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Mosca
Mosca
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August 9th, 2019 at 1:41:04 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

And there you have it. The reason
students prefer screens is, they're
forced to pay less attention and
comprehend less. It's just a form
of mental masturbation, you
aren't really accomplishing anything.

I've tried ebooks many times and
they just don't hold my attention.



I think they like not having to interact with a physical object.

I canít recall where I read it, but research has been done that shows that ebooks face competition from the internet; a reader will read for a bit, then open a browser and visit forums etc. Iíve found that to be true for myself. Attention span is shorter on a tablet.
NO KILL I
EvenBob
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August 9th, 2019 at 1:56:14 PM permalink
Quote: Mosca

a reader will read for a bit, then open a browser and visit forums etc. Iíve found that to be true for myself. Attention span is shorter on a tablet.



The average time 'just checking' is
around 20 min, before you get
back to what you were doing.
It does not suck to be me.
AZDuffman
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August 9th, 2019 at 3:07:24 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

And there you have it. The reason
students prefer screens is, they're
forced to pay less attention and
comprehend less. It's just a form
of mental masturbation, you
aren't really accomplishing anything.

I've tried ebooks many times and
they just don't hold my attention.



I offered to loan a guy a book I forget which. Guy said he canít read non kindle anymore. Iíve never owned a kindle.

I used to read everything now I read more in snippets. Articles or things vs full books. Iíve read so many business books Iím kind of done. I now read more how to articles. Unless it is gambling or mafia related. I eat those up.
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
lilredrooster
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August 10th, 2019 at 6:45:21 AM permalink
"The Trial" - Franz Kafka - people hear the name Kafka and they think it's heavy deep stuff - but this book is an easy read

set a long time ago in Russia - and innocent man faces a bureaucratic nightmare

he's charged with a crime and he can't even find out what crime it is he's charged with

he can't find out anything about the status of his case or even when the trial will be

it's chilling
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Rigondeaux
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August 10th, 2019 at 9:45:10 AM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster



he's charged with a crime and he can't even find out what crime it is he's charged with

he can't find out anything about the status of his case or even when the trial will be



The most amazing part is that he was able to capture this experience so well without ever having married.
lilredrooster
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Rigondeaux
August 10th, 2019 at 11:02:22 AM permalink
Quote: Rigondeaux

The most amazing part is that he was able to capture this experience so well without ever having married.




that was funny..............................you might want to think about doing stand up comedy................................. 😃 😃 😃
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TumblingBones
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August 10th, 2019 at 11:06:40 AM permalink
If you are a fan of Aubrey-Maturin books by Patrick O'Brian, you should take a look at "A Book of Voyages" edited by the same author. This is a non-fiction collection of 17th and 18th century travel journals and memoirs edited by O'Brian. The trips range from Lady Crave (1780) traveling in luxury to Constantinople to "The Distresses on the Unfortunate Crew of the Ship Anne and Mary from Norway to Ireland in the Year 1759" in which bad weather forces the sailors to draw straws to see who will eat who.

If you enjoy the Flashman books, check out The Devil Drives: A Life of Sir Richard Burton. This is a bio of the Victorian explorer, soldier, and spy, not to be confused with Elizabeth Taylor's husband. In many ways, Burton was the role model for Harry Flashman. He's also fictionalized as one of the main characters in Philip José Farmer's Riverworld series which I also recommend.

Continuing the theme of (a) travel and (b) eccentric British adventurers, I'll suggest The Places In-between by Rory Stewart. In January 2002 Stewart walked across Afghanistan. This was a few months after the US invasion and things were still very very chaotic. Stewart is an Oxford educated diplomat and former soldier (and possible MI-6 agent) fluent in multiple languages who decided to walk across Asia. This book is about the Afghan part of the walk. gordonm888 mentioned A Walk in the Hindu Kush which covers some of the same terrain in 1956 so the two books might complement each other.

