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EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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August 3rd, 2019 at 11:02:52 AM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

okay, I'm going to try that - you should try "My Dark Places" - James Ellroy



Best place to get used books is Ebay.
Always look for free shipping. I never
pay more than $4 for a used book.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
Joined: May 8, 2015
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August 3rd, 2019 at 1:14:05 PM permalink
I'm very sorry that when I named my favorite books I inadvertently omitted "Invisible Man" by Ralph Ellison
he only really wrote one book - "Juneteenth" was unfinished and published by others after he died

"Invisible Man" IMHO is at least equal in greatness to any book by any American author if you exclude "Moby Dick"
it's not the size of the dog in the fight that matters........................it's the size of the fight in the dog
gordonm888
gordonm888
Joined: Feb 18, 2015
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August 3rd, 2019 at 1:48:15 PM permalink
I read Moby Dick (the unabridged version) in college and found it to be very tedious -all those chapters on whale blubber and the technical aspects of ships and whale hunting. I still have it on my shelves -maybe I should give it another try. Really, its been a long time since I heard anyone refer to it as the greatest American novel.
Sometimes, people are just a bottomless mystery. And, after all, this is just a sh*tty little forum in the sun-less backwaters of the online world.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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August 3rd, 2019 at 2:30:12 PM permalink
Quote: gordonm888

its been a long time since I heard anyone refer to it as the greatest American novel.



It was until about 100 years ago.
It no longer is since Hemingway
changed forever the way novels
are written . I'm not saying
he wrote the great American
novel, he radically changed the
writing style. Three years after
Sun was published it was being
taught in colleges across the
country.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Hunterhill
Hunterhill
Joined: Aug 1, 2011
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August 3rd, 2019 at 5:19:26 PM permalink
I read about 50 books a year,most are non fiction or historical fiction.Erik Larsen is great.Ny Times and Washington post are my favorite papers.
Just finished reading Principles by Ray Dalio,and No Surrender the true story of the Japanese soldier who was hiding in the jungles of the Philippines and thought ww2 was still going on,he finally surrendered in 1974.
Don't teach an alligator how to swim.
Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
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August 3rd, 2019 at 5:29:42 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob


I discovered Bill Bryson a few months ago and
ordered 10 of his books. Mostly he travels
and writes about it, very funny stuff. I'm
reading two of his books right now.



I’ve read a few of his. I particularly enjoyed At Home: A History of Private Life.

I used to read the same way you do: 3-4-5 books going at once. But I had cataract surgery about 8 years ago, and I changed from being nearsighted to being far sighted. I used to bring books right up tp my face to read them, sometimes with one eye closed; now I have to hold them at arm’s length, and I need bright light. Sometimes I can read a book through, and sometimes I lose patience and go look up what happened. That’s what happened with Killers of the Flower Moon, two and a half chapters in and I googled “Osage Indian killings”. But then I blew through American Predator, that was a good one.

Bob, if you haven’t read Chickenhawk yet, do it. That is the book I recommend most. I rarely read a book more than once, but I’ve read that one probably a dozen times. Second is Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors. Another great one. (But I only read it once.)
NO KILL I
Mosca
Mosca
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beachbumbabs
August 3rd, 2019 at 5:47:08 PM permalink
Quote: Rigondeaux


I'm very slowly making my way through Moby Dick again. Best novel I've ever read by a wide margin.



Fun story: when my daughter was between her junior and senior years of high school, summer 2008, she was assigned Moby Dick for summer reading, for advanced Am Lit class. She was complaining about it, so we made a deal: I would read it with her, and we’d talk about what we read. So we made it through the summer, reading some each day (it can drag in the middle).

On the first day of class, the teacher gave a test on Moby Dick. Not the kind of thing that you could get from reading the Cliff’s Notes, but stuff like “Name five of the ships that the Pequod encountered.” Stuff that you would have had to actually read the book to know. She was the only one in the class who passed.
NO KILL I
EvenBob
EvenBob
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Mosca
August 3rd, 2019 at 9:11:13 PM permalink
Quote: Mosca

I’ve read a few of his. I particularly enjoyed At Home: A History of Private Life.



Haven't got there yet. I'm reading
Summer of 1927 next.

