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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 28th, 2012 at 11:02:56 AM permalink


Como se dice, "Don't Feed the Trolls" en español?

Is it: No alimentar a los trolls ?

Does it mean the same thing in Mexico?
Nareed
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February 28th, 2012 at 11:52:04 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

No digas 7 cerca la mesa de craps, o maldeciré los dados.



"...or I will curse the dice."

That doesn't seem right.

"No digas 'siete' en la mesa de craps o maldecirás los dados."

But no one I know would say that. the right expression would go somethign like this: "No digas 'siete' en la mesa de craps porque le vas a echar la sal a los dados."

Now, that literally means "you're going to throw the salt on the dice," which is funnier than anything the Wizard has stumbled upon (just kidding). What it means is "you're going to jinx the dice."

You run into variants of "maldecir" most often in fiction, and mostly in translations. I keep sayig translators, or maybe editorial houses, like to clean up the language. But you see it in movies and TV shows, too. Suppose a character says "F**k!" it gets translated as "¡Maldición!" Which literally means "Damn it!" or "Damned!" Now, i don't care for vulgarity much in fiction (read Tom Clancy, he gets thick with that stuff), but sometimes it does work, if the audience is paying attention and yu sue it sparingly. I'd translate it as "¡Carajo!" (don't ask, I've no idea what it means) or "¡Chingados!"

In it's literal meaning, you see it in movies and books, too, as for example "La Maldición de la Momia" (No clue if a movie by that title exists, but it seems plausible).

I don't know how it differs from "Maleficio." I recall a long time ago there was en evening soap opera called "El Maleficio," but I don't watch that kind of, er, programming.
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Nareed
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February 28th, 2012 at 11:54:48 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Como se dice, "Don't Feed the Trolls" en español?

Is it: No alimentar a los trolls ?

Does it mean the same thing in Mexico?



No clue on both counts. Your translation is literally correct. I think "troll" the mythical creature can be translated as "Ogro," but that also means "Ogre."

It's been years since I've looked at a Spanish message board, and decades since I was active in one. When I was last active in one, the 9600 baud modem was a hot commodity, and you needed a university account to hook up to the internet.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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February 28th, 2012 at 12:44:56 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It's been years since I've looked at a Spanish message board, and decades since I was active in one. When I was last active in one, the 9600 baud modem was a hot commodity, and you needed a university account to hook up to the internet.



I've seen the following comments.

Quote: No olvides lo siguiente:


Cuando tratas de razonar con un troll, él gana;
cuando le gritas a un troll, él gana;
cuando insultas a un troll, él gana.
Lo único que un troll no soporta es que lo ignoren.
Ignorarlo constituye el mejor remedio para que se canse y se vaya.







I do want to highlight something I read, The verb soportar is a false friend, and does not mean support in the sense of to support somebody. The Spanish word for support in that sense is apoyar. Obviously it means can't stand in the guidance above.
Nareed
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February 29th, 2012 at 6:59:59 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I've seen the following comments.



The fad of using English words with no exact tranalstion comes and goes. I don't mind using them when it's appropriate, for instance with the word "craps." Then, too, Spanish purists abound.

Quote:

I do want to highlight something I read, The verb soportar is a false friend, and does not mean support in the sense of to support somebody. The Spanish word for support in that sense is apoyar. Obviously it means can't stand in the guidance above.



You'll never learn a language if you keep using your native tongue as a reference. There are all sorts of words which sound similar but have widely different meanings. It's better to look at the context to try to deduce meaning, or even to look the meaning up in a dictionary.

If it's any consolation, Spanish speaker's ahve a devil fo a time with English. Near the office there's a car wash named "Ram Car's Wash." I've seen and heard worse, too.
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pacomartin
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February 29th, 2012 at 10:21:48 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You'll never learn a language if you keep using your native tongue as a reference. There are all sorts of words which sound similar but have widely different meanings. It's better to look at the context to try to deduce meaning, or even to look the meaning up in a dictionary.

If it's any consolation, Spanish speaker's ahve a devil fo a time with English.



If you look at this sentence in Spanish and try to translate into English
Lo único que un troll no soporta es que lo ignoren.
it is pretty clear from the context that "no soporta" means "can not stand" .