Other non-fiction recommendations are

  • Rocket Boy by Homer Hickam
  • Dreadnaught and Castles of Steel by Peter Massie
  • any book by John McPhee


For fiction, a lot of my favorites have already been mention but I'll add

  • if you like dry humour a'la Catch22 then read Confederacy of Dunces
  • for SF, Lord of Light by Zelazny, Child of Fortune by Norm Spinrad
  • Snow Crash, Diamond Age, and The Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson The 1st 2 are Sci-Fi and the last is historical fiction with a techno twist.
  • Kipling's Kim is one of my all-time favorites that I re-read every couple of years
  • both Perdido Street and The City and the City by China Mieville (not sure how to classify them)
  • if you like mysteries in the flavor of Rex Stout and Agatha Christie, try the Judge Dee books by Robert Van Gulik. These take place in China during the Tang Dynasty (~ 650 CE) and are best when read in order starting with The Chinese Maze Murders. I would skip the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee which was written in the 18th century and translated by Gulik in 1949


Finally, if short stories are your thing then anything by O'Henry and Isaac Babel. The former is well known but most folks have never heard of Babel, a Russian Jew who was purged and executed by Stalin in 1940. Hemingway considered Babel to be the greatest short story writer in any language. I especially recommend Red Calvary which is based on Babel's experiences in 1920 when he was attached to a Cossack cavalry regiment durring the russian Civil War.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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August 11th, 2019 at 1:24:38 PM permalink
Currently reading:

Master and Commander, Patrick O'Brian

Thunderbolt Kid, Bryson,

Papa Hemingway, Hotchner, (4th time at least)

The Seminary, Paul Hendrickson

Hemingway's Boat, Hendrickson,

Travels Here and There, Bryson,

Medium Raw, Tony Bourdain
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Rigondeaux
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August 11th, 2019 at 3:09:47 PM permalink
I like Bryson. If you like travel writing, Paul Thereux is really good too. He's a little denser though.

Some Brit friends turned me on to AA Gill. He is not very well known in the U.S. but he is pretty famous over there as a restaurant critic and stuff. He has a couple of really good travel books. Very witty and cutting. He famously feuded with Gordon Ramsay. A good sign since Ramsay is a prick. Though he does make a tasty burger.

Found this excerpt from a restaurant review:

So why do the Americans and English come here? Men who, at home, are finickity and fussy about everything, who consider themselves epicurean and cultured. Men who choose their own ties and are trusted with scissors and corporations, who have ďsophisticatedĒ on their Facebook pages. Why do they continue to come here? They canít all have brain tumors. The only rationally conceivable answer is: Paris. Paris has superpowers; Paris exerts a mercurial force field. This old city has such compelling cultural connotations and aesthetic pheromones, such a nostalgically beguiling cast list, that it defies judgment. Itís a confidence trick that can make oreille de cochon out of a sowís earóreputation and expectation are the MSG of fine dining.

But still, itís undeniable that LíAmi Louis really is special and apart. It has earned an epic accolade. It is, all things considered, entre nous, the worst restaurant in the world.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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August 11th, 2019 at 4:12:45 PM permalink
Anybody ever read any Louis L'Amour? I've
never been able to. 90 novels, sold 200
million copies. They just don't seem very
well written.


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gordonm888
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August 11th, 2019 at 6:06:10 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Anybody ever read any Louis L'Amour? I've
never been able to. 90 novels, sold 200
million copies. They just don't seem very
well written.



Yes, I married a woman who owned some Louis L'Amour novels (and almost no novels by other authors) and so I read two of them. "Cowboy Saves Woman." They were very readable but not well-written, like an early form of gothic romance novels.. Ultimately, I decided to keep my wife and toss out the Louis L'Amour books.
So many better men, a few of them friends, are dead. And a thousand thousand slimy things live on, and so do I.
EvenBob
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August 11th, 2019 at 8:29:53 PM permalink
Quote: gordonm888

They were very readable but not well-written, like an early form of gothic romance novels..



They were formulaic. Good guy, bad guy, damsel
in distress/widow/virgin school teacher. Good
guy destroys bad guy, wins damsel. They were
all the same with lots of action to fill in the story.
L'Amour churned them out like a factory and
he had a dedicated following. If he only made
10 cents a book that's still $20 mil over a lifetime.
My dad/granddad/great granddad read them
as fast as they came out.

