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AitchTheLetter
AitchTheLetter
Joined: May 28, 2022
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July 8th, 2022 at 5:30:11 AM permalink
Desalination creates more issues than it has the potential to fix. The concentrated brine left over from the process can be harmful to local sea life and has no real practical use.
Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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July 8th, 2022 at 5:36:29 AM permalink
In the Vegas heyday, I'm sure casinos would have just trucked in all the water needed for guests anyway no matter the drought situation. And probably provide it for employees and their families. The rest of Vegas could dry up I suppose.
The Hall of Unverified Claims is a vast place with many shelves.
Gundy
Gundy
Joined: Feb 25, 2021
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July 8th, 2022 at 6:46:29 AM permalink
Quote: AlanMendelson

The coming electricity crisis is a huge issue that has gotten too little attention.

It's the electricity problem that is preventing new industry from moving here to Nevada and even to other states.

It's the real reason companies are relocating.

The next "in demand market" for development will be the Northeast where there's plenty of water.

The rust belt will rise again.
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There is no reason to panic. At least there is no push to eliminate ICE vehicles, and force everyone to drive EVs. Our leaders are too smart to do something like that.
AlanMendelson
AlanMendelson 
Joined: Oct 5, 2011
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July 8th, 2022 at 9:48:40 AM permalink
Quote: Gundy

Quote: AlanMendelson

The coming electricity crisis is a huge issue that has gotten too little attention.

It's the electricity problem that is preventing new industry from moving here to Nevada and even to other states.

It's the real reason companies are relocating.

The next "in demand market" for development will be the Northeast where there's plenty of water.

The rust belt will rise again.
link to original post



There is no reason to panic. At least there is no push to eliminate ICE vehicles, and force everyone to drive EVs. Our leaders are too smart to do something like that.
link to original post



Our leaders missed the boat twenty years ago.

When I went to COLLEGE in the early 1970s the experts knew the southwest would run out of water and power. Three Mile Island and the anti nuclear power groups sealed our fate. It's too late to fix.
MrV
MrV
Joined: Feb 13, 2010
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July 8th, 2022 at 10:53:21 AM permalink
I've longed suggested pumping water from the Columbia River to Lake Shasta, and have it sent south from there via existing canals / pipes.

This suggestion meets with surprising political resistance; someone told me he read that there is now discussion about pumping water west from the Mississippi River.

Whatever, the water is there, and if you only pump it during times of high / excess flow there should be no negative effect on the fisheries in the Columbia.
"What, me worry?"
Ace2
Ace2
Joined: Oct 2, 2017
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July 8th, 2022 at 10:53:25 AM permalink
Except from City of Phoenix site

“What is the status of Phoenix's water supply?

Phoenix's water supply is in very good shape. Even though Phoenix remains in a regional period of climatic drought that began in 2000, our water supply is not dependent on annual precipitation events. Our water supply originates as snow pack far north and east of the Valley that melts and flows into vast reservoirs that store it for delivery during low-flow years

How can Phoenix 's water supply be so good, when I keep hearing about drought and other areas that are considering water restrictions?

Phoenix has had a hundred years of sure-handed water management. Extremely wise planning for drought in the desert and the fact that we have several water sources has kept Phoenix way ahead of the drought curve for decades. Phoenix diversified its water portfolio long ago and amended the city code to promote reuse of water and water conservation​

Are mandatory water use restrictions coming soon? What happens to our water supply if drought continues for a long time?

Even though it is usually dry in the Valley, Phoenix will not need to impose mandatory water use restrictions in the foreseeable future. If, during the next ten-to-fifteen years, the west were to experience widespread drought conditions that are as bad or worse than we’ve seen over the past fifteen years,, the reduction of available water supplies on the Colorado and Salt/Verde Rivers may reach a point where Phoenix would initiate mandatory water use restrictions that go beyond our traditional low water use lifestyle. This gives everyone time to start preparing for such an event. Continued wise planning and water conservation remain big parts of ensuring our future water supply, especially if the regional drought lasts for a long time. Phoenix will have the water it needs, but none to waste…with your help​.”
It’s all about making that GTA
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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July 8th, 2022 at 11:43:36 AM permalink
So they’ve got the water in Phoenix, but they can’t make it cool. Can’t have everything, I guess.
The Hall of Unverified Claims is a vast place with many shelves.
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 231
  • Posts: 12761
July 8th, 2022 at 2:51:35 PM permalink
Quote: Ace2

Except from City of Phoenix site

“What is the status of Phoenix's water supply?

Phoenix's water supply is in very good shape. Even though Phoenix remains in a regional period of climatic drought that began in 2000, our water supply is not dependent on annual precipitation events. Our water supply originates as snow pack far north and east of the Valley that melts and flows into vast reservoirs that store it for delivery during low-flow years

How can Phoenix 's water supply be so good, when I keep hearing about drought and other areas that are considering water restrictions?

Phoenix has had a hundred years of sure-handed water management. Extremely wise planning for drought in the desert and the fact that we have several water sources has kept Phoenix way ahead of the drought curve for decades. Phoenix diversified its water portfolio long ago and amended the city code to promote reuse of water and water conservation​

Are mandatory water use restrictions coming soon? What happens to our water supply if drought continues for a long time?

Even though it is usually dry in the Valley, Phoenix will not need to impose mandatory water use restrictions in the foreseeable future. If, during the next ten-to-fifteen years, the west were to experience widespread drought conditions that are as bad or worse than we’ve seen over the past fifteen years,, the reduction of available water supplies on the Colorado and Salt/Verde Rivers may reach a point where Phoenix would initiate mandatory water use restrictions that go beyond our traditional low water use lifestyle. This gives everyone time to start preparing for such an event. Continued wise planning and water conservation remain big parts of ensuring our future water supply, especially if the regional drought lasts for a long time. Phoenix will have the water it needs, but none to waste…with your help​.”
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One thing I wished they would do was to prohibit HOAs from mandating lawn watering. Such a waste.
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
MrV
MrV
Joined: Feb 13, 2010
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July 8th, 2022 at 3:23:48 PM permalink
Prohibit golf courses from watering.

Have the greens made out of synthetic material and keep the rough rough, but closely mowed.

Ugly, but it could work.
"What, me worry?"
AlanMendelson
AlanMendelson 
Joined: Oct 5, 2011
  • Threads: 152
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July 8th, 2022 at 4:25:17 PM permalink
Quote: MrV

Prohibit golf courses from watering.

Have the greens made out of synthetic material and keep the rough rough, but closely mowed.

Ugly, but it could work.
link to original post



Synthetic turf? That's an interesting problem.

I'm not saying its impossible but I'm wondering about the cost.

Artificial grass is like carpet. The ground underneath must be prepared to hold it. Then the carpet must be installed and literally nailed into the ground.

Imagine being a course owner who had to replace sections of synthetic turf after divots rip into them?

I wonder what the cost would be?

I'm going to have to do a search for artificial grass golf courses. I do know of putting greens but you're not chopping into a putting green with a putter.

Gotta research this.

Update and it didnt take long. From Golf Digest:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.golfdigest.com/story/a-full-18-hole-course-of-synthetic-turf-we-surveyed-20-course-architects-about-the-future-of-design-here-are-their-predictions/amp

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