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DogHand
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October 1st, 2021 at 6:41:17 PM permalink
Quote: Mosca

Quote: DogHand

In the category 1960's Hits, this song contains the line

It seemed so funny to me

Dog Hand

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    That's "Laugh, Laugh" by The Beau Brummels.
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    Mosca,

    Correct!

    Dog Hand
    Gialmere
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    October 2nd, 2021 at 8:50:45 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Film Themes, name that song...

    This sax heavy theme from a 1963 comedy would end up being played over the opening credits of nine other films.
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    smoothgrh
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    October 2nd, 2021 at 2:36:40 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Film Themes, name that song...

    This sax heavy theme from a 1963 comedy would end up being played over the opening credits of nine other films.

  • link to original post



    This song immediately came to mind, possibly because it's also a favorite among slot machine collectors:

    "The Pink Panther" by Henry Mancini


    But I could be wrong!
    DogHand
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    October 2nd, 2021 at 2:41:14 PM permalink
    Quote: smoothgrh

    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Film Themes, name that song...

    This sax heavy theme from a 1963 comedy would end up being played over the opening credits of nine other films.

  • link to original post



    This song immediately came to mind, possibly because it's also a favorite among slot machine collectors:

    "The Pink Panther" by Henry Mancini


    But I could be wrong!
  • link to original post



    I had the same song in mind.

    Dog Hand
    Gialmere
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    October 2nd, 2021 at 5:14:39 PM permalink
    Quote: smoothgrh

    This song immediately came to mind, possibly because it's also a favorite among slot machine collectors:

    "The Pink Panther" by Henry Mancini


    But I could be wrong!
  • link to original post


    Quote: DogHand

    I had the same song in mind.

    Dog Hand

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    Winner!! Winner!! Felidae Dinner!!

    Yes, of course, the "Pink Panther Theme" by Henry Mancini.



    The version above is the single released in 1963 which became a top ten hit. The theme would then be used for all Pink Panther films except "A Shot in the Dark" and "Inspector Clouseau". While discussing the caper song's creation, Mancini said he talked things over with the film's title sequence animators...


    Quote: Henry Mancini

    I told [the animators] that I would give them a tempo they could animate to, so that any time there were striking motions, someone getting hit, I could score to it.


    Here then is the longer, original title sequence which brings in other of the film's themes and is customized to the animation...

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    Gialmere
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    October 3rd, 2021 at 9:14:48 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Folk Rock, name that song...

    Yeah I'm lookin' for the king of 42nd street
    He drivin' a drop top cadillac
    Last week he took all my money
    And it may sound funny
    But I come to get my money back
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    gordonm888
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    October 3rd, 2021 at 4:56:07 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Folk Rock, name that song...

    Yeah I'm lookin' for the king of 42nd street
    He drivin' a drop top cadillac
    Last week he took all my money
    And it may sound funny
    But I come to get my money back

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    You Don't Mess Around With Jim by Jim Croce
    So many better men, a few of them friends, are dead. And a thousand thousand slimy things live on, and so do I.
    Gialmere
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    October 3rd, 2021 at 10:47:51 PM permalink
    Quote: gordonm888

    You Don't Mess Around With Jim by Jim Croce


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    Yes, the title track of what is (technically) Croce's third album. "You Don't Mess Around with Jim" would become his first released single and the first top ten hit of his brilliant but tragically short career.
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    Gialmere
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    October 5th, 2021 at 1:09:19 PM permalink
    And now, in the category Country Classics, name that song...

    Lonestar belt buckles and old faded Levis
    And each night begins a new day
    If you don't understand him and he don't die young
    He'll probably just ride away
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    Joeman
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    October 5th, 2021 at 1:29:00 PM permalink
    Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow up to be Cowboys
    "Dealer has 'rock'... Pay 'paper!'"
    Gialmere
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    October 5th, 2021 at 4:45:33 PM permalink
    Quote: Joeman

    Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow up to be Cowboys


    Winner! Winner! Longhorn Dinner!!




    Written (along with his wife) and first performed by Ed Bruce, "Mammas Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys" would be voted one of the top 100 country/western songs of all time. The Bruce version reached #15 on the country charts. Note that he would sometimes sing of Budweiser [belt] buckles and faded Wranglers [jeans]. Other times it would be Bud and Levis.



