Deucekies
Deucekies
Joined: Jan 20, 2014
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January 9th, 2021 at 9:38:43 PM permalink
Quote: rdw4potus

I think 3 is right for tables. I can name several more in Vegas that allow slot recording.



That's fair. I only watch her table game videos. I find slots boring as can be.
Casinos are not your friends, they want your money. But so does Disneyland. And there is no chance in hell that you will go to Disneyland and come back with more money than you went with. - AxelWolf and Mickeycrimm
ams288
ams288
Joined: Sep 26, 2012
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Thanks for this post from:
smoothgrh
January 10th, 2021 at 12:29:58 PM permalink
Quote: rdw4potus

I think 3 is right for tables. I can name several more in Vegas that allow slot recording.



I think there are more that would allow her to film tables, but the music is too loud. She’s mentioned before how Plaza and/or El Cortez turn the music down for her when she’s live streaming to avoid YouTube’s copyright censoring technology. She said she couldn’t film tables at Golden Gate because the music is way too loud.
Ding Dong the Witch is Dead
Deucekies
Deucekies
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January 10th, 2021 at 6:54:10 PM permalink
Quote: ams288

I think there are more that would allow her to film tables, but the music is too loud. She’s mentioned before how Plaza and/or El Cortez turn the music down for her when she’s live streaming to avoid YouTube’s copyright censoring technology. She said she couldn’t film tables at Golden Gate because the music is way too loud.



There are some content creators recently who have taken it upon themselves to create copyright-safe music for streaming and production. Harris Heller and his StreamBeats come to mind. I wonder if casinos would be amenable to playing copyright-safe music when someone like Sarah is filming.
Casinos are not your friends, they want your money. But so does Disneyland. And there is no chance in hell that you will go to Disneyland and come back with more money than you went with. - AxelWolf and Mickeycrimm
ChumpChange
ChumpChange
Joined: Jun 15, 2018
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January 10th, 2021 at 7:18:24 PM permalink
The dealer has to deal to the beat and the player has to click chips in time with the music.
Vegasrider
Vegasrider
Joined: Dec 23, 2017
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January 10th, 2021 at 8:14:01 PM permalink
Quote: Deucekies

There are some content creators recently who have taken it upon themselves to create copyright-safe music for streaming and production. Harris Heller and his StreamBeats come to mind. I wonder if casinos would be amenable to playing copyright-safe music when someone like Sarah is filming.



If a business plays music, they must pay a royalty fee. But you just subscribe to one of the royalty subscriptions and you are good. Go to a sporting event, and you hear the pa playing music, that arena or stadium pays. Juke boxes in bars have already incorporated the royalty fee into the machine. Otherwise if you just decide to pop in a cd without a subscription, you are in a copy right violation.
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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January 10th, 2021 at 11:13:54 PM permalink
One might be able to play non-copyright music close to mic one is talking in to diffuse background music, but it would probably end up being irritating to the listeners.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
Deucekies
Deucekies
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January 11th, 2021 at 3:38:04 AM permalink
Quote: Vegasrider

If a business plays music, they must pay a royalty fee.



Not if the copyright owner makes the music available to anyone for free.
Casinos are not your friends, they want your money. But so does Disneyland. And there is no chance in hell that you will go to Disneyland and come back with more money than you went with. - AxelWolf and Mickeycrimm
Vegasrider
Vegasrider
Joined: Dec 23, 2017
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January 11th, 2021 at 2:05:43 PM permalink
Quote: Deucekies

Not if the copyright owner makes the music available to anyone for free.



True but why would any successful music artist do that? That is part of their revenue. If they sign with a record label, then they definitely can't. If you are a small time independent, then yes. But again, its going to be very difficult to get any airtime.
Deucekies
Deucekies
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January 14th, 2021 at 2:57:16 AM permalink
Quote: Vegasrider

True but why would any successful music artist do that? That is part of their revenue. If they sign with a record label, then they definitely can't. If you are a small time independent, then yes. But again, its going to be very difficult to get any airtime.



As I mentioned in my earlier post, there are some internet content creators who are taking on the task. They are either creating their own music, or paying others to do it and purchasing the rights to it, and uploading the music to Spotify, Apple Music, etc, where they get paid a royalty every time their songs are played. The creators are then white-listing the music on YouTube, Twitch, and other streaming platforms, making the music safe for other content creators to use without fear of a DMCA takedown.

Why are they doing it? As a service to content creators to help maintain the viability of the medium. They're not making a whole bunch of money off the music, but they're making a little bit. But DMCA takedowns threaten the streaming medium as a whole, especially as they talk about the penalties getting stiffer and stiffer.
Casinos are not your friends, they want your money. But so does Disneyland. And there is no chance in hell that you will go to Disneyland and come back with more money than you went with. - AxelWolf and Mickeycrimm
rdw4potus
rdw4potus
Joined: Mar 11, 2010
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January 14th, 2021 at 10:14:33 AM permalink
Quote: Deucekies

As I mentioned in my earlier post, there are some internet content creators who are taking on the task. They are either creating their own music, or paying others to do it and purchasing the rights to it, and uploading the music to Spotify, Apple Music, etc, where they get paid a royalty every time their songs are played. The creators are then white-listing the music on YouTube, Twitch, and other streaming platforms, making the music safe for other content creators to use without fear of a DMCA takedown.

Why are they doing it? As a service to content creators to help maintain the viability of the medium. They're not making a whole bunch of money off the music, but they're making a little bit. But DMCA takedowns threaten the streaming medium as a whole, especially as they talk about the penalties getting stiffer and stiffer.



I think it's also a bit of a loss-leader for those folks. VegasLowRoller credits his intro and outro music & links to the creators' pages. So no revenue collection for that usage, but if a viewer likes the song, they know where to go...
"So as the clock ticked and the day passed, opportunity met preparation, and luck happened." - Maurice Clarett

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