They always had great covers of the lone cowboy
hero:




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kubikulann
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beachbumbabs
August 12th, 2019 at 8:48:18 AM permalink
Very curious thread.
Just like holidays photos. We love to show ours, we donít give a dime for othersí.

So, for nobodyí iInterest but mine, here is my current readings:

Present-day literature: M. Houellebecq, « Sérotonine »
Modern literature: P. Drieu La Rochelle, « Le feu follet »
Classics: N. Machiavelli, « Il Principe »
Thriller: J. Abbott, « Cut and Run »
Fantasy / SF: N. Stephenson, « Anathem »
Poetry: P. Neruda, « Los versos del capitán »
Language: J. Cohen, « Structure du langage poétique »
and J. Haudry, « Líindo-européen »
Science: F. De Waal, « Are we smart enough to know how smart animals are? »
Math: J. Nahin, « Dr. Eulerís Fabulous Formula »
Economics: Th. Piketty, « Le Capital au XXIème siècle »
Philosophy: R. Scruton, « Beauty » and F. Lebrun, « La Beauté »
History: J. Op de Beeck, « Het Verlies van België 1830 »
Romanced history: C. McCullough, « Fortuneís Favourites »


I recommend strongly the De Waal book, you learn lots of things about animal intelligence and emotion.
For leisure, I love everything by Jeff Abbott (pure action thriller) and Neal Stephenson (parallel universe).

Older but worth a read for History buffs: Bernard Cornwell and his Sharpe series, set in Napoleonic times. I liked it better than OíBrian or the Capt. Hornblower séries by C.S. Forester.
Last edited by: kubikulann on Aug 12, 2019
Reperiet qui quaesiverit
terapined
terapined
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August 12th, 2019 at 9:36:16 AM permalink
The Passage by Justin Cronin
Up to page 212, pretty good
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EvenBob
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petroglyph
August 12th, 2019 at 10:11:07 AM permalink
Quote: kubikulann

Very curious thread.
Just like holidays photos. We love to show ours, we donít give a dime for othersí.



Why would you ever post for 'others..
I post for my own edification, why
else would I bother. If someone reads
it, goody. If they don't, why would I
possibly care. Posting for others is
a vast waste of time.
It does not suck to be me.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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August 13th, 2019 at 10:34:31 AM permalink
Is this only for gambling books now?
I don't read those anymore, I write
them.
It does not suck to be me.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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August 13th, 2019 at 12:27:52 PM permalink
Enjoying Bourdain's book Medium Raw.
He was a writer before he wrote Kitchen
Confidential. He had published a novel.
He's a pretty good writer. Too bad he
didn't start his TV career till his mid 40's.
It does not suck to be me.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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August 15th, 2019 at 2:13:56 PM permalink
Like most, I started reading with comic
books. I devoured them, and reread
and reread them. What I didn't know
was, I just missed the golden era of
comic books.

From 1940 till 1955, they were huge.
10's of millions a month huge. There
were 650 titles, which, because of TV,
went down to 250 by the mid 50's.

Even adults read them because until
1955, they were loaded with big boobed
women wearing almost nothing. That
all changed when congress passed a
law that cleaned them up. You still
had some of the women, but not like
before. This in when the wholesome
comics took over. Archie, Little Lulu,
Nancy, all the Disney characters had
their own comics. And many of the
superheroes were born in the late
50's and early 60's.

These are 1946, never heard of any
of them.



{img=https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/a10AAOSwgdtcVjYh/s-l300.jpg]


sheena__queen_of_the_jungle__11___page_1_super.jpg]
It does not suck to be me.
ams288
ams288
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August 15th, 2019 at 2:50:09 PM permalink
Quote: terapined

The Passage by Justin Cronin
Up to page 212, pretty good



Iíve read the entire trilogy.

The Passage is the best. It completely changes tracts early on into a post-apocalyptic story. That abrupt change in characters and storytelling takes some getting used to. But once it gets going again, itís great.

As a bonus, they visit a post-apocalyptic Las Vegas at one point.
Ding Dong the Witch is Dead
EvenBob
EvenBob
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August 15th, 2019 at 3:06:58 PM permalink
Quote: ams288



As a bonus, they visit a post-apocalyptic Las Vegas at one point.