    In 1978 the definitive version of the song would be released by Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson on their duets album. This version would hit #1 on the charts. Note that it also solidified Lonestar (presumably the beer) and Levis as the lyrics.

    Apart from being good, the song sticks around due to its use in modern cowboy movies and TV shows. Most recently it was used as the title song for the Netflix show "The Ranch".
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    Gialmere
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    October 6th, 2021 at 12:17:52 PM permalink
    And now, in the category Disney Tunes, name that song...

    There was Typhoon Tessie, met her on the coast of Java
    When we kissed I bubbled up like molten lava
    Then she gave me the scare of my young life
    Blow me down and pick me up!
    She was the captain's wife
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    mwalz9
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    October 6th, 2021 at 12:43:21 PM permalink
    A Whale of a Tale by Kirk Douglas
    Gialmere
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    October 6th, 2021 at 6:12:29 PM permalink
    Quote: mwalz9

    A Whale of a Tale by Kirk Douglas
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    Winner! Winner! Ika Dinner!!



    Yes, from 1954, "A Whale of a Tale" was the only song featured in the Disney version of "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea". It was performed by Kirk Douglas who seemed pleased by the way it turned out. He not only came up with the guitar toss trick for the scene, he jokingly sent copies of the record to his singer friends like Frank Sinatra warning them of their new competition.

    In addition to appearing on various Disney song records, it would be used as theming music in cue areas of the Disney park's various submarine rides. It also occasionally gets referenced in films or TV shows such as (not surprisingly) Pixar's "Finding Nemo".
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    Gialmere
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    October 12th, 2021 at 11:01:37 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Rhythm & Blues, name that song...

    Fine little girl waits for me
    Catch a ship across the sea
    Sail that ship about, all alone
    Never know if I make it home
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Joeman
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    October 12th, 2021 at 11:51:23 AM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Rhythm & Blues, name that song...

    Fine little girl waits for me
    Catch a ship across the sea
    Sail that ship about, all alone
    Never know if I make it home

    link to original post



    then those are the "lyrics" to Louie Louie, but good luck deciphering them from listening! The only reason I know the lyrics is because they were featured in a Bloom County comic strip regarding the 1988 presidential election. As you see, the last frame shows what you (and Bill) actually hear:

    "Dealer has 'rock'... Pay 'paper!'"
    Gialmere
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    October 12th, 2021 at 3:29:13 PM permalink
    Quote: Joeman

    then those are the "lyrics" to Louie Louie, but good luck deciphering them from listening! The only reason I know the lyrics is because they were featured in a Bloom County comic strip regarding the 1988 presidential election. As you see, the last frame shows what you (and Bill) actually hear:


    Winner! Winner! Frat House Dinner!!



    Some songs just seem to tap into the human psyche. For some strange reason they make you feel good, make you want to get up and move. This isn't to say, however, that they're immediate hits. Case in point: "Louie Louie".

    "Louie Louie" was written by Richard Berry in 1955. He would record it in 1957. The song went nowhere. In 1961, the song was covered by Rockin' Robin Roberts. It also went nowhere. Why would it? The song is about something only Harry Belafonte could probably get away with. It sings of a Jamaican sailor trying to get home to see the girl he loves.

    If that description of what the song is about is news to you, you're probably only familiar with the most famous version of the tune. In 1963, the song was covered by the Kingsmen...



    The Kingsman were a nobody band when they recorded it. The main engineer at the recording studio had already left for the day locking the vocal mic boom in the up position. So the group's (rather short) singer (who also wore braces at the time) had to shout upwards attempting to be heard. The result was a muddled, incomprehensible vocal.

    It was a smash hit. First breaking out in the northwest and then slowly spreading across the country. No doubt the muddled vocals helped. Rumors that the song contained obscene lyrics quickly spread. This resulted in the FBI actually investigating the song to see what smut those rock and/or rollers were peddling to America's youth. After 31 months, the G-men concluded the lyrics were unintelligible. (Why they didn't simply listen to the original Richard Berry version where the lyrics are crystal clear is unknown.)

