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TumblingBones
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September 11th, 2019 at 8:26:48 AM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

My first Heinlein was Citizen of the Galaxy. I think i was 10 or so. It made a HUGE impression on me, and remains in my top 5 Heinleins.

It warms my heart to see you mention him repeatedly.

You younger guys who don't read much, you would like his books a lot.


This has always been one my favorites (#3 after Stranger in a Strange Land and Moon is a Harsh Mistress). After your post I decided to re-read it (probably been about 40 years since the last time) but I was really bummed to find that some how I had managed to loose my copy. Everything else by Heinlein I still have but this one book has vanished. What's worse is that it's out of print and Amazon lists new copies going for $37 to $70 so I don't think I'll be replacing it. At least our local library has a copy.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
TigerWu
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September 11th, 2019 at 9:16:29 AM permalink
Can anybody recommend any other books in the same vein as Whale Hunt in the Desert?
EvenBob
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September 11th, 2019 at 10:25:14 AM permalink
Quote: TumblingBones

This has always been one my favorites (#3 after Stranger in a Strange Land and Moon is a Harsh Mistress). After your post I decided to re-read it (probably been about 40 years since the last time) but I was really bummed to find that some how I had managed to loose my copy. Everything else by Heinlein I still have but this one book has vanished. What's worse is that it's out of print and Amazon lists new copies going for $37 to $70 so I don't think I'll be replacing it. At least our local library has a copy.



You can get a used copy on Ebay
for under $5 and free shipping.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
EvenBob
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September 14th, 2019 at 11:08:30 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Bought my first Heinlein book
since the 80's. Read it when I
was 14 and it had a big effect
on me. I want to find out why.



I'm seeing why this book had a
big effect on my 14 year old mind.
It's chauvinistic Heinlein showing
me what my attitude should be
towards women. That I'm always
in charge, that I never let them
tell me what to do. And they'll
be forever grateful when I assert
myself and do this. Pretty much
the opposite of what real life
is like.

It's a fun read, lots of nudity and
implied sex and beautiful women
kowtowing to a man.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
TumblingBones
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September 17th, 2019 at 3:27:39 PM permalink
Just received a copy of "Permanent Record", Snowdens' new autobiography. Probably be a couple weeks before I can get around to reading it. I suspect there won't be much nudity, implied sex, or women kowtowing to a man so EvenBob probably won't be getting a copy.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
lilredrooster
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September 21st, 2019 at 4:08:28 AM permalink
the link shows online sites where you can read many books for free because of changing copyright laws


https://www.theverge.com/2019/9/17/20868883/free-online-fiction-library-how-to-find-new-books-copyright-novels-short-stories
the foolish sayings of a rich man often pass for words of wisdom by the fools around him
EvenBob
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October 9th, 2019 at 12:01:19 AM permalink
Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brien. This series
of books what's recommended here and I bought a
bunch of them. I finally finished the first one in the series.
It's a good thing there are reviews that I can look at,
because I would never read another one of these books
after reading the first one. One of the most hodgepodge,
poorly written books I've ever read.

But people in the
reviews say, stick it out to the third novel. Apparently
nobody likes the first one. 400 pages and almost zero
character development. I don't know what people look
like, their ages, what their backgrounds are. It's like
the characters are paper mache puppets going through
the motions. The author jumps around scene to scene
with no segways.

The main character, Jack Aubrey, is
apparently a big man. The doctor tells him he's fat,
weighs at least 240 lb, his buttocks jiggle when he walks.
That's more of a description then we get of any other
character in the book. His crew are just names, they
rarely speak, we get zero background information on
them. The only good thing in the book is the author's
description of the ship and the battles they fight. I'm
going to continue on to the second and third books
and see if the author learns how to write a novel.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
jmills
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October 10th, 2019 at 6:53:47 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brien. This series
of books what's recommended here and I bought a
bunch of them. I finally finished the first one in the series.
It's a good thing there are reviews that I can look at,
because I would never read another one of these books
after reading the first one. One of the most hodgepodge,
poorly written books I've ever read.