But if you started with the concept in English, we would probably say "no tolera" since it is closer to the English verb.

--------------------------
I have a second question: If I put the following English sentence into Google Translate:
The only thing a troll can not stand is being ignored.

I get the first sentence below. What is the difference between the first and second sentence?

(1) Lo único que un troll no soporta es ignorado.
(2) Lo único que un troll no soporta es que lo ignoren.
Nareed
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February 29th, 2012 at 10:32:45 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

But if you started with the concept in English, we would probably say "no tolera" since it is closer to the English verb.



If I started with english, I'd translate as "lo único que el troll no aguanta..."

Quote:

I get the first sentence below. What is the difference between the first and second sentence?

(1) Lo único que un troll no soporta es ignorado.
(2) Lo único que un troll no soporta es que lo ignoren.



1) The only thing a troll can't stand is ignored.
2) The only thing a troll can't stand is to be ignored.

Sentence one doesn't make sense, or about par for the course for machine translation as yet.
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Wizard
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February 29th, 2012 at 6:17:59 PM permalink
Thanks for the help with maldicion. I was wondering if maldecir at its root means to say badly, i.e. "mal" and "decir." I find it interesting there is no direct word for "curse" in Spanish. There are a host of ways to curse yourself here. How would you translate the following in Spanish, "If you break a mirror you will be cursed for seven years." If breaking mirrors is not taboo in Mexico, what is?

I would have never thought that en would have been right for the preposition referring to the craps table. I would translated that back to English as "Don't say 'seven' on the craps table."
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Nareed
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February 29th, 2012 at 6:47:42 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for the help with maldicion.



My pleasure.

Quote:

I was wondering if maldecir at its root means to say badly, i.e. "mal" and "decir."



Possibly. Also possibly that goes back to the original Latin.

Quote:

I find it interesting there is no direct word for "curse" in Spanish. There are a host of ways to curse yourself here.



"Curse" as in saying "bad" words or using vulgarity, can be translated as "grosería" in Spanish. Otherwise, as in to palce a curse on someone, you're stuck with variants of "maldición."

Quote:

How would you translate the following in Spanish, "If you break a mirror you will be cursed for seven years." If breaking mirrors is not taboo in Mexico, what is?



I don't know if it's taboo or not. I try my best no to keep up with superstitions. But that one is well-known. you'd say "Si rompes el espejo tendrás siete años de mala suerte."

Quote:

I would have never thought that en would have been right for the preposition referring to the craps table. I would translated that back to English as "Don't say 'seven' on the craps table."



I've had trouble with english prepositions, too. But in this case "en" is right.
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pacomartin
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February 29th, 2012 at 7:30:29 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Possibly. Also possibly that goes back to the original Latin.



Latin spelling: maledico, from male (wickedly, badly) + dīcō (say, speak).

    Here are some of the most common verbs derived from decir along with examples of their usage:
  1. bendecir (to bless, to say grace at a meal): Que Dios los bendiga hoy y siempre. (May God bless them today and forever.)
  2. maldecir (to curse): Eliseo maldijo a los niños que se burlaban de él. (Elisha cursed the children who were mocking him.)
  3. contradecir (to contradict): La madre se contradijo en numerosas ocasiones durante el testimonio. (The mother contradicted herself on numerous occasions during her testimony.)
  4. desdecir (to deny): Yo no me desdigo de nada. (I don't deny anything.)
  5. predecir (to predict): Dos semanas antes de saber que estaba embarazada, Britney predijo su maternidad en una canción. (Two weeks before knowing she was pregnant, Britney predicted her motherhood in a song.)

  • condecir (This verb has some rare substandard usage as a substitute for conducir, "to conduct.")
  • interdecir (This verb is very seldom used, although a related noun form, interdicción, means "interdiction.")


    ===========
    Here is a rarely used English noun: imprecation: The act of invoking evil upon someone; a prayer that a curse or calamity may befall someone.
    From Latin imprecātio (calling down of curses), from imprecor (call down, invoke), from in- (towards) + precor (pray).

    Another English noun: deprecation is more or less a synonym.

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