes of Hazzard.” He's probably best known for his famous honky tonk "Gilley's" that was located in Pasadena, Texas. An Esquire article about the nightspot inspired the 1980 John Travolta film “Urban Cowboy,” which was filmed at the bar and gave rise to a nationwide trend of pearl snap shirts, longneck beers and mechanical bulls.

Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
Wizard
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May 10th, 2022 at 9:26:25 PM permalink
Great quiz G! I learned a lot, but also feel okay about what I did know.

About the children's graves, I may have written about this before, but the main cemetery in Parowan UT is full of graves of children and young adults. Not all of them, but very disproportionate compared to other cemeteries. My question to the forum is why?

About Martha Washington, I am also a direct descendant of her. She had children via her first husband. George, despite being a very manly man, was not capable of fathering children.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Gialmere
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May 14th, 2022 at 2:53:44 PM permalink


A publicist for Fred Ward announced that the actor died on May 8. He was 79. No location or cause of death was announced.

Ward began his career in 1979 alongside Clint Eastwood as his jailbreak buddy in “Escape From Alcatraz.” The Golden Globe winner is probably best known for playing astronaut Gus Grissom in "The Right Stuff" (1983), and starring with Kevin Bacon in the horror comedy movie "Tremors" (1990). He had the lead role in "Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins" (1985) which didn't do well at the box office. Other notable films include “Southern Comfort” (1981), “Uncommon Valor” (1983), “Joe Dirt” (2001) and “Sweet Home Alabama” (2002). His last role was on HBO's "True Detective" show.



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In an update, the Mob Museum weighs in on the barrel body found in Lake Mead...



Meanwhile, the skeletal remains of another body has been found in the lake. For this one, no foul play is suspected. The early speculation is that it was a swimmer who drowned. The remains are only a skull and a few bones so authorities are hoping to ID the body through dental records.
Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
Gialmere
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smoothgrh
May 18th, 2022 at 6:16:11 PM permalink


It's been announced that Rosmarie Trapp died last Thursday in in Morrisville, Vermont. She was 93. No cause of death was disclosed but she is said to have gone peacefully surrounded by loved ones.

You probably have no idea who she is but you most likely know the famous story that she played a small part in. Trapp's family lived in a village on the outskirts of Salzburg, Austria. Her father was a u-boat captain in the first world war. He had seven children at the time of the death of his first wife. He then hired a young woman postulant, Maria Augusta Kutschera, from the local Abby to help educate his kids. This eventually led to marriage and, since both the Captain and Maria had musical backgrounds, they started a performing act called the von "Trapp Family Singers". Eventually, as the Nazis took over, the family fled Austria (and ended up owning an inn in Vermont where they entertained guests with their singing).

Sound familiar?

So how does Rosmarie fit in? She was the first of three children from the Captain's second marriage to Baroness Maria Augusta von Trapp. Neither she nor her two full siblings are depicted in the famous Rodgers and Hammerstein musical although the von Trapp family actually fled Austria when she was 9 years old. With Rosmarie's passing, her youngest sibling Johannes (82) is last living member of the famous von Trapp family.

The Nazis made use of the abandoned von Trapp home as Heinrich Himmler's headquarters.
Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
smoothgrh
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May 18th, 2022 at 8:50:13 PM permalink
One of the reasons that I've wanted to visit Vermont is to visit Stowe, VT — the town with the von Trapp's relocated home.

And the Ben & Jerry's factory tour. And to get some Bernie merch.
billryan
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May 19th, 2022 at 12:11:25 AM permalink
In the early 80s, I took my Mom on a long road trip to Arcadia via Lake Placid. She was a big Sound of Music fan so we had planned on stopping by their Lodge. It was late September and the trees were all changing colors so the ride was nice, but when we got to the lodge, it was gone. It had burned down a year before and they hadn't broken ground on the new one. They had a small gift shop and the woman working was a family member but not one of the kids in the movie.
I've only heard good things about the family, even in the movie is very fictionalized.
Beautiful country up there.
The difference between fiction and reality is that fiction is supposed to make sense.

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