    "Louie Louie" would gain new popularity, and become a college party staple, with its inclusion in the 1978 film "Animal House"...(Sorry, Spanish clip)



    The song would become one of, if not THE most covered rock song of all time with some estimates of over 2,000 versions with performances by such notable artists as: Paul Revere & the Raiders, The Beach Boys, Otis Redding, The Kinks, Frank Zappa, Jim Morrison (live), Pink Floyd (live), The Beatles (Get Back/Let it Be sessions), Jefferson Airplane and Grateful Dead (live), Iggy Pop, Motörhead, Bruce Springsteen, Allman Brothers Band (live), The Clash, Blondie, The Bangles, Neil Diamond (live), Lisa Simpson (Simpson's episode), The Smashing Pumpkins, Billy Joel et al.

    Multiple record albums containing nothing but cover versions of the song have been released (and re-released). Entire festivals and parades are put on annually in the song's honor. Richard Berry was no doubt proud that he wrote a song that touched so many people, and you'd think he got very rich on that one song's royalties. Unfortunately, he sold the publishing rights to "Louie Louie" for $750 back in 1959.
    Last edited by: Gialmere on Oct 12, 2021
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 18th, 2021 at 11:10:16 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time, name that song...


    I'm a rolling thunder, pouring rain
    I'm coming on like a hurricane
    My lightning's flashing across the sky
    You're only young, but you're gonna die
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    scolist
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    October 18th, 2021 at 11:55:19 AM permalink
    AC/DC's Hell's Bells
    There's no way out of here When you come in You're in for good There was no promise made The part you played The chance...........you took
    Gialmere
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    October 18th, 2021 at 5:02:11 PM permalink
    Quote: scolist

    AC/DC's Hell's Bells


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    Could AC/DC continue after the death of lead singer Bon Scott? With the release of their "Back in Black" album in 1980, the answer was a resounding yes. It would go on to be considered one of the greatest rock albums of all time. "Hells Bells" is the first track on side one, setting the tone for the work. It was also the second single released. In addition to films, the song is often heard at sporting events where the tolling of the funeral bell along with the opening guitar riff are used to give things an ominous ambiance.

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    Gialmere
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    October 19th, 2021 at 11:16:55 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time, name that song...


    When I look out my window
    What do you think I see
    And when I look in my window
    So many different people to be
    It's strange
    Sure is strange
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 19th, 2021 at 5:47:44 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time, name that song...


    When I look out my window
    What do you think I see
    And when I look in my window
    So many different people to be
    It's strange
    Sure is strange


    It's a toughie...


    You've got to pick up every stitch
    You've got to pick up every stitch
    The rabbits runnin' in the ditch
    Oh no, must be the...
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    scolist
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    October 19th, 2021 at 6:07:03 PM permalink
    Season Of The Witch-Donovan
    There's no way out of here When you come in You're in for good There was no promise made The part you played The chance...........you took
    Gialmere
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    October 19th, 2021 at 6:28:51 PM permalink
    Quote: scolist

    Season Of The Witch-Donovan


    Winner! Winner! Mushroom Dinner!!


    Yes, Donovan's "Season of the Witch" from the early days of psychedelic rock. Although the song is an obvious metaphor for consuming hallucinogenic drugs, the swirling, creepy paranoia it creates does indeed make it a pretty good Halloween song for hippies and all those who follow their recreational path.

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    Gialmere
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    October 20th, 2021 at 11:30:17 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time, name that song...


    Composed by Charles Gounod in 1872, this short, creepy and oddly titled classical music piece was selected by director Alfred Hitchcock as one of a handful of tunes he'd like to be stranded on a desert island with.
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    October 20th, 2021 at 11:09:59 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time, name that song...


    Composed by Charles Gounod in 1872, this short, creepy and oddly titled classical music piece was selected by director Alfred Hitchcock as one of a handful of tunes he'd like to be stranded on a desert island with.


    BUZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!!!

    Oooh, sorry. Another toughie...

    "Funeral March of a Marionette" is one of those tunes that most people have heard but few know the name of. Gounod first wrote it for the piano but orchestrated it seven years later in what would become the "standard" version.

    A young Hitchcock first heard the march in the 1927 film "Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans". 25 years later, he remembered the effect of creepy humor it had on him and chose it to be the theme music of his TV show.