But people in the
reviews say, stick it out to the third novel. Apparently
nobody likes the first one. 400 pages and almost zero
character development. I don't know what people look
like, their ages, what their backgrounds are. It's like
the characters are paper mache puppets going through
the motions. The author jumps around scene to scene
with no segways.

The main character, Jack Aubrey, is
apparently a big man. The doctor tells him he's fat,
weighs at least 240 lb, his buttocks jiggle when he walks.
That's more of a description then we get of any other
character in the book. His crew are just names, they
rarely speak, we get zero background information on
them. The only good thing in the book is the author's
description of the ship and the battles they fight. I'm
going to continue on to the second and third books
and see if the author learns how to write a novel.



I'm not sure if these books will improve for you or not. I fully agree the author is all over the place with the plot, sometimes skipping a few weeks within a paragraph with no explanation. There's a run of four or five books later on that are really all one story. It seems like he would hit ten chapters and call it good, and the the next book starts right where the previous one left off.

I like the bare bone approach to character and environment descriptions, but I think if you stick with them you'll see that Aubrey and Maturin are two of the best characters in historical fiction. Maturin especially becomes more fascinating and flawed in the second and third books. I would recommend you try to make it at least to the fifth book, Desolation Island, my favorite, but I'll warn you the fourth book, The Mauritius Campaign, to me was a drag. It's the only book that tries to put the main characters into a real historical campaign and comes off stiffly for it.

Maturin is also one of Stephen King's favorite characters. He named the Turtle after him in the Dark Tower books.
gordonm888
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October 10th, 2019 at 7:16:23 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Quote: EvenBob

Bought my first Heinlein book
since the 80's. Read it when I
was 14 and it had a big effect
on me. I want to find out why.



I'm seeing why this book had a
big effect on my 14 year old mind.
It's chauvinistic Heinlein showing
me what my attitude should be
towards women. That I'm always
in charge, that I never let them
tell me what to do. And they'll
be forever grateful when I assert
myself and do this. Pretty much
the opposite of what real life
is like.

It's a fun read, lots of nudity and
implied sex and beautiful women
kowtowing to a man.



I am a huge Heinlein fan, but Glory Road is one of my least favorite Heinlein books. This was Heinlein's first and last attempt at writing fantasy (and I also love fantasy books -so its surprising how disappointed I was with this one.) Heinlein also felt it was not very good, and decided to give up on attempting to write fantasy. So, its interesting to see how much this book is special to you.
So many better men, a few of them friends, are dead. And a thousand thousand slimy things live on, and so do I.
Wizard
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October 10th, 2019 at 7:48:07 PM permalink
I'm reading The Wanderers by Chuck Wendig



I'm only about 50 pages in, but it has been compared to The Stand. The plot line involves a certain percentage of the population starting to wander like zombies and all efforts to wake them up fail. A computer is also involved that is trying to get at the cause. That is about as far as I've taken it so far. A good page turner and I'm not a big book reader.
"For with much wisdom comes much sorrow." -- Ecclesiastes 1:18 (NIV)
EvenBob
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October 10th, 2019 at 8:14:42 PM permalink
Quote: gordonm888

So, its interesting to see how much this book is special to you.



It's the time period I read it
is, I was 14 in a sexually
repressive era. The woman
in the book is beguiling.
She's beautiful and wise
and intelligent, and the man
tames her. I thought that's
how all relationships should
be. I was kinda wrong on most
of it.

The book is OK, though kind
of shallow. The last 75 pages
are unreadable, it's Heinlein
describing this fantasy society.
Why bother, it doesn't exist and
never will, what's the point.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
EvenBob
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October 10th, 2019 at 8:19:59 PM permalink
Quote: jmills

I'm not sure if these books will improve for you or not. I fully agree the author is all over the place with the plot,



The first chapter of book 2 is already
better than the whole first book.
The author actually describes the
main characters and gives background
on Aubry. The first book needed
a glossary for all the arcane naval
terms used from 200 years ago.
It was like reading a foreign language.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
lilredrooster
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October 16th, 2019 at 4:24:21 PM permalink
we posted about some mystery writers but nobody mentioned James M. Cain - and wow was he great
he has to be considered as one of the best or maybe the best of the mystery scribes - in the same league as Chandler


"The Postman Always Rings Twice" and "Double Indemnity" - great, great stuff
the foolish sayings of a rich man often pass for words of wisdom by the fools around him
Face
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October 16th, 2019 at 4:53:03 PM permalink
Quote: jmills

He named the Turtle...



