discflicker
discflicker
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smoothgrh
June 7th, 2018 at 7:48:45 AM permalink
Quote: PokerGrinder

Iíve driven through the Canadian Rockies and the American Rockies. I drove through Colorado trying to outrun a massive blizzard. I managed to only go off the road once lol with no damage I might add. Iíve had plenty of snowy mountain driving especially when in Wyoming. Wyoming is the worst!



Driving I-80 West through a Wyoming blizzard once, the snow drifted over the road markers... imagine driving down a mountain and realizing that you have no idea where the road is!! I just followed a semi.

I-80 is really beautiful from Reno to Utah... you should have no worries about snow. Look at the map... it's at the top of a dozen or so N/S mountain ridges, but you're not going over the highest parts and you miss most of 'em. You start by driving down the Truckee River valley, zip across the 40-mile desert, and then cruise along The Humboldt River valley, taking the same route the 'ol 49-ers took. The geology is fascinating and there are lots of interesting stops along the way. There are casinos in every little town along the way, and especially when you hit Wendover at the Utah boarder. The road is very well marked and busy, so don't worry about being lost in desolation. If you get a CB radio you can hear the truckers jammin' about the road conditions. I have never used chains and have taken that route at least 6 times, no problem.

Wyoming was another story... my trans-axle broke in the frozen Wind-River range, and I had to spend 13 days stuck in the Winner's Casino in Winnemucca waiting for repairs. But that was back when the had a quarter craps table, and I played it the whole time with a dealer named Doug.
The difference between zero and the smallest possible number? It doesn't matter; once you cross that edge, it might as well be the difference between zero and 1. The difference between infinity and reality? They are mutually exclusive.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
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June 7th, 2018 at 8:22:16 AM permalink
I used to have to deal with the Snoqualamie Pass just east of Seattle. Not much of climb but there were warning signs and micro radio stations. When it was a snow storm there would be a "chain up" area for vehicles that carried them to put them on and often there would be two or three guys out there doing if for you for five dollars. The rule was firmly enforced, if you didn't get chains on by some designated "X", you took the next exit and found a bar/restaurant/motel/truckstop/whatever.

I'd second the comment about 'no junkers'. People who live in those areas know how vehicles can get stranded. People who are merely driving thru those areas can wind up learning. Water, blankets, food, signaling equipment and more water.
beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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June 7th, 2018 at 8:44:20 AM permalink
Quote: FleaStiff

I used to have to deal with the Snoqualamie Pass just east of Seattle. Not much of climb but there were warning signs and micro radio stations. When it was a snow storm there would be a "chain up" area for vehicles that carried them to put them on and often there would be two or three guys out there doing if for you for five dollars. The rule was firmly enforced, if you didn't get chains on by some designated "X", you took the next exit and found a bar/restaurant/motel/truckstop/whatever.

I'd second the comment about 'no junkers'. People who live in those areas know how vehicles can get stranded. People who are merely driving thru those areas can wind up learning. Water, blankets, food, signaling equipment and more water.



Exactly. It was not optional. You used them, or you got turned back.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
Wizard
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Wizard
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June 7th, 2018 at 9:19:32 AM permalink
The road going up to Brian Head almost always has a "chains required" sign during ski season, but almost nobody puts them on. I've done that road lots of times in ski season without chains and nothing happened, although was a little nervous. I wish the department of transportation would say "recommended" when it was worth considering and saved "required" only when they really meant it.

Also, what exactly are "snow tires." The Lee Canyon road, up to Ski Las Vegas will often have a sign that says "chains or snow tires required." My mini SUV has some manly looking tires on it but I don't know if they count as "snow tires." I've never once heard someone say, "It's winter -- time to put the snow tires back on my car."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Ibeatyouraces
Ibeatyouraces
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June 7th, 2018 at 9:26:49 AM permalink
Different tread types on the tires for various conditions.
DUHHIIIIIIIII HEARD THAT!
beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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June 7th, 2018 at 10:38:50 AM permalink
In the Great White North, snow tires USED to specifically mean steel studs embedded in the tread, slightly protruding. They damage the hell out of roads, so they were only allowed during certain months.

I'm guessing you can't even buy those any more, but I left the North in 1993.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
petroglyph
petroglyph
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June 7th, 2018 at 11:43:54 AM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

I'm guessing you can't even buy those any more, but I left the North in 1993.

Of course you can buy them. You can even have studs added if you desire more grab, or have lost to many. Never pull out the short ones.
billryan
billryan
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June 7th, 2018 at 11:53:52 AM permalink
In NY, it was pretty common to switch out your back tires for snow tires in December back in the 70s. Even as late as the late 1980s, a lot of rear wheel drive vehicles would switch. At some point, it seems advances in tires and the switch to front wheel drive pretty much eliminated the need for them in the down state area. Not sure what they do further north in the mountains.
The difference between fiction and reality is that fiction is supposed to make sense.
smoothgrh
smoothgrh
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June 7th, 2018 at 12:58:15 PM permalink
Thanks for the responses, everyone!

The drive along Highway 80 is more mountainous than I realized, especially on the far west and east sides, it appears. I did a quick scan of Google Earth after everyone started talking about snow!

The train idea is also a good optionóthanks for checking that. I might pitch that plan! I do want to check out West Wendover, howeveróI got an offer years ago from the Peppermill for something really cheap, like $189 for round-trip flight and a three-night stay. Let me try to verify that.

I'm also thinking that if we do the drive, we could just stop at all the small towns. Our road trips usually have stops at only the major areas, but I think this kind of trip would be worthy of more exploration. Plus, we'd be in no hurry to get there, so that helps!
Last edited by: smoothgrh on Jun 7, 2018

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