I thought that's what the present
Vegas was.
It does not suck to be me.
lilredrooster
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August 16th, 2019 at 11:00:35 AM permalink
Hemingway's short story "Fifty Grand" is about a crooked boxing match
William Faulkner called it the greatest American short story ever written


all of Hemingway's short stories can be read for free at the link
"Fifty Grand" is on page 185


https://antilogicalism.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/hemingway.pdf
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EvenBob
EvenBob
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August 16th, 2019 at 12:34:11 PM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

Hemingway's short story "Fifty Grand" is about a crooked boxing match
William Faulkner called it the greatest American short story ever written



Hemingway was the master of short
stories. Read 'Big Two Hearted River'
or 'The Hills Like White Elephants'.
He sets a mood like nobody else.

He later claimed all his novels
started out as short stories. You
start with an idea and it expands
and expands till you have an actual
book.
It does not suck to be me.
TumblingBones
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August 17th, 2019 at 8:36:47 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Like most, I started reading with comic
books. I devoured them, and reread
and reread them.



For me the addiction was Sci-Fi. I still have, after 60+ years, one of the Tom Swift Jr books I read as a kid.
Last edited by: TumblingBones on Aug 17, 2019
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
Face
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Face
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August 17th, 2019 at 10:43:23 AM permalink
Quote: TumblingBones

For me the addiction was Sci-Fi. I still have, after 60+ years, one of the Tom Swift Jr books I read as a kid.



Tom Swift! Jesus wept, I just uncovered 5 or so of these last year when I gutted my basement. Haven't thought of them in 25yrs.
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lilredrooster
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August 31st, 2019 at 3:23:36 AM permalink
"The Killer Inside Me" by Jim Thompson




very creative and compelling crime fiction

written in the first person................................. the narrator is a killer
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EvenBob
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August 31st, 2019 at 10:35:23 AM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

very creative and compelling crime fiction

written in the first person................................. the narrator is a killer



Hemingway wrote a couple of his novels
in the first person. He said it draws people
into the story more than 3rd person does.
It does not suck to be me.
TigerWu
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August 31st, 2019 at 10:46:43 AM permalink
Gamblers of Yesteryear by Russell Barnhart.

Stories of Generals and Princes in the 1600-1800's playing with PILES of gold coins on single bet. That would be crazy to see.
EvenBob
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August 31st, 2019 at 11:13:03 AM permalink
Quote: TigerWu

Gamblers of Yesteryear by Russell Barnhart.

Stories of Generals and Princes in the 1600-1800's playing with PILES of gold coins on single bet. That would be crazy to see.



They bet with real money playing
roulette. Usually different currencies.
There were often heated arguments
over who owned what bet. It took
so long to do payouts that they
only got in half a dozen spins an hour.
It does not suck to be me.
lilredrooster
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August 31st, 2019 at 11:14:07 AM permalink
Quote: TigerWu

Gamblers of Yesteryear by Russell Barnhart.

Stories of Generals and Princes in the 1600-1800's playing with PILES of gold coins on single bet. That would be crazy to see.




yeah, his book "Beating the Wheel" about a few who found a way to beat roulette was a really fun read - they way he tells the stories is great
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TigerWu
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August 31st, 2019 at 2:52:25 PM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster

Quote: TigerWu

Gamblers of Yesteryear by Russell Barnhart.

Stories of Generals and Princes in the 1600-1800's playing with PILES of gold coins on single bet. That would be crazy to see.




yeah, his book "Beating the Wheel" about a few who found a way to beat roulette was a really fun read - they way he tells the stories is great



Cool, haven't heard of that one... I'll have to check it out! I, too, like his writing style.
billryan
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September 1st, 2019 at 1:54:31 AM permalink
Quote: Face

Quote: TumblingBones

For me the addiction was Sci-Fi. I still have, after 60+ years, one of the Tom Swift Jr books I read as a kid.



Tom Swift! Jesus wept, I just uncovered 5 or so of these last year when I gutted my basement. Haven't thought of them in 25yrs.



