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Mosca
Mosca
Joined: Dec 14, 2009
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August 9th, 2019 at 1:41:04 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

And there you have it. The reason
students prefer screens is, they're
forced to pay less attention and
comprehend less. It's just a form
of mental masturbation, you
aren't really accomplishing anything.

I've tried ebooks many times and
they just don't hold my attention.



I think they like not having to interact with a physical object.

I canít recall where I read it, but research has been done that shows that ebooks face competition from the internet; a reader will read for a bit, then open a browser and visit forums etc. Iíve found that to be true for myself. Attention span is shorter on a tablet.
NO KILL I
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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August 9th, 2019 at 1:56:14 PM permalink
Quote: Mosca

a reader will read for a bit, then open a browser and visit forums etc. Iíve found that to be true for myself. Attention span is shorter on a tablet.



The average time 'just checking' is
around 20 min, before you get
back to what you were doing.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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August 9th, 2019 at 3:07:24 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

And there you have it. The reason
students prefer screens is, they're
forced to pay less attention and
comprehend less. It's just a form
of mental masturbation, you
aren't really accomplishing anything.

I've tried ebooks many times and
they just don't hold my attention.



I offered to loan a guy a book I forget which. Guy said he canít read non kindle anymore. Iíve never owned a kindle.

I used to read everything now I read more in snippets. Articles or things vs full books. Iíve read so many business books Iím kind of done. I now read more how to articles. Unless it is gambling or mafia related. I eat those up.
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
Joined: May 8, 2015
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August 10th, 2019 at 6:45:21 AM permalink
"The Trial" - Franz Kafka - people hear the name Kafka and they think it's heavy deep stuff - but this book is an easy read

set a long time ago in Russia - and innocent man faces a bureaucratic nightmare

he's charged with a crime and he can't even find out what crime it is he's charged with

he can't find out anything about the status of his case or even when the trial will be

it's chilling
𝘈 𝘮𝘢𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘬𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘣𝘺 𝘮𝘰𝘶𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘥 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘦 𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴.... ᴴᵉʳᵐᵃⁿ ᴹᵉˡᵛⁱˡˡᵉ
Rigondeaux
Rigondeaux
Joined: Aug 18, 2014
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August 10th, 2019 at 9:45:10 AM permalink
Quote: lilredrooster



he's charged with a crime and he can't even find out what crime it is he's charged with

he can't find out anything about the status of his case or even when the trial will be



The most amazing part is that he was able to capture this experience so well without ever having married.
lilredrooster
lilredrooster
Joined: May 8, 2015
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Thanks for this post from:
Rigondeaux
August 10th, 2019 at 11:02:22 AM permalink
Quote: Rigondeaux

The most amazing part is that he was able to capture this experience so well without ever having married.




that was funny..............................you might want to think about doing stand up comedy................................. 😃 😃 😃
𝘈 𝘮𝘢𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘬𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘣𝘺 𝘮𝘰𝘶𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘥 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘩𝘦 𝘶𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴.... ᴴᵉʳᵐᵃⁿ ᴹᵉˡᵛⁱˡˡᵉ
TumblingBones
TumblingBones
Joined: Dec 25, 2016
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August 10th, 2019 at 11:06:40 AM permalink
If you are a fan of Aubrey-Maturin books by Patrick O'Brian, you should take a look at "A Book of Voyages" edited by the same author. This is a non-fiction collection of 17th and 18th century travel journals and memoirs edited by O'Brian. The trips range from Lady Crave (1780) traveling in luxury to Constantinople to "The Distresses on the Unfortunate Crew of the Ship Anne and Mary from Norway to Ireland in the Year 1759" in which bad weather forces the sailors to draw straws to see who will eat who.

If you enjoy the Flashman books, check out The Devil Drives: A Life of Sir Richard Burton. This is a bio of the Victorian explorer, soldier, and spy, not to be confused with Elizabeth Taylor's husband. In many ways, Burton was the role model for Harry Flashman. He's also fictionalized as one of the main characters in Philip José Farmer's Riverworld series which I also recommend.

