AceCrAAckers
AceCrAAckers
Joined: Jul 12, 2011
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July 26th, 2011 at 9:09:13 PM permalink
I know there is no such thing as an international patent. Has anyone filed a PTC and has it been beneficial? I am looking into this now because it is approaching one year since my US patent application. Another cost to persue the end of the rainbow. Only time will tell if there is a pot a gold waiting for me there or only illusions and disappointment.
Edward Snowden is not the criminal, the government is for violating the constitution!
Switch
Switch
Joined: Apr 29, 2010
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July 27th, 2011 at 2:22:57 AM permalink
I filed a PCT once and it allowed me to extend my provisional for an other 18 months before deciding what to do. It wasn't particularly beneficial to me and it's quite expensive.

Are you aiming to protect your game outside the US? If so, then have you had any decent contact or enquiries from overseas?
MathExtremist
MathExtremist
Joined: Aug 31, 2010
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July 27th, 2011 at 7:48:51 AM permalink
You really need to talk to your attorney, or get one if you don't have one already. There is no such thing as an "international" patent, but virtually all foreign countries have their own patent laws and foreign patent processes. However, the UK and EPO countries do not allow patents on methods for playing games (or software, or business methods...). If what you have is a method for dealing cards, it's not patentable subject matter overseas.

See http://www.ipo.gov.uk/patentsact1977.pdf
Section 1-(2)(c)

Also see article 52 of the EPC which says the same thing
http://www.epo.org/law-practice/legal-texts/html/epc/2010/e/ar52.html
"In my own case, when it seemed to me after a long illness that death was close at hand, I found no little solace in playing constantly at dice." -- Girolamo Cardano, 1563
AceCrAAckers
AceCrAAckers
Joined: Jul 12, 2011
  • Threads: 30
  • Posts: 368
July 27th, 2011 at 4:47:35 PM permalink
Quote: MathExtremist

You really need to talk to your attorney, or get one if you don't have one already. There is no such thing as an "international" patent, but virtually all foreign countries have their own patent laws and foreign patent processes. However, the UK and EPO countries do not allow patents on methods for playing games (or software, or business methods...). If what you have is a method for dealing cards, it's not patentable subject matter overseas.

See http://www.ipo.gov.uk/patentsact1977.pdf
Section 1-(2)(c)

Also see article 52 of the EPC which says the same thing
http://www.epo.org/law-practice/legal-texts/html/epc/2010/e/ar52.html



Does this apply to Australia? How about Macau? Three card poker is patented by Webb in UK. Did the law/patent requirement change? Before I move forward, I like to be informed. PCT will cost 3-4k and want to know if this is worth it. Anyone with info will be appreciated.
Edward Snowden is not the criminal, the government is for violating the constitution!
THESWEENEY
THESWEENEY
Joined: Feb 28, 2011
  • Threads: 14
  • Posts: 82
July 27th, 2011 at 5:04:11 PM permalink
Quote: MathExtremist

You really need to talk to your attorney, or get one if you don't have one already. There is no such thing as an "international" patent, but virtually all foreign countries have their own patent laws and foreign patent processes. However, the UK and EPO countries do not allow patents on methods for playing games (or software, or business methods...). If what you have is a method for dealing cards, it's not patentable subject matter overseas.

See http://www.ipo.gov.uk/patentsact1977.pdf
Section 1-(2)(c)

Also see article 52 of the EPC which says the same thing
http://www.epo.org/law-practice/legal-texts/html/epc/2010/e/ar52.html



I think this thread alludes to the Patent Cooperation Treaty, although, I believe you are correct in stating "the UK and EPO countries do not allow patents on methods for playing games (or software, or business methods...)."

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