    Although the short video below doesn't exactly follow the music's story notes. It's a good example of what's going on...

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    Joeman
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    October 21st, 2021 at 4:58:01 AM permalink
    Count me amongst those who are familiar with the tune, but never knew its name.

    As an aside, this was also used as intro music for the 80's video game Shamus, originally written for the Atari 800. Growing up, we had that game on cassette tape -- at the time, we couldn't afford a disk drive! It took about 5 minutes to load.
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    Gialmere
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    October 21st, 2021 at 11:43:13 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#4), name that song...


    Ooh ee ooh ah ah ting tang walla walla bing bang
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    MrV
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    October 21st, 2021 at 11:44:17 AM permalink
    It had something to do with "witch doctor."
    "What, me worry?"
    Gialmere
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    October 21st, 2021 at 5:32:58 PM permalink
    Quote: MrV

    It had something to do with "witch doctor."
    link to original post


    Winner! Winner! Chipmunk Dinner!!

    "Witch Doctor" was David "Dave" Seville's (aka Ross Bagdasarian) first hit record. Believe it or not, this gimmicky, 1958 song spent three weeks at #1 on the Billboard Top 100. Using his home tape recorder, Seville figured out a way to double the speed of his voice allowing him to accompany himself with funny, high-pitched singing. Later, of course, in the same year, he would hit the jackpot using the technique by creating Alvin and the Chipmunks and releasing the "band's" smash-hit Christmas record.

    Although not officially a Chipmunk song, "Witch Doctor" was later covered by the group (complete with an in-joke reference to the original recording) and is closely associated with them. These days the song is typically heard at children's Halloween parties.

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    Gialmere
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    October 22nd, 2021 at 10:53:30 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#5), name that song...


    I am the clown with the tear-away face,
    Here in a flash and gone without a trace
    I am the who when you call "Who's there?",
    I am the wind blowing through your hair
    I am the shadow on the moon at night,
    Filling your dreams to the brim with fright
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 22nd, 2021 at 5:14:26 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (Heard at Halloween Time[#5), name that song...


    I am the clown with the tear-away face,
    Here in a flash and gone without a trace
    I am the who when you call "Who's there?",
    I am the wind blowing through your hair
    I am the shadow on the moon at night,
    Filling your dreams to the brim with fright


    No solves eh? I thought some fan would get this one quick.

    In this town we call home
    Everyone hail to the pumpkin song
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 23rd, 2021 at 1:18:51 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (Heard at Halloween Time[#5), name that song...


    I am the clown with the tear-away face,
    Here in a flash and gone without a trace
    I am the who when you call "Who's there?",
    I am the wind blowing through your hair
    I am the shadow on the moon at night,
    Filling your dreams to the brim with fright


    No solves eh? I thought some fan would get this one quick.

    In this town we call home
    Everyone hail to the pumpkin song


    Buzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!

    A surprise toughie.

    Most Christmas songs you hear are about Christmas. They sing of the Nativity, or Santa Claus, or Christmastime in general. The smallest category of Christmas songs includes tunes (like "Let it Snow" or "Baby it's Cold Outside") that have nothing to do with the holiday but are simply associated with it.

    In contrast, most of the songs you hear at Halloween have nothing to do with Halloween. Like "Hell's Bells", "Season of the Witch" and "Witch Doctor", they merely sound spooky or have a spooky title. "This is Halloween", by Danny Elfman is an exception that smears Halloween all over your face. It's the first song in Tim Burton's "The Nightmare Before Christmas", a film that Disney was so uncertain about that they released under their Touchstone brand. Nowadays, the company is more than happy to slap a picture of Jack Skellington on any product they can think up and sell.

    If the song has a flaw, it's that it isn't commercial. It's very wordy. This makes sense in that it was written to introduce the audience to Halloween Town where most of the action in the film takes place. But, it also means that, unlike a standard Disney or Christmas song, people aren't going to spontaneously start singing it.

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    Gialmere
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    October 23rd, 2021 at 3:41:53 PM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#6), name that song...


    I got my best suit and my tie
    Shiny silver dollar on either eye
    I hear the chauffeur comin' to my door
    Says there's room for maybe just one more

    I was struck by lighting, walkin' down the street
    I was hit by something last night in my sleep

    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 24th, 2021 at 12:39:59 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#6), name that song...


