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Wizard
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Wizard
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December 25th, 2012 at 8:40:56 PM permalink
I recently watched Six Degrees of Separation. One thing said in that movie was that, in genreal, wine is better in even-numbered years. Is this true? Is there something in the climate that causes wine to best better every other year? I was just singing the praises of an odd-number year wine in the Merry Christmas thread, but maybe it is even better in the even-numbered years.

The question for the poll is which is better, the even- or odd-numbered years? I would also be very interested in an explanation for those who have an educated answer (calling Paco).
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
FleaStiff
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December 25th, 2012 at 10:48:38 PM permalink
Depends entirely on who is paying for all the taste testing.

Ofcourse prize winning wine often means a Reserve and that implies a sufficiently large yield to have been held off the market for a commercially rewarding "win", yet many winemakers simply ship their best wine out as gifts.
boymimbo
boymimbo
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December 25th, 2012 at 10:58:35 PM permalink
The year doesn't matter. It really depends on the weather and growing conditions of the season in the region the grapes were grown. A longer, warmer growing season makes for very fruity grapes which then turns into fantastic wines as the vintner has much more artistry available in making a good wine. Years when the summer is too hot makes for dry grapes with not alot a flavour, and growing seasons cut short have less than average vintages as well as the grapes don't get a chance to mature.

Late frosts generally are not good for grapes either, as is neither too much rain.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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December 25th, 2012 at 11:11:47 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I recently watched Six Degrees of Separation. One thing said in that movie was that, in general, wine is better in even-numbered years.





David Hampton was a pathological, but charming fraud who persuaded a number of famous people to lend him money, put him up for the night with his with and insider knowledge and supposedly fine taste in wine and food.

The "even numbered years" is a bit of folk legend that his character quotes that the author used to show how persuasive David was in conversation. The "even numbered years" is not based on anything real.

David Hampton was still alive when the play opened at Lincoln Center. He gave interviews to the press, gate-crashed a producers party, and began a campaign of harassment against Guare, the author of the play. The harassment included phone calls and death threats, prompting Guare to apply for a restraining order in April 1991, which was unsuccessful. In the fall of 1991, Hampton filed a $100 million lawsuit, claiming that the play had stolen the copyright on his persona and his story. His lawsuit was eventually dismissed.

David Hampton died at age 39 IN 2003 of AIDS after sleeping with male prostitutes.
Wizard
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Wizard
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December 26th, 2012 at 4:15:12 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

David Hampton was a pathological, but charming fraud who persuaded a number of famous people to lend him money, put him up for the night with his with and insider knowledge and supposedly fine taste in wine and food. The "even numbered years" is a bit of folk legend that his character quotes that the author used to show how persuasive David was in conversation. The "even numbered years" is not based on anything real.



I guess he had me fooled too, as the character in the movie, played very well by Will Smith, came off as very convincing.

I've read those who saw the play thought the movie didn't do it justice. However, having nothing to compare it to, I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. My biggest complaint is it ends too soon, just as the story gets really interesting. Also, maybe it is more clear in the play, but the title has almost nothing to do with the movie.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
teddys
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December 29th, 2012 at 4:24:15 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I guess he had me fooled too, as the character in the movie, played very well by Will Smith, came off as very convincing.

I've read those who saw the play thought the movie didn't do it justice. However, having nothing to compare it to, I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. My biggest complaint is it ends too soon, just as the story gets really interesting. Also, maybe it is more clear in the play, but the title has almost nothing to do with the movie.

I've read the play and seen the movie, and I love them both. One of my all-time favorite works. Stockard Channing originated the female lead in the Broadway production, and reprised it in the movie. Of course, it was Will Smith's first "serious" role while Fresh Prince of Bel Air was winding down.

I agree the wine anecdote was just a part of his overall con. Just like the spiel he gives about South Africa and "Cats" the movie (!) -- stuff that appeals to the upper class while not having any real truth or substance. Six Degrees of Separation (the sociological concept) is mentioned briefly by Stockard Channing near the end of the film.

Also, its a BOT-tle of wine!
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
JohnnyQ
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December 30th, 2012 at 6:29:26 AM permalink
Well I will add my 2 cents to say that I like Red better than white !
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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January 1st, 2013 at 3:04:09 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I've read those who saw the play thought the movie didn't do it justice. However, having nothing to compare it to, I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. My biggest complaint is it ends too soon, just as the story gets really interesting. Also, maybe it is more clear in the play, but the title has almost nothing to do with the movie.



A number of playwrights explore the idea that we are deeply enmeshed in each other's lives. The intimacy of the theater is more of a proper venue to explore that idea. Movies and television are more voyeuristic, and the idea is sometimes lost in the conversion.

I don't know if you saw Closer which was also a play. The playwright set up a very complicated relationship where all the characters effect each other's life starting at a time before the play begins. It's an idea that is almost completely lost in the movie. As a play it was often hysterical. I don't think that anyone laughed once at the movie. I suspect that no one had any idea why the movie was called "Closer", unless they had seen the play.

Another play was Amadeus which had a similar emotional impact. A great deal of the play was Antonio Salieri addressing the audience directly. You identify with his character. Salieri and the audience in the play feel the mutual strain of knowing that no matter how hard we work, or study, or plot, we will always be blown out of the water by native genius who can create incredible works seemingly without effort. You share his feeling of frustration. The major theme of the play is completely lost in the movie. The movie was excellent, but the most important part of the play is gone.

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