EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 28th, 2010 at 8:28:52 PM permalink
Quote: truck72003

15/15. Makes me feel good that all the time and money I spent on Seminary wasn't wasted.



I got one wrong and I don't know which one it was. Maybe it where I said Chuck Heston led the Jews out of Egypt.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Wizard
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Wizard
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September 28th, 2010 at 8:39:29 PM permalink
Now that this is on page 2, I think I can safely ask about question 6.

Quote: Question 6


Which of the following best describes the Catholic teaching about the bread and wine used for Communion?

A) The bread and wine actually become the body and blood of Jesus Christ.
B) The bread and wine are symbols of the body and blood of Jesus Christ.



My gut instinct was to answer A. However, I thought maybe that was just a myth, and changed it to B. However, the correct answer was A. Just goes to show what they said in SAT prep class was right -- you should go with your first instinct.

So, can any Catholics on the board explain this to me? Was (A) really the right answer? Does the bread and wine actually contain the DNA of Jesus after the priest blesses it, or whatever he does. Does any physical change happen to the bread and wine? I will have follow up questions either way.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
teddys
teddys
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September 28th, 2010 at 8:47:31 PM permalink
This survey was covered heavily in the national newspapers. The results showed that Agnostics/Atheists got the highest scores, while Jews and Mormons were next highest.

Make of those results what you will.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 28th, 2010 at 8:53:15 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Now that this is on page 2, I think I can safely ask about question 6.



My gut instinct was to answer A. However, I thought maybe that was just a myth, and changed it to B. However, the correct answer was A. Just goes to show what they said in SAT prep class was right -- you should go with your first instinct.

So, can any Catholics on the board explain this to me? Was (A) really the right answer? Does the bread and wine actually contain the DNA of Jesus after the priest blesses it, or whatever he does. Does any physical change happen to the bread and wine? I will have follow up questions either way.



Yup, thats the one I got wrong. No offense, but do people actually believe this in the modern age? It sounds awfully Pagan to me.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Wizard
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Wizard
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September 28th, 2010 at 9:04:01 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Yup, thats the one I got wrong. No offense, but do people actually believe this in the modern age? It sounds awfully Pagan to me.



Me too. I think I can say that when protestants do communion the bread and wine are just symbolic of the body and blood of Jesus.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Calder
Calder
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September 28th, 2010 at 9:05:11 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, can any Catholics on the board explain this to me?


I'm not Catholic, and make no claim of authority here. I think the Catholic belief of Transubstantiation means that during communion the host and wine are changed to the blood and body of Christ.

I suspect the church makes no DNA claims, and to do so is pointless; this is a matter of faith. I leave it at that, confident that others will fill in condescending comments about the belief of others.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 28th, 2010 at 9:07:32 PM permalink
The bread and wine actually become the body and blood of Jesus Christ.>>>

When does this magical transformation take place? Whenever it is, it would be easy enough to test. We all know the answer, a bunch of people totally ignorant of science thought this would fool people even more ignorant then they were, and they were correct.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Wizard
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Wizard
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September 28th, 2010 at 9:24:12 PM permalink
Quote: Calder

I'm not Catholic, and make no claim of authority here. I think the Catholic belief of Transubstantiation means that during communion the host and wine are changed to the blood and body of Christ.



Hmmm. I suspect that if I went to mass, and pretended to be Catholic at communion time, I would say that the bread tasted like bread to me. If it changed into human flesh, wouldn't it taste like meat? If Catholics believe they are really eating human flesh, doesn't that make them all cannibals?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
mkl654321
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September 28th, 2010 at 9:29:23 PM permalink
I was raised by penguins (if you want to ensure that someone grows up to be an atheist, send them to Catholic school), and I can assure you that that indeed was what they taught--you were eating the actual body and drinking the actual blood of Christ. I can't imagine the pharmacological implications of eating somebody who's been dead for 2000 years.

Oh, well, that's no dumber than believing there's a man in the sky who actually cares whether you eat fish on Friday or not.
The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality.---George Bernard Shaw
Calder
Calder
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September 28th, 2010 at 9:45:29 PM permalink
I'm confident it would taste like bread to you, Mr. Wizard. As I noted, I'm not Catholic, nor do I make any claim of expertise in Catholic doctrine, nor would I expect any adherents on this board. This remains a matter of faith, obviously.

Those who fancy themselves rationalists may want to consider that Galileo, Newton, and Einstein were Christians, or at least in Albert's case, believed in God. You may pooh-pooh the scientific method, but it was (arguably) invented and flourished in the Christian west. One needn't be superstitious to acknowledge that much.

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