Sköldpadda*. On its shell it holds the Earth.
The opinions of this moderator are for entertainment purposes only.
EvenBob
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October 16th, 2019 at 8:40:39 PM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

we posted about some mystery writers but nobody mentioned James M. Cain - and wow was he great
he has to be considered as one of the best or maybe the best of the mystery scribes - in the same league as Chandler


"The Postman Always Rings Twice" and "Double Indemnity" - great, great stuff



I just ordered 4 novels in one book
from Amazon. Postman, Double,
Serenade, Mildred Pierce. Big
Raymond Chandler and Dashiell
Hammett fan.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
billryan
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October 16th, 2019 at 9:48:24 PM permalink
Decoded to reread Travels with Charley. I read it the summer before I started high school and I'm sure it contributed to my never ending wanderlust.
The difference between fiction and reality is that fiction is supposed to make sense.
EvenBob
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October 17th, 2019 at 1:53:14 AM permalink
Quote: billryan

Decoded to reread Travels with Charley. I read it the summer before I started high school and I'm sure it contributed to my never ending wanderlust.



Be aware that Steinbeck faked 90%
of it. Came out decades after he
died that early on the trip he found
he wasn't getting much to write
about and it sucked sleeping in
the camper.

So he traveled to a new town and
checked into the best hotel and
wrote the book as a novel. His wife
would fly in on weekends and they
would eat in the best restaurants
and see a show if they were near a
big city.

The book is a sham, it's mostly fiction.
Lots of articles about it out there.

https://www.post-gazette.com/ae/book-reviews/2012/10/14/Travels-With-Charley-now-officially-mostly-fiction/stories/201210140200
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
lilredrooster
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October 17th, 2019 at 3:06:36 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

I just ordered 4 novels in one book
from Amazon. Postman, Double,
Serenade, Mildred Pierce.




there is a book of 17 short stories by Cain that I didn't know about until now - thinking about him made me search
I'm going to order it


https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Crime-Stories-James-Cain-ebook/dp/B00VSLI6LA/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=complete+crimes+stories+james+cain&qid=1571306607&s=books&sr=1-1
the foolish sayings of a rich man often pass for words of wisdom by the fools around him
gordonm888
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October 17th, 2019 at 5:17:17 AM permalink
I am reading the Autobiography of Mark Twain, Vol. 1. Meh. It is mostly a lot of reminiscing about childhood and a journal about what he was doing and thinking during the years he wrote this book. Not a coherent account of his life. Disappointing.
So many better men, a few of them friends, are dead. And a thousand thousand slimy things live on, and so do I.
EvenBob
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October 17th, 2019 at 8:39:27 PM permalink
Quote: billryan

Decoded to reread Travels with Charley. I read it the summer before I started high school and I'm sure it contributed to my never ending wanderlust.



Superior to Charley is Blue Highways, from
1983. Great book, you can get it on Ebay
for $3.50, free shipping.

"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
EvenBob
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November 27th, 2019 at 12:30:09 PM permalink
Quote: jmills

I like the bare bone approach to character and environment descriptions, but I think if you stick with them you'll see that Aubrey and Maturin are two of the best characters in historical fiction. Maturin especially becomes more fascinating and flawed in the second and third books.



I'm on the 3rd book, the 2nd was
far better than the 1st, which was
awful. I'm amazed at how modern
the Navy and bookkeeping and
banking were 220 years ago. And
they're Brits, so they're super
polite to each other to the point
of ridiculousness.

