Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
Joined: Jan 12, 2010
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October 1st, 2010 at 9:03:22 AM permalink
deleted
DUHHIIIIIIIII HEARD THAT!
Wizard
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Wizard
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October 1st, 2010 at 12:12:51 PM permalink
Quote: mkl654321

Can you support that generalization with evidence?



I second that request.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
odiousgambit
odiousgambit 
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October 1st, 2010 at 12:44:42 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed


This synagogue labels itself Conservative (which means they have more liberal rules than the Orthodox; ... and you should hear what they say about the one Reform temple in the country.



Perhaps you've heard the old joke about the Jewish Robinson Crusoe? One of the things he did while shipwrecked alone on this desert island was build two Temples. So the people who found him asked him about the one he first showed them, and he went on and on about it. Finally they asked him about the other Temple, and he said "that place? I wouldn't go near those people!!"
the next time Dame Fortune toys with your heart, your soul and your wallet, raise your glass and praise her thus: “Thanks for nothing, you cold-hearted, evil, damnable, nefarious, low-life, malicious monster from Hell!” She is, after all, stone deaf. ... Arnold Snyder
Mosca
Mosca
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October 1st, 2010 at 12:52:47 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I second that request.



Here's another request for evidence.
NO KILL I
odiousgambit
odiousgambit 
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October 1st, 2010 at 12:55:56 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed


I've a related question: how do cemeteries get an income? I know they sell plots, but once the body is in the ground and the headstone's up, do they get paid anything else?



This is a problem, the funds from selling the plots is also supposed to provide for maintenance "in Perpetuity". What actually happens is that the cemetery is in a jam once all the plots are sold, the money runs out. The cemetery can start to look pretty seedy unless a church or whatever is taking care of it. Property taxes, of course, cannot be collected; and I don't think anyone has ever tried to make an arrangement for funds with living relatives.
the next time Dame Fortune toys with your heart, your soul and your wallet, raise your glass and praise her thus: “Thanks for nothing, you cold-hearted, evil, damnable, nefarious, low-life, malicious monster from Hell!” She is, after all, stone deaf. ... Arnold Snyder
Wizard
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Wizard
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October 1st, 2010 at 2:36:52 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I've a related question: how do cemeteries get an income? I know they sell plots, but once the body is in the ground and the headstone's up, do they get paid anything else?



That is getting way outside my area, but I once watched a show on Dateline, some similar show, about this. There is indeed a problem with cemeteries filling to capacity, going broke, and then falling into disrepair. What I think usually happens is that if the cemetery is not that old, and in a desirable part of town, the city/county will assume control and keep things maintained. If it is a pauper's cemetery in a bad part of town or rural area, chances are nobody will do anything. With really old cemeteries, when gravestones were usually small and horizontal, sometimes people forget there even is a cemetery. The closing scene of the movie Gangs of New York portrays such a situation. Someone correct me if I'm wrong; again I'm getting really out of my area with this.

Here is a related question for you Nareed. I've noticed driving along rural highways in Mexico that people set up roadside shrines along the side. This isn't just a thing I've seen once or twice, but you can see these things average once a mile or so at times. Why do people do this? Is this the spot where somebody actually died, perhaps in a car accident, or is it just convenient to put these things on the road?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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October 1st, 2010 at 5:03:12 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Here is a related question for you Nareed. I've noticed driving along rural highways in Mexico that people set up roadside shrines along the side. This isn't just a thing I've seen once or twice, but you can see these things average once a mile or so at times. Why do people do this? Is this the spot where somebody actually died, perhaps in a car accident, or is it just convenient to put these things on the road?



I don't know for sure. Yes, there are many of them. I've always assumed, as you did, where people died either in car accidents or by being run over (a lot more likely in poor areas).

I do know Mexican Catholics will set up shrines just about anywhere. I think there are two shrines to the Virgin of Guadalupe for every inhabitant, or at least it feels that way. Have you ever visited a rural church? The shrines they make for saints can be extreme. And the less said about offerings overall the better.

I think Catholic iconic quasi-polytheism fit well with the native's iconic polytheism.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
mkl654321
mkl654321
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October 1st, 2010 at 5:13:44 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I don't know for sure. Yes, there are many of them. I've always assumed, as you did, where people died either in car accidents or by being run over (a lot more likely in poor areas).

I do know Mexican Catholics will set up shrines just about anywhere. I think there are two shrines to the Virgin of Guadalupe for every inhabitant, or at least it feels that way. Have you ever visited a rural church? The shrines they make for saints can be extreme. And the less said about offerings overall the better.

I think Catholic iconic quasi-polytheism fit well with the native's iconic polytheism.



The obsession with images of death also fits in nicely with an earlier, shamanistic religious culture. That's always been one of the strengths of Christianity--it assimilates elements of indigenous religions, thus making itself more palatable to the inhabitants of those religions. Christmas is the Christian version of the Druidic winter solstice festival, for example.

I do wonder why more images of the Virgin Mary haven't been found in tortillas, since so many of them are cooked in Mexico every day. Miracles are rare, I guess.
The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality.---George Bernard Shaw
thecesspit
thecesspit
Joined: Apr 19, 2010
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October 1st, 2010 at 5:39:02 PM permalink
Quote: Mosca

Here's another request for evidence.



Here's a third. I doubt I'll get it though, as it's a flippant comment from mock authority.
"Then you can admire the real gambler, who has neither eaten, slept, thought nor lived, he has so smarted under the scourge of his martingale, so suffered on the rack of his desire for a coup at trente-et-quarante" - Honore de Balzac, 1829
Mosca
Mosca
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October 1st, 2010 at 5:50:15 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard



Here is a related question for you Nareed. I've noticed driving along rural highways in Mexico that people set up roadside shrines along the side. This isn't just a thing I've seen once or twice, but you can see these things average once a mile or so at times. Why do people do this? Is this the spot where somebody actually died, perhaps in a car accident, or is it just convenient to put these things on the road?



This is done here in Pennsylvania; they are placed at the sites of fatal accidents.
NO KILL I

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