Continuing the theme of (a) travel and (b) eccentric British adventurers, I'll suggest The Places In-between by Rory Stewart. In January 2002 Stewart walked across Afghanistan. This was a few months after the US invasion and things were still very very chaotic. Stewart is an Oxford educated diplomat and former soldier (and possible MI-6 agent) fluent in multiple languages who decided to walk across Asia. This book is about the Afghan part of the walk. gordonm888 mentioned A Walk in the Hindu Kush which covers some of the same terrain in 1956 so the two books might complement each other.

Other non-fiction recommendations are

  • Rocket Boy by Homer Hickam
  • Dreadnaught and Castles of Steel by Peter Massie
  • any book by John McPhee


For fiction, a lot of my favorites have already been mention but I'll add

  • if you like dry humour a'la Catch22 then read Confederacy of Dunces
  • for SF, Lord of Light by Zelazny, Child of Fortune by Norm Spinrad
  • Snow Crash, Diamond Age, and The Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson The 1st 2 are Sci-Fi and the last is historical fiction with a techno twist.
  • Kipling's Kim is one of my all-time favorites that I re-read every couple of years
  • both Perdido Street and The City and the City by China Mieville (not sure how to classify them)
  • if you like mysteries in the flavor of Rex Stout and Agatha Christie, try the Judge Dee books by Robert Van Gulik. These take place in China during the Tang Dynasty (~ 650 CE) and are best when read in order starting with The Chinese Maze Murders. I would skip the Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee which was written in the 18th century and translated by Gulik in 1949


Finally, if short stories are your thing then anything by O'Henry and Isaac Babel. The former is well known but most folks have never heard of Babel, a Russian Jew who was purged and executed by Stalin in 1940. Hemingway considered Babel to be the greatest short story writer in any language. I especially recommend Red Calvary which is based on Babel's experiences in 1920 when he was attached to a Cossack cavalry regiment durring the russian Civil War.
My goal of being well informed conflicts with my goal of remaining sane.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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August 11th, 2019 at 1:24:38 PM permalink
Currently reading:

Master and Commander, Patrick O'Brian

Thunderbolt Kid, Bryson,

Papa Hemingway, Hotchner, (4th time at least)

The Seminary, Paul Hendrickson

Hemingway's Boat, Hendrickson,

Travels Here and There, Bryson,

Medium Raw, Tony Bourdain
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Rigondeaux
Rigondeaux
Joined: Aug 18, 2014
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August 11th, 2019 at 3:09:47 PM permalink
I like Bryson. If you like travel writing, Paul Thereux is really good too. He's a little denser though.

Some Brit friends turned me on to AA Gill. He is not very well known in the U.S. but he is pretty famous over there as a restaurant critic and stuff. He has a couple of really good travel books. Very witty and cutting. He famously feuded with Gordon Ramsay. A good sign since Ramsay is a prick. Though he does make a tasty burger.

Found this excerpt from a restaurant review:

So why do the Americans and English come here? Men who, at home, are finickity and fussy about everything, who consider themselves epicurean and cultured. Men who choose their own ties and are trusted with scissors and corporations, who have ďsophisticatedĒ on their Facebook pages. Why do they continue to come here? They canít all have brain tumors. The only rationally conceivable answer is: Paris. Paris has superpowers; Paris exerts a mercurial force field. This old city has such compelling cultural connotations and aesthetic pheromones, such a nostalgically beguiling cast list, that it defies judgment. Itís a confidence trick that can make oreille de cochon out of a sowís earóreputation and expectation are the MSG of fine dining.

But still, itís undeniable that LíAmi Louis really is special and apart. It has earned an epic accolade. It is, all things considered, entre nous, the worst restaurant in the world.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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August 11th, 2019 at 4:12:45 PM permalink
Anybody ever read any Louis L'Amour? I've
never been able to. 90 novels, sold 200
million copies. They just don't seem very
well written.


"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal

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