It is maddening how the author
goes from a raging battle, to
the next paragraph where the
battle is long over and they're
ashore. Never seen a writer do
that before. It's lazy writing.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
EvenBob
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December 25th, 2019 at 10:39:26 PM permalink
Just finished The Dain Curse by Dashiell Hammett.
Now I get to watch the TV mini-series by the same
name that was made in the 1970s starring James
Coburn. It's so much fun to be able to finish a book
and watch the movie right away. One of the best examples
is The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler.
The movie follows the book almost exactly. It's like the
book was the screenplay for the movie.

Dashiell hammett's stuff is so good it's like
it was written yesterday. And it was written almost a
hundred years ago. He lived into the 1960s but quit
writing in 1934. Nobody knows why, he just quit.
And nobody asked him because apparently he was
a real prick and if you knew him you didn't ask him
anything. But his books and short stories are fantastic.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
EvenBob
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December 28th, 2019 at 3:26:46 PM permalink
Very interesting to see where some
of your favorite writers wrote.

https://writingcooperative.com/100-famous-authors-and-their-writing-spaces-8ee25c50c927

This is exactly where I pictured Tolkein
working.

"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
Wizard
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December 28th, 2019 at 4:07:12 PM permalink
I'm readying Mobituaries and enjoying it. The idea is to give proper credit to forgotten people and movements in history. It's done with a great balance of information and humor. Anyone familiar with Mo Rocca will understand his style.

Any Vegas members want to have it after I'm done?
"For with much wisdom comes much sorrow." -- Ecclesiastes 1:18 (NIV)
Minty
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December 28th, 2019 at 6:46:02 PM permalink
Currently reading a book entitled "The Introvert Advantage: How to Thrive in an Extrovert World." Though it seems more geared towards those who need a confidence boost, it's kind of fun to read about successful introverts and the misconceptions people have about introversion.
"Just because I'm not doing anything illegal, doesn't mean I won't have to defend myself someday." -Chip Reese
EvenBob
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December 28th, 2019 at 11:42:57 PM permalink
Holy smoke, look at this authors
personal library. I'm very jealous.
And we're only seeing part of
it here. She can't have read them
all.

Added later. She's Nigella Lawson,
famous Brit cookbook author. She
comes from a wealthy family, I'm
betting that's her fathers library
and not her's.

"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
Rigondeaux
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December 29th, 2019 at 8:07:32 PM permalink
I've found Albert Ellis's popular works to be incredibly good. While I don't agree with every word, his tools for dealing with neurosis are gold.

So, I got a collection of his more professional/academic works. As is often the case with really brilliant people, he is very clear in his academic writings.

The best essay is about the link between neurotic and anti scientific or dogmatic thinking.

According to Ellis anxiety, depression etc occur due partly to rigid absolutist thinking. For example, I must get this job or it will be confirmed that I'm a loser.

Healthier thinking is more flexible and can deal with different facts, like science can.

Religious and political dogmatists mirror the thinking of the neurotic. X MUST be the case. This is why they often reject scientific findings and other facts that conflict with their narrative.
EvenBob
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beachbumbabsgordonm888
January 14th, 2020 at 1:48:09 AM permalink
I really like the Jack Reacher movies and I'm
finally getting around to reading some of the
books. I ordered the first book in the series
from eBay, it came today. I sat down and
thought, well, let's see how badly this sucks.

140 Pages later I said, holy crap, this guy can
write. I immediately went on eBay and bought
10 more books. His writing style reminds me a
lot of Stephen King. Lee Child's writing is
descriptive, yet right to the point. He knows
how to advance the story, he doesn't get
lost in Flowery rhetoric. This book is literally a
page Turner, you want to know what's going
to happen next.

I love discovering something like
this years after it's been on the market because
it's like discovering buried treasure. I have 25 books
to read. If I had discovered this in 1997, I would
have had to wait every year for another book..

Last edited by: EvenBob on Jan 14, 2020
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
beachbumbabs
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January 14th, 2020 at 6:34:35 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

I really like the Jack Reacher movies and I'm
finally getting around reading some of the
books. I ordered the first book in the series
from eBay, it came today. I sat down and
thought, well, let's see how badly this sucks.

