rxwine
rxwine
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August 27th, 2010 at 5:09:13 AM permalink
Is "Alien" a chick flick or guy flick? At the moment the only name I remember from the movie is Sigourney Weaver's without looking it up.
Quasimodo? Does that name ring a bell?
Nareed
Nareed
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August 27th, 2010 at 6:49:02 AM permalink
Quote: rxwine

Is "Alien" a chick flick or guy flick? At the moment the only name I remember from the movie is Sigourney Weaver's without looking it up.



Alien's a horror movie.

Regarding "Pulp Fiction," can someone explain why they like that piece of, well, whatever it is. Is it the non-stop filthy dialogue? The violence? The lack of a discernible plot?
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teddys
teddys
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August 27th, 2010 at 7:16:18 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Regarding "Pulp Fiction," can someone explain why they like that piece of, well, whatever it is. Is it the non-stop filthy dialogue? The violence? The lack of a discernible plot?

Yes ... and no. You bring up those things as negatives, but they are actually what makes the movie great. Tarantino is often thought of as a "post-modern" film director; that is, he grew up in a video store watching VHS movies and copying from all sorts of sources: B movies, kung-fu, gangster films, etc. Pulp Fiction is a pastiche of stuff that has come before; the title itself suggests low-grade, cheap, lurid magazine stories from the 40s and 50s. Tarantino always puts a lot of violence and bad language in his films; what is great about Pulp Fiction is that it works because the characters are unforgettable and the dialogue is great and catchy. (Somebody just quoted a line from it to me on another thread.) The plot is non-linear which is another cool thing about it.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
Nareed
Nareed
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August 27th, 2010 at 7:35:18 AM permalink
Quote: teddys

Yes ... and no. You bring up those things as negatives, but they are actually what makes the movie great.



I brought them up as descriptive. But they are negatives.

Take the language. The value of profanity lies in shock. Using it now and then is like throwing a bucket of cold water into someone's face. Using it all the time, it's like throwing bucket after bucket of water at a fish. That's also the big dialogue flaw in Tom Clancy's novels, BTW. Violence works ins a similar fashion.

Quote:

[..]what is great about Pulp Fiction is that it works because the characters are unforgettable and the dialogue is great and catchy.



I suppose there may be a different version from the one I saw, one with catchy dialogue.

The only line I remotely remember is when Uma Thurman asks John Travolta whether he meant it when he said it's reasonable for her boyfirend to have thrown a man out of a window for a minor offense.

Quote:

The plot is non-linear which is another cool thing about it.



Non-linear plots can be great. Asimov used one in "The End of Eternity," which greatly complicated the complications inherent in time travel. He tried something similar in "The Gods Themselves," but didn't do quite as well.

But before it is non-linear it has to be a plot. I concede "Pulp Fiction" is non-linear.

I'll tell you what that movie did for me. It made me place a big sign with red letters on it in my mind which says "Watch nothing by Tarantino." I keep it next to the one that says "Don't ever play Keno."

I've mostly kept to that. Unfortunately the man directed a season finale ep of the original CSI. I won't say it was the worst CSI episode I ever saw, but it was pretty bad.

Hmm. Mulling over Nareed's Revised Laws of Hollywood. 1) Watch nothing by Tarantino. 2) During development: whatever happens, nothing happens. Just twenty three more...
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boymimbo
boymimbo
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August 27th, 2010 at 7:43:12 AM permalink
How can you not love Pulp Fiction?

In my opinion, the plot of the movie is quite ingenious as it starts towards the end of the movie. You've got Travolta, and this is his comeback movie -- he signed on at reportedly about $140,000 to do the film. Samuel L. Jackson is his black partner. You don't know what they are up to at the beginning of the movie and you are completely surprised to see them in the very dark role that they are in.

It is absolutely funny, has got a great soundtrack, and is completely out-of-the-box wild. The scene where Travolta and Jackson shoots the head off their informant and goes to Tarantino's house is absolutely fantastic.

Bruce Willis is a boxer who, while on the run from Marcellus, gets into a completely unbelievable situation, and ends up in a absolutely crazy role way outside of his usual stuff.

