Wizard
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Wizard 
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onenickelmiracle
November 22nd, 2016 at 4:05:56 PM permalink
Two possibilities that I see why Ivey plays craps:

1. His craps play was an effort to appear like a more recreational gambler, to throw the casino off the trail of whatever advantage play he was up to on another game.

2. He just likes craps and plays it as a mindless diversion. Same reason I play pai gow tiles sometimes -- I know its negative but I just like the game and the expected loss is worth my entertainment value.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
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November 22nd, 2016 at 5:55:02 PM permalink
He's a self admitted "action junkie." He'll bet on just about anything.
DUHHIIIIIIIII HEARD THAT!
DRich
DRich
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November 23rd, 2016 at 6:34:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Two possibilities that I see why Ivey plays craps:

1. His craps play was an effort to appear like a more recreational gambler, to throw the casino off the trail of whatever advantage play he was up to on another game.

2. He just likes craps and plays it as a mindless diversion. Same reason I play pai gow tiles sometimes -- I know its negative but I just like the game and the expected loss is worth my entertainment value.



I have never met Mr. Ivey but what I hear from friends is that he is really an action junkie. When he is not on an advantage play he will bet on just about anything at high stakes with friends just so he has action.
Order from chaos
wudged
wudged
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November 23rd, 2016 at 8:04:16 AM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

Maybe they figure people won't do the math.



How else do you think casinos exist? :)
RogerKint
RogerKint
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November 23rd, 2016 at 10:51:55 AM permalink
Quote: wudged

How else do you think casinos exist? :)



They just got lucky on a Martingale once.
100% risk of ruin
BobDancer
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CasinoKillerLuckyPhow
November 25th, 2016 at 12:12:13 AM permalink
Next Tuesday we pretape an interview with Bob Nersesian on GWAE --- probably for airing December 7.

The Phil Ivey ruling is on the list to be discussed.

Is there anything about this case you'd like us to consider asking him?

If there are other things you wish to suggest asking him, let me know.
beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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onenickelmiracle
November 25th, 2016 at 6:47:54 AM permalink
I'm curious whether he thinks Borgata would have risked the public scrutiny and criticism if the London case hadn't been brought, or had been unsuccessful. A quiet settlement might have been wise.


Personally, between this and the mess of the counterfeited tournament chips and the hash they made of restitution to the other players, I think they've lost more business that they protected by pursuing Phil Ivey alresdy, not to mention future impact. They should have protected their game better. But I'm far from an expert.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
Wizard
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Wizard 
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onenickelmiracle
November 25th, 2016 at 7:33:31 AM permalink
I'm curious about his opinion on the many what I'll call "32-bit integer malfunction" cases. I know of three and sure there are others I'm not aware of. Here is a link to a recent case: Woman denied $43M slot machine win, offered steak dinner instead.

The facts of each case are basically the same:

1. The machine used an unsigned 32-bit integer to store the player's balance, which is routine for storing integers that aren't supposed to ever be negative. When storing the number pennies in the player's balance it can range from $0.00 to $42,949,672.95. That maximum amount is 2^32 - 1 pennies.

2. Through a programming error, somehow the player's balance did go negative, by several pennies.

3. If you subtract x from y, with unsigned integers, where x>y, the computer will wrap around the maximum value. For example, if the player's balance was 10 cents, and you subtract 15 cents from it, the value for the balance will be $42,949,672.96 - $0.05 = $42,949,672.91.

4. The player will then ask to be paid this amount.

5. Of course, the casino will quote the ubiquitous "malfunction" rule.

6. The player will get an attorney who will probably argue the machine didn't malfunction but did exactly what some bad programmer told it to do. In other words, say it was "human error."

I've never heard of a case that wasn't settled out of court.

After all that set up, I'm not sure what my question is for Mr. Nercesian. If forced, what is his opinions on the merits and weaknesses of both sides of such cases? Also, if he were representing such a player, what is the ballpark of a settlement offer he would accept?
Last edited by: Wizard on Nov 25, 2016
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
LuckyPhow
LuckyPhow
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November 25th, 2016 at 11:14:12 AM permalink
Bob,

Regarding the Phil Ivey battle with Borgata, I'd be interested in Nersesian's take on this question:

The NJ gaming regulations are VERY specific. Concerning Baccarat, the regulations specify in detail which hand the dealer must use when extracting cards from the shoe and the exact words to be spoken at various points during a hand of Baccarat.

As soon as Borgata deviated from the proscribed requirements in the NJ gaming regulations, I believe Borgata -- at that moment -- was no longer playing a legal gaming contest authorized for play in NJ. (Obviously, the judge found otherwise.) What is Bob Nersesian's opinion on the legality of the Baccarat "rules" Borgata offered when it accommodated Phil Ivey's play request?
DRich
DRich
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MathExtremist
November 25th, 2016 at 11:38:34 AM permalink
Quote: LuckyPhow


As soon as Borgata deviated from the proscribed requirements in the NJ gaming regulations, I believe Borgata -- at that moment -- was no longer playing a legal gaming contest authorized for play in NJ. (Obviously, the judge found otherwise.)



Actually, I think the Division of Gaming agrees with you. I believe their contention is that any game not following the rules is null and void no matter what the outcome is.
Order from chaos

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