140 Pages later I said, holy crap, this guy can
write. I immediately whet on eBay and bought
10 more books. His writing style reminds me a
lot of Stephen King. Lee Child's writing is
descriptive, yet right to the point. He knows
how to advance the story, he doesn't get
lost in Flowery rhetoric. This book is literally a
page Turner, you want to know what's going
to happen next.

I love discovering something like
this years after it's been on the market because
it's like discovering buried treasure. I have 25 books
to read. If I had discovered this in 1997, I would
have had to wait every year for another book..



I found him in 1997. Waited impatiently for (and bought) every book since. Only a couple are meh. The rest are stunningly good. Can't put them down. You'll be up all night several times.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
EvenBob
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January 14th, 2020 at 10:07:38 AM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

[

I found him in 1997. Waited impatiently for (and bought) every book since. Only a couple are meh. The rest are stunningly good. Can't put them down. You'll be up all night several times.



I did it with John McDonald. I didn't discover
Travis McGee until 12 books had been written.
I didn't find Patrick O'Brian and the
Aubrey–Maturin series until all the books had
been written. I found Stephen King in the
mid 90's. Perfect..
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
TigerWu
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January 14th, 2020 at 10:17:39 AM permalink
That was me with Michael Crichton. Didn't really get into him till the mid-2000's, then read just about everything he wrote, except for the heavy medical stuff and I think Disclosure. (Also haven't read whatever they published after his death.)
gordonm888
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January 14th, 2020 at 10:33:55 AM permalink
Strongly agree about Lee Child and his Jack Reacher books. I have read every one -like BBB, most I have waited for year by year (and I'm cheap -I wait until they are in paperback.) They are compulsively readable.

Although at some point I felt like tallying up how many people Reacher has killed (maybe another tally for people hospitalized) over the entire series of books. He has hurt more people than DarkOz.
So many better men, a few of them friends, are dead. And a thousand thousand slimy things live on, and so do I.
EvenBob
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January 14th, 2020 at 11:01:29 AM permalink
Quote: gordonm888



Although at some point I felt like tallying up how many people Reacher has killed



Reading the first one, Killing Floor. 100
pages in he kills some prison convict
by kicking him in the throat. He justifies
it by saying, hey, he started it.

Some books are written in 1st person,
some in 3rd. Child says he changes
the narrative to fit the stories.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
EvenBob
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January 18th, 2020 at 10:02:01 PM permalink
Lee Child announced today he is turning over
the writing of the Jack Reacher books to his
younger brother. They will work together on
the next four Reacher books, and then Lee
Child is out for good. He's 65 and feels like
he's run out of original ideas.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
lilredrooster
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January 25th, 2020 at 5:23:59 AM permalink
it's interesting (to me) to compare the truly great writers to the renowned current popular authors

for example in mysteries - and I like some of the current mystery writers - I'm not knocking them

but if you try to compare them to the greatest mystery book of all time IMHO - Dostoievsky's "Crime and Punishment"

wow - there really is no comparison - nobody current can touch that guy - their books aren't anywhere near to his in greatness IMO
the foolish sayings of a rich man often pass for words of wisdom by the fools around him
EvenBob
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January 25th, 2020 at 11:33:54 PM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

but if you try to compare them to the greatest mystery book of all time IMHO - Dostoievsky's "Crime and Punishment"
wow - there really is no comparison - nobody current can touch that guy - their books aren't anywhere near to his in greatness IMO



Apples and oranges. The writing
style of the mid 19th century
completely changed in the 20th
century. What was flowery and
complicated became direct
and to the point. Thanks mostly
to Hemingway and Dashiell
Hammet. 19th century authors
had a very small audience they
were pandering to, the educated
upper class. That had all changed
by the early 20th, people of all
classes were reading and they
wanted brevity and interesting
plots and lots of action.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
lilredrooster
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January 26th, 2020 at 4:19:40 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Apples and oranges.