The movie is independent meaning that a major studio did not underwrite the film. The budget for the movie was $8 million.

The movie is over the top in its violence, bad language, and theme. Hence the name of the movie. But somehow Tarantino created film-making magic.
----- You want the truth! You can't handle the truth!
Nareed
Nareed
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August 27th, 2010 at 8:19:03 AM permalink
Quote: boymimbo

How can you not love Pulp Fiction?



I've stated my reasons above.

Quote:

In my opinion, the plot of the movie is quite ingenious as it starts towards the end of the movie.



What's the plot?

A plot can be described in a sentence or at most a short paragraph. For example, the plot of "The Fugitive" is: a man framed for murder runs from the law while trying to prove his innocence.
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boymimbo
boymimbo
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August 27th, 2010 at 8:26:51 AM permalink
Great movies and TV shows can have several story lines or plots. For Pulp fiction, there are several plots revolving around the few characters, revolving around Marcellus Wallace's evil empire.
----- You want the truth! You can't handle the truth!
Nareed
Nareed
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August 27th, 2010 at 8:46:21 AM permalink
Quote: boymimbo

Great movies and TV shows can have several story lines or plots. For Pulp fiction, there are several plots revolving around the few characters, revolving around Marcellus Wallace's evil empire.



Very well, then. Use up all the board's memory if you want: what's the plot?
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Wizard
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Wizard
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August 27th, 2010 at 9:26:34 AM permalink
If I were to cull a list of my 10 favorites movies Pulp Fiction would definitely be on it.

Regarding the profanity, it depends on the context of it. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe Raging Bull was rated the best movie of the eighties by both Siskel and Ebert, and it was chock full of the F word. In some situations the movie would seem unrealistic without it. Scarface is another movie where the profanity just doesn't seem like profanity, it is just natural for the character. One thing I respect about Pulp Fiction was the courage to have white characters use the N word. Obviously, I still don't.

Regarding the plot and non-linear narrative, I don't think anybody will argue that the plot is what carries Pulp Fiction. It is the texture and dialogue. It is the kind of movie that I could come close to reciting the dialogue word for word as I'm watching it. Much like real life, what happens is much the result of accidents and coincidences. For example, just about every use of a gun is accidental, or the shooter misses his target, much like real life. The non-linear story line I think was to de-emphasize the plot, and make it a challenge for the audience to see how all the characters and events were related.

Regarding the violence, I'm comfortable with the level in Pulp Fiction. However, Reservoir Dogs was too heavy for me. I have trouble watching that one. If just the ear scene could be removed, then I could take it. What helps me take it with Pulp Fiction is the violence is kind of cartoony, much like both Kill Bill movies. I think the reason that blood would spray out of people in the Kill Bills was that is how it is drawn in comic books. Correct me if I'm wrong, but in real life it squirts out, in synch with the beating heart. I take the unrealistic way it is shown in the QT movies (Reservoir Dogs excepted) as a wink to the audience that is all done in fun.

What I find interesting about Quentin Tarantino movies, much like Stanley Kubrick, is that I usually don't like them much the first viewing. However, they stick in my head, and make me think. Each subsequent viewing I get more out of them. I'm not saying anybody has to like QT movies, but I think they need to be seen at least twice to be appreciated.
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odiousgambit
odiousgambit
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August 27th, 2010 at 9:54:18 AM permalink
Definitely did not like "Pulp Fiction". I think one problem was that it was highly recommended to me, which sort of miffed me. What, am I some kind of drug addict getting a kick out of seeing someone shoot up heroin? etc etc etc. Just a shabby movie IMO on a multitude of sordid subjects. Would I have felt differently if I came across it randomly? Hard to say.

So, Nareed, you are not alone.
the next time Dame Fortune toys with your heart, your soul and your wallet, raise your glass and praise her thus: “Thanks for nothing, you cold-hearted, evil, damnable, nefarious, low-life, malicious monster from Hell!” She is, after all, stone deaf. ... Arnold Snyder

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