While the Hardy Boys were my books of choice, I read a fair amount of Tom Swift Jr.books. A few years ago, Amazon had a sale on the original Tom Swift series. They were impossible to read.
The difference between fiction and reality is that fiction is supposed to make sense.
EvenBob
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September 1st, 2019 at 7:36:35 PM permalink
Quote: billryan



While the Hardy Boys were my books of choice,



HB was my cocaine when I was
in 5th 6th grade. I even wrote
to Franklin Dixon and got a
response. My dream was to
own all the books.
When I learned in HS that Dixon
was just a pen name for a whole
fleet of HB writers over the years,
I never really got over it. There
was no Franklin Dixon, it was all
a sham.
It does not suck to be me.
Jimmy2Times
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September 1st, 2019 at 9:26:18 PM permalink
Just finished reading, "The Onion Picker - Carmen Basilio and Boxing in the 1950s". A very nice read, especially the part about the Mob's control of boxing during the 1950s - something that despite heavy pressure, Carmen Basilio never gave in to. In additional to very complete coverage of Carmen Basilio's life before and after boxing as well as his boxing career, the book has lots of great information about the DeJohn Brothers (a local Syracuse, NY family of boxers) and the Carmen Basilio - Sugar Ray Robinson rivalry. When I was about 8 years old my Father introduced me to Carmen Basilio at a boxing card in Syracuse. "So Lou, hows your boy doing in the amateurs?" My father said, "Ah, we are just getting started", and then Carmen Basilio clipped me with a lighting-fast powder puff jab and said, "Well he needs to keep his hands up!". I was the happiest kid in the arena that night! Heard a rumor that there is a movie in the works for the life story of Carmen Basilio to be shot in Canastota (Basilio's home town in central New York) and in Syracuse. Will be attending the Festa Italiana in Syracuse in a few weeks and will touch bases with some of my buddies that are still kickin and get the scoop on the movie, the scoop on the movie.
I 'm gonna go get the papers, get the papers.
lilredrooster
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Thanks for this post from:
Jimmy2Times
September 2nd, 2019 at 12:16:10 AM permalink
Quote: Jimmy2Times

Just finished reading, "The Onion Picker - Carmen Basilio and Boxing in the 1950s". A very nice read, especially the part about the Mob's control of boxing during the 1950s - something that despite heavy pressure, Carmen Basilio never gave in to. In additional to very complete coverage of Carmen Basilio's life before and after boxing as well as his boxing career, the book has lots of great information about the DeJohn Brothers (a local Syracuse, NY family of boxers) and the Carmen Basilio - Sugar Ray Robinson rivalry. When I was about 8 years old my Father introduced me to Carmen Basilio at a boxing card in Syracuse. "So Lou, hows your boy doing in the amateurs?" My father said, "Ah, we are just getting started", and then Carmen Basilio clipped me with a lighting-fast powder puff jab and said, "Well he needs to keep his hands up!". I was the happiest kid in the arena that night! Heard a rumor that there is a movie in the works for the life story of Carmen Basilio to be shot in Canastota (Basilio's home town in central New York) and in Syracuse. Will be attending the Festa Italiana in Syracuse in a few weeks and will touch bases with some of my buddies that are still kickin and get the scoop on the movie, the scoop on the movie.



I want to read that and see that movie - thanks for the post - I've seen some clips of Basilio - he was one tough little guy - only 5'6" - great fighter

he had a lot of fights - his record was 56-16-7 - he was trained by Angelo Dundee

I met another tough little guy boxer from an earlier era - Eddie Leonard - who had a string of sub shops around where I lived - he wasn't at Basilio's level
Last edited by: lilredrooster on Sep 2, 2019
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TumblingBones
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September 2nd, 2019 at 8:14:56 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

HB was my cocaine when I was
in 5th 6th grade. I even wrote
to Franklin Dixon and got a
response. My dream was to
own all the books.
When I learned in HS that Dixon
was just a pen name for a whole
fleet of HB writers over the years,
I never really got over it. There
was no Franklin Dixon, it was all
a sham.