    I got my best suit and my tie
    Shiny silver dollar on either eye
    I hear the chauffeur comin' to my door
    Says there's room for maybe just one more

    I was struck by lighting, walkin' down the street
    I was hit by something last night in my sleep


    BUZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!!

    Speaking of Danny Elfman, perhaps Tim Burton and Disney selected him to write the music for "The Nightmare Before Christmas" because he had previous experience. He had already written "Dead Man's Party" which became a huge hit song for his band Oingo Boingo. It's a tune that you're pretty much guaranteed to hear at any Halloween gathering.

    The song has appeared in many films and TV shows (most notably in the 1986 film "Back to School" with Rodney Dangerfield) and even became the encore tune for Elfman's Nightmare Before Christmas concerts. The verse above mentioning "room for maybe just one more" is a reference to the short story "The Bus-Conductor" which also inspired the Twilight Zone episode "Twenty Two."


    ----------------------------------------------------------

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#7), name that song...


    Hope you got your things together
    Hope you are quite prepared to die
    Looks like we're in for nasty weather
    One eye is taken for an eye

    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Dieter
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    October 24th, 2021 at 12:58:30 PM permalink
    Bad Moon Rising, CCR
    May the cards fall in your favor.
    scolist
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    October 24th, 2021 at 1:29:13 PM permalink
    I think...
    Eye Of The Zombie-John Fogerty solo work
    There's no way out of here When you come in You're in for good There was no promise made The part you played The chance...........you took
    Gialmere
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    October 24th, 2021 at 2:55:01 PM permalink
    Quote: Dieter

    Bad Moon Rising, CCR


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    Reaching #2 in America and #1 in the UK, 1969's "Bad Moon Rising" was reportedly written by John Fogerty after watching "The Devil and Daniel Webster". Inspired by a scene in the film involving a hurricane, Fogerty claims the song is about "the apocalypse that was going to be visited upon us".

    The CCR song appears in many movies and TV shows, usually with plots involving werewolves.

    Last edited by: Gialmere on Oct 24, 2021
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Dieter
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    October 24th, 2021 at 3:02:04 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    Quote: Dieter

    Bad Moon Rising, CCR


    Winner! Winner! Lycanthrope Dinner!!
    link to original post



    Finally!

    I probably won't have another guess for 19 weeks.
    May the cards fall in your favor.
    Gialmere
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    October 25th, 2021 at 12:02:36 PM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#8), name that song...


    Love of two is one
    Here but now they're gone
    Came the last night of sadness
    And it was clear she couldn't go on
    Then the door was open and the wind appeared
    The candles blew and then disappeared
    The curtains flew and then he appeared
    Saying don't be afraid
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 25th, 2021 at 4:28:51 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#8), name that song...


    Love of two is one
    Here but now they're gone
    Came the last night of sadness
    And it was clear she couldn't go on
    Then the door was open and the wind appeared
    The candles blew and then disappeared
    The curtains flew and then he appeared
    Saying don't be afraid


    I guarantee you've heard this one.

    One of the words in the title is "Fear".
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    scolist
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    October 25th, 2021 at 5:40:31 PM permalink
    Don't Fear The Reaper-Blue Oyster Cult
    There's no way out of here When you come in You're in for good There was no promise made The part you played The chance...........you took
    Gialmere
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    October 25th, 2021 at 6:44:53 PM permalink
    Quote: scolist

    Don't Fear The Reaper-Blue Oyster Cult


    Winner! Winner! Skeletal Dinner!!



    There have been many interpretations of "(Don't Fear) The Reaper" over the years. Some consider it a haunting ghost story. Others consider it to be about a suicide pact. The writer and singer, Blue Öyster Cult lead guitarist Donald "Buck Dharma" Roeser, considers it a song about eternal love and the inevitability of death. He's appalled by the suicide theory (no doubt coming from the lyric's mention of Romeo and Juliet), but does like the haunting views.

    The song has appeared in some horror films. Most notably in the first, TV mini-series version of Stephen King's "The Stand". It's played over the opening scenes as the virus wipes out 99.4% of the world's population. And, of course, you can't mention the song without someone bringing up the famous SNL cowbell sketch...