Quote:

and I changed from being nearsighted to being far sighted.


I read with an old 5" magnifying glass
now, like my great grandad used to
do. I don't need it, but it makes it
easier and no eye strain. I come from
a family of readers. When we visited
the old folks, my dad, grandfather, and
great grandfather would all be sitting
in the parlor by the tall bay windows,
in rocking chairs, reading paperbacks
with magnifying glasses. It was straight
out of Norman Rockwell.

My dad read mostly sci/fi, but both
grandparents read nothing but pulp
paperback westerns. They were both
born in the late 1800's and the Wild
West was a huge deal. This was the
50's and early 60's, they watched
western after western on the B/W TV.
10 years before that, 1945, they didn't
even have electric yet. It must have
seemed like the 21st century to go
from kerosene lamps to television
in just 10 years.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Mosca
Mosca
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Thanks for this post from:
Rigondeaux
August 4th, 2019 at 6:19:13 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

I come from
a family of readers. When we visited
the old folks, my dad, grandfather, and
great grandfather would all be sitting
in the parlor by the tall bay windows,
in rocking chairs, reading paperbacks
with magnifying glasses. It was straight
out of Norman Rockwell.



My family has always been readers, too. My dad had a stroke in May (91 years old). He had to leave assisted living and move to a personal care home, and I’ve been cleaning his room. He had close to 100 books, maybe more, piled up in his closet.

Now he is in a personal care home, doing much better but with huge gaps in memory, reasoning, and ability, including the ability to read. But he requested two books: C.J. Box’ The Disappeared and Wolf Pack. He tries to read them, but hasn’t made it past the first page. But he still sits there with one or the other of them open, trying.

I used to read more fiction, but I feel the quality of writing has declined over the years; or maybe it has passed me by, I don’t know. Too many times I’m aware of the artifice. The only guy I’ve read in the last few years that I’ve liked has been Cormac McCarthy. Elmore Leonard was great, but of course he’s been gone for a while now.

Styles change. We can still read fiction written 150 years ago, but it requires some patience, in the same way films from the ‘30s and ‘40s do for younger people today, because people structured their sentences differently, cared about different things, etc. Language changes. When those changes accumulate to a certain point, they interfere with meaning, and thus Moby Dick changes from “fascinating” to “difficult”. But imagine the reader in the late 19th century, who knew there was a whaling industry but knew nothing about it. The minutiae must have been fascinating in that analog culture where people depended on specific tools for everything,
NO KILL I
Rigondeaux
Rigondeaux
Joined: Aug 18, 2014
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August 4th, 2019 at 6:26:38 AM permalink
Quote: Mosca

Fun story: when my daughter was between her junior and senior years of high school, summer 2008, she was assigned Moby Dick for summer reading, for advanced Am Lit class. She was complaining about it, so we made a deal: I would read it with her, and we’d talk about what we read. So we made it through the summer, reading some each day (it can drag in the middle).

On the first day of class, the teacher gave a test on Moby Dick. Not the kind of thing that you could get from reading the Cliff’s Notes, but stuff like “Name five of the ships that the Pequod encountered.” Stuff that you would have had to actually read the book to know. She was the only one in the class who passed.



It might not be suitable for high school. At least not reading the whole thing. I would probably focus on portions of the book and trying to explain why they are good.

If they are bright, which I'm sure your daughter was, they might get the language and begin to perceive the poetry. The guy who wrote the intro to mine argued that it's actually an epic poem.

Some people might never be into all the history of whaling stuff. Since I have a personal preference for nautical stuff, I eat it up with a spoon. The amount of knowledge/research, even if much is fictionalized, is impressive by itself. I think that sort of thing is especially hard for high schoolers because it's still a bit hard form them to grasp that people in olden times were just as real as they are, and that this was what life really was like. It's hard to actually visualize themselves living a life so far removed from what they know.

The philosophical stuff, which is packed in there, is going to be very hard for a young person to get. For example: "There is a wisdom that is woe; but there is a woe that is madness."

I can barely accept the fact that the book was written by a single man. And that's just based on the parts of the book I grasp. Certainly, much of the genius still sails over my head, and then I miss more stuff because I live in a different time.

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