Hmmm, could this childhood disappointment have in later years shaped your political views?
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 2nd, 2019 at 10:38:02 AM permalink
Quote: TumblingBones

Hmmm, could this childhood disappointment have in later years shaped your political views?



Why would it do that.
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TumblingBones
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September 2nd, 2019 at 2:48:44 PM permalink
Maybe a tendency towards cynicism in regards to the veracity of authority figures?
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
TumblingBones
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Thanks for this post from:
kubikulann
September 2nd, 2019 at 2:58:51 PM permalink
to quote Ralph Waldo Emerson:
I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 2nd, 2019 at 8:01:23 PM permalink
Quote: TumblingBones

to quote Ralph Waldo Emerson:
I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.



Somebody I know that shaped me
was Robert Heinlein. His adult
sci/fi books read when I was in
Jr High and HS. Especially Stranger
in a Strange Land and Glory Road,
Farnham's Freehold. Time Enough
for Love and I Will Fear No Evil, later.
Heinlein had a hard line when it
came to women, and I know I tried
to be like him. He was a real
hardcore chauvinist.

Just looking at his book covers is
kind of exciting, I read most of
his early sci/fi and loved all of it.

https://www.google.com/search?q=heinlein+books&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS853US853&oq=heinlein+books&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.6418j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
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kubikulann
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September 3rd, 2019 at 3:20:14 AM permalink
Quote: TumblingBones

to quote Ralph Waldo Emerson:
I cannot remember the books I've read any more than the meals I have eaten; even so, they have made me.

Wonderful quote. Thank you. It helps accepting the sorry state of our memory.

« Culture is what remains when youíve forgotten everything. »
Reperiet qui quaesiverit
kubikulann
kubikulann
Joined: Jun 28, 2011
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September 3rd, 2019 at 3:26:25 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Just looking at his book covers is
kind of exciting, I read most of
his early sci/fi and loved all of it.

https://www.google.com/search?q=heinlein+books&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS853US853&oq=heinlein+books&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.6418j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Such is Google that when clicking on this link I got a list of covers ...of French translations!

(Normally, google.com was for the American version, and you had google.fr or google.be/fr for French. But apparently they changed it and force you... I like when programs allow me more choice. I hate it when they choose for me.)
Reperiet qui quaesiverit
TumblingBones
TumblingBones
Joined: Dec 25, 2016
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Thanks for this post from:
beachbumbabs
September 3rd, 2019 at 3:00:09 PM permalink
I spent most of this past weekend going thru about 8 boxes of old Sci-Fi paperbacks that had been down in the basement for years but had thru some miracle survived the hurricane that flooded our basement 8 years ago. I sorted them into three piles:
  1. Books to keep (i.e., stuff worth re-reading every few years)
  2. Books to get rid of ASAP (i.e., donate to local library)
  3. Books I wanted to read one last time before donating.

All the Heinlein books went into Group 1. Ditto Edgar Rice Burrough's Barsoom series. What surprised me a bit was the stuff I used to love ~40 years ago that in retrospect lacked enough depth(?) to interest me now. Main example: almost everything by Larry Niven wasn't worth the self space. The authors with consistently high quality that went into the "Keep" pile, besides Heinlein and Burroughs, are
  • David Brin
  • Julian May (the Pliocene Exile and [Galactic Milieu series)
  • everything by Azimov
  • Farmer's Riverworld series
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 3rd, 2019 at 4:32:31 PM permalink
Quote: TumblingBones

  • everything by Azimov


  • At one time Azimov had more books
    in print than anybody in history, over
    400. He had a high genius IQ and
    could write a science book in 10 hours,
    but it took him 30 hours to write
    a sci/fi novel.

    He owned 4 Selectric typewriters.
    The one he was using, a spare,
    and two that were always in repair.
    He was hugely superstitious and
    neurotic. He was always imagining
    disasters in his life that never happened.
    If his wife was 3 min late getting home
    that meant she had been hit by a
    falling piano or stepped into an open
    manhole.
    It does not suck to be me.
    EvenBob
    EvenBob
    Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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    September 4th, 2019 at 12:09:09 PM permalink
    Totally enjoying Bill Bryson's book
    The Thunderbolt Kid, about him
    growing up in Iowa in the 50's.
    It's my story too, it's every kid's
    story if you grew up in the
    Midwest. I was looking up the
    town where his grandparents
    lived and stumbled upon a
    docu Bryson made in 2006
    for the books debut. I looked
    on Utube and there it was.