yes, I agree - you're explanation is a good one

but I also want to give credit where credit is due

nobody from any era ever wrote anything like that - not that I'm aware of

Dostoievsky was tortured and imprisoned by the czarist regime and he was a compulsive losing gambler - he knew desperation well

that is part of the reason why he was able to so brilliantly depict the inner workings of the mind of a desperate psychopath
Last edited by: lilredrooster on Jan 26, 2020
the foolish sayings of a rich man often pass for words of wisdom by the fools around him
EvenBob
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January 26th, 2020 at 3:29:26 PM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

yes, I agree - you're explanation is a good one



Mark Twain gets a lot of
credit too. He was a huge
influence on Hemingway
and other early 20th
century writers.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
EvenBob
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March 15th, 2020 at 1:32:04 AM permalink
Oh my God. I'm on book 16 in the Jack Reacher series,
Never Go Back. It's the book they made the second
Reacher movie from. The book is so different from
the movie it's almost hard to believe. They changed
the storyline entirely. Almost nothing in the book is in
the movie. This is where Reacher is told he got someone
pregnant 16 years ago and he has a daughter that he's
supposed to be supporting. In the movie the daughter
is a main character, she's in almost every scene. In the
book she doesn't show up till page 300 and we only see
her three brief times and then she disappears. The book
it's so much better than the movie it's hard to believe.
Don't get me wrong, I've seen the Reacher movie five
times, it was pretty good, but it's nothing like the book.
The bad guys aren't even the same, almost nothing is
this the same.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
TumblingBones
TumblingBones
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March 15th, 2020 at 3:40:09 PM permalink
Maybe we should start a new thread for "Worst Movie Adaptation of a Great Book". I nominate "Last of the Mohicans". I can not overstate how much I hate that movie for ruining a great work of literature. The book is perfect. Two sisters (Alice and Cora) and their romantic interests (for Alice the British Maj Hayward and for Cora the last Mohican Uncas) represent the Old World and the New World respectively. Different attitudes, different approaches to handling their problems. The two grownups, Hawkeye and Chingachgook, are there for the adventure parts of the plot but are basically just moving the story along. The point of the whole book is the two couples.

So Hollywood in all it's greedy and egotistical arrogance mucks the whole thing up. There can only be one star in a movie and that's Daniel Day Lewis who is playing the heroic Hawkeye. Plus you can't have Cora fall in love with a tragic figure like Uncas (who isn't even a White man!!) and be willing to die for him. The audiences may not approve and that would reduce the revenues. Instead she has to fall in love with Hawkeye and live happily ever after. What crap.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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July 9th, 2020 at 11:59:30 AM permalink
My dad, his dad, his dads dad,
were all fans of Perry Mason.
Never read one of them. Ordered
what's supposedly the best one
and got a pristine like new book
from 1965. It's so mint I don't
want to open it.

"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
TumblingBones
TumblingBones
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July 9th, 2020 at 1:24:57 PM permalink
I hear that HBO has a new series that's supposed to be about the early days of Perry Mason (i.e., he's not yet a lawyer). Reviews are mixed at best (7/10 on IMDB).
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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July 10th, 2020 at 11:55:23 PM permalink
I finished the 5th Bosch book. I recently read
all 24 of the Reacher series. Connelly is such
a better writer than Child, I don't know if
I could read another Reacher book. Connelly
has great character development, Child has
almost none.

Jack Reacher is almost a comic book character
in many ways. It's like a graphic novel. Child
has a template he uses for Reacher, he's
expected to do certain things in every
book. Mainly kill people or beat them up.
Lots of action, just like a graphic novel.

The Bosch books are long and involved,
lots of twists and they make you think
about the plot. I finished Last Coyote
and thought, how can they get any better
than this. Ironically, I learned that Coyote
is Connelly's fave in the series. So maybe
they don't get better. Trunk Music was
pretty good, it's what season 2 of the TV
series was about.

