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Nareed
Nareed
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April 26th, 2012 at 5:44:30 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hay obvio que está lloviendo.



ES obvio....

Quote:

I have my doubts about the hay, a form of ser.



See what Paco wrote.

Quote:

Voy a arriesgar mi dinero en la lotería, porque predecí sólo 3,7 ganadores. = I'm going to risk my money on the lottery because I predict only 3.7 winners.



"...porque PREDIJE solo 3.7..."

I'll give you a pass on the conjugation, but please, please, please, do not adopt the very annoying habit of using a comma for a decimal point.
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Nareed
Nareed
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April 26th, 2012 at 5:55:59 PM permalink
BTW

Sorry for the delay. Estuve fuera de la ciudad todo el día.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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April 26th, 2012 at 8:39:44 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I'll give you a pass on the conjugation, but please, please, please, do not adopt the very annoying habit of using a comma for a decimal point.



Hmmm. I thought you were supposed to do that in certain countries. I'm pretty sure I saw that in Argentina lots of times. Germany too. However, I think Panama used the period.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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April 26th, 2012 at 8:57:04 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmmm. I thought you were supposed to do that in certain countries.



Yes, in certain countries. Including Spain. Not in Mexico, and not in the US. I learned in preschool that it's a decimal POINT, not a decimal comma.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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April 26th, 2012 at 9:17:23 PM permalink


I admit that I didn't write this. You can do it piecemeal over a few days. But it is about translating the humble word it into Spanish

  1. Where is the telephone? It is here.
  2. It is broken.
  3. Today I bought a laptop computer. It is very expensive. (hint: computadora portátil)
  4. I don't like this song. It's full of resentment. (hint: rencorosa)
  5. It is raining.
  6. It is snowing.
  7. It is dangerous.
  8. It is very common to find vendors on the beach. (hint: encontrar vendedores en la playa)
  9. It can happen. (hint: pasar)
  10. Did you see the car? I didn't see it.
  11. Did you see the shirt? I didn't see it. (hint: camisa)
  12. I don't like this hamburger, but I'm going to eat it.
  13. Antonio bought me a ring. Look at it! (hint: anillo)
  14. Do you have the key? I don't have it. (hint: llave)
  15. I saw something. Did you see it? (hint:algo)
  16. Give it a hit with your hand. (hint: golpe)
  17. The car is broken. I need an axle for it. (hint: "roto" "un eje")
  18. I like my bicycle a lot. I can't live without it.
  19. The test was very difficult. Because of it, I didn't pass. (hint:aprobé)
  20. There were many deaths before the civil war and during it. (hint: guerra civil )
  21. My girlfriend hates me. I don't want to talk about it.
  22. Don't worry about it.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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April 26th, 2012 at 9:22:50 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmmm. I thought you were supposed to do that in certain countries. I'm pretty sure I saw that in Argentina lots of times. Germany too. However, I think Panama used the period.


I think it is standard in continental Europe, so presumably in the southern cone and possibly Brazil.
If the number is short enough, like 3,142 you can fail to recognize the most common of numbers.
Nareed
Nareed
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April 27th, 2012 at 7:39:00 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I admit that I didn't write this. You can do it piecemeal over a few days. But it is about translating the humble word it into Spanish



You don't translate "it" into Spanish, becaue there is no equivalent pronoun. You either use "el" or "ella" (or variations thereof) when apropriate, or you imply the pronoun with the verb when that's called for.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
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April 27th, 2012 at 7:41:21 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I think it is standard in continental Europe, so presumably in the southern cone and possibly Brazil.
If the number is short enough, like 3,142 you can fail to recognize the most common of numbers.



And in some language the name sof days are capitalized, but in some countries with those languages they're not. In that case it makes no difference.

But calculators and computers use a decimal POINT, not a comma. So that's what the standard is, even if you can program excel to add 2,12 to 2.100.000.000.000.000.000,0000000000000000000000000000000009
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Wizard
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Wizard
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April 27th, 2012 at 9:09:13 AM permalink
I know that there is no direct translation of "it" into Spanish. You would probably use lo in lots of situations, and nothing in others, where it would be implied.

To be honest, I'm not big on going through long lists of things to translate, even if I can break it up. That just isn't the fun way to learn Spanish. I'm okay with translating just one sentence at a time.

Fecha: 27-4-12
Palabra: Empapar


Today's SWD means to soak. The reflexive empaparse means to get soaked. A related word is mojar, which also means to get wet. I think the difference is empapar means to get really wet.

Ejemplo time.

Empapé al chapoteo Montaña Chapoteo a Disneyland. = I got soaked on the Splash Mountain at Disneyland.

My biggest area of doubt above is how to translate "ride," as in at an amusement park.

In other news, we've discussed how to say guinea pig in Spanish after I got back from Argentina. My tutor says in Peru the word is cuy. Add that to your lists.

Also, Gavin MacLoud is still on the bulletin board. I'm getting more tempted with each week.

It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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April 27th, 2012 at 9:56:09 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to soak. The reflexive empaparse means to get soaked. A related word is mojar, which also means to get wet. I think the difference is empapar means to get really wet.



Well, consider the difference between saying "soaked" and "getting wet." It's the same thing.

Quote:

Empapé al chapoteo Montaña Chapoteo a Disneyland. = I got soaked on the Splash Mountain at Disneyland.



"ME empapé en Splash Mountain en DisneylandIA." Disney land does ahve a Spanish translation, of sorts. the rides themselves don't.

Quote:

My biggest area of doubt above is how to translate "ride," as in at an amusement park.



Usually they're referred to by name, but ommiting what theya re. So "the Space Mountain ride," is just "Space Mountain."

If you want to call them something in general, the word is "juegos." Example: "fuí a Disneylandia y me subí a los juegos." = "I went to Disneyland and got on the rides."
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