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rdw4potus
rdw4potus
Joined: Mar 11, 2010
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July 22nd, 2011 at 7:19:32 AM permalink
WinnaVegas near Omaha is reopening and boat/driving customers to the currently-on-an-island casino. I might drive down just to say I visited...
"So as the clock ticked and the day passed, opportunity met preparation, and luck happened." - Maurice Clarett
RoyalBJ
RoyalBJ
Joined: Jul 18, 2011
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July 22nd, 2011 at 10:19:56 AM permalink
the Blackjack tables at WinnaVegas have a "TIP" circle opposite to the SHORTIE side bet (i.e. SHORTIE Blackjack). Have you seen them? Have you seen any other casinos having a "TIP" circle on the layouts?
rdw4potus
rdw4potus
Joined: Mar 11, 2010
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July 22nd, 2011 at 10:33:45 AM permalink
Quote: RoyalBJ

the Blackjack tables at WinnaVegas have a "TIP" circle opposite to the SHORTIE side bet (i.e. SHORTIE Blackjack). Have you seen them? Have you seen any other casinos having a "TIP" circle on the layouts?



I've never seen that before, but I'm not necessarily opposed. Especially on busy layouts where it's not clear where a tip bet would/could/should be placed, I see this as more helpful than forceful.

*edit* just saw your picture in the dealer tip sharing thread. That layout does *not* meet my definition of busy. I do usually place my tips at the 10 o'clock position (where the Shortie bet is), and most side bets are at 2 o'clock (lucky ladies, luckylucky, over/under13, etc.) So maybe the distributor thought this would help clear up confusion and avoid mis-placed bets? Of course, the positions could just be reversed as well...
"So as the clock ticked and the day passed, opportunity met preparation, and luck happened." - Maurice Clarett
RoyalBJ
RoyalBJ
Joined: Jul 18, 2011
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July 22nd, 2011 at 10:48:11 AM permalink
I do table layout design, so you're right. I was told by the TGD at WinnaVegas that they ALWAYS have the TIP circle at 2 o'clock, thus SHORTIE has to be moved to 10 o'clock. May be I will start a poll to see if anyone has seen the "TIP" circle anywhere.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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July 22nd, 2011 at 12:22:11 PM permalink
Quote:

Two Words: Duck Boats


One question: What does "Duck Boats" mean?
Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁 Note that the same could be said for Religion. I.E. Religion is nothing more than organized superstition. 🤗
JohnnyQ
JohnnyQ
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July 22nd, 2011 at 6:37:00 PM permalink
The Duck Boats I know of are popular at tourist destinations.

They are sea/land amphibious military vehicles, I believe from
the Korea era, but don't quote me on that.

We used to ride them at the Wisconsin Dells. I don't live
close enough to go anymore, but I always liked the Ho-Chunk
casino just south of there.
You know the type always acting cool, Pretender;Take the risk or give up your cards, Pretender, Oh, Oh. - Iris/Avsec
FleaStiff
FleaStiff 
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July 22nd, 2011 at 7:20:44 PM permalink
There were standard letter designations for contracted equipment during world war two.. and it simply turned out that it was pronounced as Duck. It was not chosen for its nautical or amphibious associations.

The boat is really the famed Deuce and a Half truck that, together with the Higgins boats, really won the war. The two and a half ton truck was a military truck that formed the basis for all specialty vehicles such as ambulances, field kitchens, General's Quarters, etc. Everything was a two and a half ton truck with a specialized module on it. It was a pre-Pearl Harbor decision to design the truck and it was to their great credit that the engineers insisted the Deuce and a Half be a military truck without what today would be "gold plating" and non standardized equipment.

The engineers told to design an amphibious vehicle during the war were ordered to start with the Deuce and a Half. It nearly got cancelled but when a truck went out and rescued a coast guard sloop the kept the program. And even though the amphibious vehicles were almost left behind for the Normandy invasion, the truck proved useful and would often be the the third vehicle in any truck convoy.

It was often tricky and there were two models made but in general it performed well as an amphibious vehicle. Patton's tanks could not have traveled quite so fast without bridges and its simply easier and faster to build a bridge from both sides of a stream and safer to get some troops across to the other side to suppress sniper fire.

These WWTwo surplus vehicles are great tourist attractions since they can cruise streets as an advertisement and pickup tourists on the spot and then simply proceed to a boat ramp.

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