    Dharma says he loved the sketch but is glad it's fading and letting the song have its creepy vibe back.
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 26th, 2021 at 11:25:42 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#9), name that song...

    Considered to be the most famous organ work in existence, this nine(ish) minute piece attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach is usually associated with the horror genre.
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    ThatDonGuy
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    October 26th, 2021 at 12:24:13 PM permalink

    Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, probably better known as "the theme from Rollerball"

    Gialmere
    Gialmere
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    October 26th, 2021 at 6:06:59 PM permalink
    Quote: ThatDonGuy


    Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, probably better known as "the theme from Rollerball"


    Winner! Winner! Bach Bach Dinner!!!


    The "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor" is one of music's great mysteries. Nobody can seem to agree on anything about it. Was it written by Bach? There's certainly evidence that it was, but many music historians say no. When was it written? Some say as early as 1704, some say as late as 1750, still others say anywhere in between. Some say it's too simplistic to be the work of Bach, others say it's such a complex masterpiece that it can only be the work of Bach. Some say it's program music depicting a storm, while Disney's "Fantasia" declares it to be absolute music depicting nothing and simply existing for its own sake.

    What the hell is it?

    Despite all the confusion from the music experts, Hollywood immediately saw what it was: very scary (and free) music. It put the tune to work with alacrity, using it so often that it has become a cliché to illustrate horror and villainy. It has appeard in films like "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" (1931), "The Black Cat" (1934), "Fantasia" (1940), Sunset Boulevard (1950), "The Great Race" (1965), "Tales From the Crypt" (1972), "Rollerball" (1975) et al, not to mention appearances on TV and in video games. After "Fantasia", Disney used it again in "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" (1954) to depict Captain Nemo's growing madness. (In a bit of horror synchronicity, the organ James Mason was shown playing eventually ended up in the ballroom of the Haunted Mansion ride at Disneyland where a ghostly organist plays ghostly waltzes on it for ghostly dancers.)

    Although the pipe organ is the definitive instrument for "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor", it has many versions. The orchestrated version is best illustrated by "Fantasia"...



    Here's an interesting interpretation on the harp...



    Of course, neoclassical metal guitarists love Bach...

    Last edited by: Gialmere on Oct 26, 2021
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 27th, 2021 at 11:43:58 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#10), name that song...

    And although I know it's strictly taboo
    When you arouse the need in me
    My heart says yes indeed in me
    Proceed with what you're leading me to
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
    Gialmere
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    October 27th, 2021 at 4:52:51 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#10), name that song...

    And although I know it's strictly taboo
    When you arouse the need in me
    My heart says yes indeed in me
    Proceed with what you're leading me to


    You're probably more familiar with the opening lines...

    Those fingers in my hair
    That sly come hither stare
    That strips my conscience bare
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
    Gialmere
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    October 27th, 2021 at 11:18:06 PM permalink
    Quote: Gialmere

    Quote: Gialmere

    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#10), name that song...

    And although I know it's strictly taboo
    When you arouse the need in me
    My heart says yes indeed in me
    Proceed with what you're leading me to


    You're probably more familiar with the opening lines...

    Those fingers in my hair
    That sly come hither stare
    That strips my conscience bare


    BUZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!!



    While many songs have used the concept of magic as a metaphor for romantic seduction, the all time champ would have to be 1957's "Witchcraft" sung by Frank Sinatra.

    "Witchcraft" is another tune linked to Halloween merely by its title. You'll usually hear it at parties for the older crowd, but younger artists continue to record and cover it. The song has also appeared in many films and TV shows. Just as "Bad Moon Rising" is used for movies with werewolves, "Witchcraft" is used for romantic scenes in movies featuring (surprise!) witches. This has been especially true in the last few decades as witch roles are now typically played by young, pretty actresses. (I guess the ugly old crone at the cauldron is just too 17th century.)
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
    Gialmere
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    October 28th, 2021 at 11:43:00 AM permalink
    And now, in the category Heard at Halloween Time (#11), name that song...

    Thirteen month old baby
    Broke the lookin' glass
    Seven years of bad luck
    The good things in your past

    When you believe in things
    That you don't understand
    Then you suffer
    Have you tried 22 tonight? I said 22.
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