"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
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July 16th, 2020 at 3:37:51 AM permalink
I'm kind of embarrassed that I don't really know this author - I don't read anywhere near as much as I used to -
but anyway, David Foster Wallace is a modern author who is highly regarded - his major work being "Infinite Jest"
I haven't read it but I took aim at this free collection of essays and stories
the first one was really great - it was about the reaction of a small midwestern city to the 9/11 attacks - I'm planning to read several of the others
sadly, Wallace suffered from major depression and committed suicide when he was in his 40s


http://www.openculture.com/2012/02/23_free_essays_stories_by_david_foster_wallace_available_on_the_web.html
Last edited by: lilredrooster on Jul 16, 2020
the foolish sayings of a rich man often pass for words of wisdom by the fools around him
DRich
DRich
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July 16th, 2020 at 6:11:23 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

I finished the 5th Bosch book. I recently read
all 24 of the Reacher series. Connelly is such
a better writer than Child, I don't know if
I could read another Reacher book. Connelly
has great character development, Child has
almost none.



I have not read the Bosch books and wasn't even aware of them until last week. I just finished watching the Bosch tv series on Amazon, I thought it was above average. It was interesting enough that I will probably read the books on my next vacation.
At my age, a "Life In Prison" sentence is not much of a deterrent.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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July 16th, 2020 at 9:57:26 AM permalink
Quote: DRich

I have not read the Bosch books and wasn't even aware of them until last week. I just finished watching the Bosch tv series on Amazon, I thought it was above average. It was interesting enough that I will probably read the books on my next vacation.



The books are far superior to the
TV series. There are way too many
filler side stories in the series that
are not in the books.
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
billryan
billryan
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July 16th, 2020 at 12:02:58 PM permalink
In the early 1980s, a friend introduced me to the Mack Bolan series of books. I read quite a few and was a fan. After a year or two, I'd read almost all of them and moved on to other things. A year or two ago, I was at a swap meet in Lake Havasu and a guy had early editions of the first couple of dozen of them. Some were first prints, but most were 2nd or 3rd. I paid the princely sum of fifty cents each for them, knowing I could move them on eBay for a nice profit.
I started to read a random one and didn't get twenty pages in. Grabbed another and it read much the same. I was amazed at how my taste had changed in forty years.
Mack Bolan was the inspiration for Marvels Punisher character. After failing to get the rights to Bolan, Marvel had a writer read a dozen books and come up with a character that would be close enough but not close enough to get sued over. Marvel slow-played the character, using him once a year for a decade before making him into a mainstay.
The difference between fiction and reality is that fiction is supposed to make sense.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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July 16th, 2020 at 12:26:22 PM permalink
Quote: billryan


I started to read a random one and didn't get twenty pages in. Grabbed another and it read much the same. I was amazed at how my taste had changed in forty years.



Same with Travis McGee. I read all
those as they came out in the 70's
and 80's. Now I can't get through
a chapter. It makes you realize why
the classics are classics. I recently
read all of Dashiell Hammett's
stuff again, it never gets old.
Chandler either. Most of Hammett's
stuff was written almost 100 years
ago. He never wrote anything after
1933, he got permanent writers
block for 30 years.

I got my first Perry Mason book and
am afraid to read it. Gardner was looked
upon as a real hack in his time, though
he was the best selling author. Over
100 Perry Mason books, how original
can they be. Stephen King was also
considered a hack in the 70's and
80's, but his stuff is really good. He
had such a bad rep for writing too
many books in too short a time, I
put off reading him till the 90's.
Last edited by: EvenBob on Jul 16, 2020
"It's not called gambling if the math is on your side."
unJon
unJon
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July 16th, 2020 at 5:57:17 PM permalink
I love Stephen King books, but for my money he hardly ever sticks the ending.
The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong; but that is the way to bet.
DRich
DRich
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July 16th, 2020 at 6:01:00 PM permalink
Quote: unJon

I love Stephen King books, but for my money he hardly ever sticks the ending.



Amazingly, I have never read any Stephen King.
At my age, a "Life In Prison" sentence is not much of a deterrent.
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