    I had a tear in my eye over how
    wonderful Youtube is. I'm a
    library and bookstore guy, I
    had to ferret out info the
    painstaking way for decades.
    To be able to do it in my home
    office is like magic to me, it's
    literally a dream come true.
    It does not suck to be me.
    EvenBob
    EvenBob
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    Thanks for this post from:
    beachbumbabs
    September 10th, 2019 at 3:12:01 PM permalink
    Bought my first Heinlein book
    since the 80's. Read it when I
    was 14 and it had a big effect
    on me. I want to find out why.

    It does not suck to be me.
    beachbumbabs
    Administrator
    beachbumbabs
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    Thanks for this post from:
    TumblingBones
    September 10th, 2019 at 5:21:56 PM permalink
    My first Heinlein was Citizen of the Galaxy. I think i was 10 or so. It made a HUGE impression on me, and remains in my top 5 Heinleins.

    It warms my heart to see you mention him repeatedly.

    You younger guys who don't read much, you would like his books a lot.
    If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
    ams288
    ams288
    Joined: Sep 26, 2012
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    September 10th, 2019 at 6:39:17 PM permalink
    Went to a big used book sale this weekend. Bought a ton. On Sunday they had it so you could fill a paper grocery bag with as many books as possible for $8.

    Currently reading Cell by Stephen King.
    Ding Dong the Witch is Dead
    EvenBob
    EvenBob
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    September 10th, 2019 at 7:39:51 PM permalink
    Quote: beachbumbabs

    My first Heinlein was Citizen of the Galaxy. I think i was 10 or so. It made a HUGE impression on me, and remains in my top 5 Heinleins.



    I read all Heinlein books geared
    towards juveniles thanks to my
    school and public library. Have
    Spacesuit Will Travel was one of
    my fave's, as well as Starship
    Troopers. But they were all
    good, as well all of Philip K
    Dick's books.
    It does not suck to be me.
    gordonm888
    Administrator
    gordonm888
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    September 10th, 2019 at 7:56:59 PM permalink
    Quote: EvenBob

    Somebody I know that shaped me
    was Robert Heinlein. His adult
    sci/fi books read when I was in
    Jr High and HS. Especially Stranger
    in a Strange Land and Glory Road,
    Farnham's Freehold. Time Enough
    for Love and I Will Fear No Evil, later.
    Heinlein had a hard line when it
    came to women, and I know I tried
    to be like him. He was a real
    hardcore chauvinist.

    Just looking at his book covers is
    kind of exciting, I read most of
    his early sci/fi and loved all of it.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=heinlein+books&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS853US853&oq=heinlein+books&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.6418j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8



    I loved Heinlein. Favorites were The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress; Double Star; Citizen of the Galaxy; The Rolling Stones, Podkayne of Mars
    So many better men, a few of them friends, are dead. And a thousand thousand slimy things live on, and so do I.
    beachbumbabs
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    beachbumbabs
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    September 10th, 2019 at 8:12:42 PM permalink
    Quote: gordonm888

    I loved Heinlein. Favorites were The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress; Double Star; Citizen of the Galaxy; The Rolling Stones, Podkayne of Mars



    Moon is a Harsh Mistress is my #1 Heinlein. I also loved reading later books that brought some of those characters back, though a couple were just silly. I also liked I Will Fear No Evil, Stranger, and any story about Lazarus Long. I have them all, one of 3 guys I think I have everything they ever published. Might have to go get a Heinlein fix this week. Think it's been a year.

    BTW, you guys who love Heinlein, should consider reading John Varley if you haven't. He's a great writer on his own, and writes deliberately (spiritually) faithful to Heinlein's Future History (not plagiarizing), but his are called the 8 World Stories (he has some other books too, but 8W are the best ones). Most blurbs will mention if it's an 8 world book.
    If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.

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