AZDuffman
AZDuffman
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February 22nd, 2014 at 8:42:20 AM permalink
Quote: boymimbo

I'm staying out of this one, except to say that Americans don't need to learn about Canada because it's unimportant to them, where as America is very important to us as a trading ally, a proctector, and the source for alot of porn and the butt of our jokes. And Canadians don't know much about Mexico, or Greenland, or Russia. We know alot about the USA because we all have access to American television and the CBC is just too damned boring (except when Mansbridge or hockey is on).

And I'll leave it at that. I know alot of highly intelligent Americans. I also know alot of dumb ones. The same is true for Canadians.



Sorry to upset those who say we never agree on anything, but this is basically how it is, except I wish I could get CBC online for news, Dragon's Den, and curling.

Way back in the late 1990s I was on some internet dating site and the girl I was talking to said she wanted to major in a Canadian History program in college (or teach it in some way.) Her biggest obstacle, she said, was she could not get *Canadians* interested in it! Their attitude, according to her, was that nothing interesting happened to Canada.
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
thecesspit
thecesspit
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February 22nd, 2014 at 9:18:16 AM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman

Sorry to upset those who say we never agree on anything, but this is basically how it is, except I wish I could get CBC online for news, Dragon's Den, and curling.

Way back in the late 1990s I was on some internet dating site and the girl I was talking to said she wanted to major in a Canadian History program in college (or teach it in some way.) Her biggest obstacle, she said, was she could not get *Canadians* interested in it! Their attitude, according to her, was that nothing interesting happened to Canada.



Once the second Louis Riel revolt ended, it's pretty dull. There's stages in 1960's when then French separatist movement had splinters that went into outright terrorism. But generally, it's quiet, political stuff internally and various times supporting (rather than directly prosecuting) larger wars and events externally. Plenty of good social anthropological stuff if that's your thing.

US history is much more interesting, but there's the old curse 'may you live in interesting times'....
"Then you can admire the real gambler, who has neither eaten, slept, thought nor lived, he has so smarted under the scourge of his martingale, so suffered on the rack of his desire for a coup at trente-et-quarante" - Honore de Balzac, 1829
Face
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Face
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February 22nd, 2014 at 10:14:46 AM permalink
I personally find Canada fascinating. After Russia (and excluding unpopulated Antarctica), it is the largest country in the world. Pretty sure it boasts the largest coastline, as well. It is absolutely enormous.

The amount of fresh water lakes boggles the mind. Hop on Google maps and check out northern Saskatchewan/Alberta/Manitoba. Just thousands and thousands and thousands of lakes that never seem to end. And up there, there is nothing. No towns, cities, villages, not even roads. It is untouched.

It's sort of the land that time forgot. And it relatively unmolested. No great resource acquisition projects, no major enemies, no major threats.

I believe Canada is the holder of the greatest quantity of untapped resources. If we were to measure wealth in goods held (even if not yet harvested), then Canada would come out on top. Within this millennium, I predict Canada will be the next dominate economic superpower, or will have been occupied and annexed because of it.
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AZDuffman
AZDuffman
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February 22nd, 2014 at 10:27:49 AM permalink
Quote: Face

I personally find Canada fascinating. After Russia (and excluding unpopulated Antarctica), it is the largest country in the world. Pretty sure it boasts the largest coastline, as well. It is absolutely enormous.

The amount of fresh water lakes boggles the mind. Hop on Google maps and check out northern Saskatchewan/Alberta/Manitoba. Just thousands and thousands and thousands of lakes that never seem to end. And up there, there is nothing. No towns, cities, villages, not even roads. It is untouched.

It's sort of the land that time forgot. And it relatively unmolested. No great resource acquisition projects, no major enemies, no major threats.

I believe Canada is the holder of the greatest quantity of untapped resources. If we were to measure wealth in goods held (even if not yet harvested), then Canada would come out on top. Within this millennium, I predict Canada will be the next dominate economic superpower, or will have been occupied and annexed because of it.



Canada has some unusual features. Long coastline, but most is unusable. Lots of water and resources but not enough population to really exploit them fully.

Canada has one of the best geopolitical locations on earth, she is protected by the USA so she needs no large navy or army. With ports on the two most important oceans of the world, she is well situated for trade. Canada is a kind of "relief valve" for the USA in some ways.

The current future for Canada is probably as a natural resource producer, including energy, with some manufacturing. Keep out of small conflicts. Deal with most anybody. Don't try to make a homegrown auto industry, or other homegrown ones where she cannot compete. Let everyone else do business and take the best.

Russia is in a similar situation, but less well located and more wanting to push influence.
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
Face
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Face
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February 22nd, 2014 at 10:37:11 AM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman


The current future for Canada is probably as a natural resource producer, including energy,...



Exactly. And there is no more important resource.

Look at the tiny, corrupt, mismanaged countries that currently lead in energy production. They and their leaders are rich beyond anyone's wildest dreams. And they remain so even under extreme duress, even war.

And sweet, gentle Canada probably has more than all of them combined. No real enemy, no real hate directed their way. No civil unrest, no insane governmental corruption.

If your heaven exists, then we'll see. We'll pull up a cloud and watch for a millennium or two. I'll bet you whatever passes for currency up there that Canada will become one of the most important regions in the world within 1,000 years ;)
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beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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February 22nd, 2014 at 12:20:48 PM permalink
Made me laugh, the reference to skis on the car in July. As a junior counselor in the Whiteshell PP in 1974, we had exACTly that experience while hiking along the highway in 100 degree weather in July. 4 Americans stopped their car to ask "which way to the snow?". Hysterical and embarassing; I heard about it the rest of the summer.

My Canadian grandfather was a sniper in WWI. It changed him, made him a reflective loner. So he became an explorer/surveyor/cartographer for the Hudson's Bay Company, and was away for months at a time, the first white man to see parts of Canada in many cases, mapping Nunavut above the Arctic Circle and along the northwestern edge of Hudson's Bay. He had an Indian guide he traveled with, and they lived mostly off the land for water and game with a lot of dried foods packed in. Awesome stories of his travels, talking about the barren wilderness up there. They were spotting for beaver populations, back when beaver hide was worth more than gold, ounce for ounce, as much as anything, but his stories got published several times in magazines up there.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
Buzzard
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February 22nd, 2014 at 12:24:36 PM permalink
" My Canadian grandfather was a sniper in WWI. " Just wondering how he lived with himself afterwards .
Shed not for her the bitter tear Nor give the heart to vain regret Tis but the casket that lies here, The gem that filled it Sparkles yet
Buzzard
Buzzard
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February 22nd, 2014 at 12:25:45 PM permalink
Don't have time to real all 9 pages. Are we talking about the Canada that people legally enter to illegally sneak into the USA. Just wondering, EH !
Shed not for her the bitter tear Nor give the heart to vain regret Tis but the casket that lies here, The gem that filled it Sparkles yet
beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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February 22nd, 2014 at 1:23:30 PM permalink
Quote: Buzzard

" My Canadian grandfather was a sniper in WWI. " Just wondering how he lived with himself afterwards .



Not very comfortably. That was kind of the point of his self-imposed solitary the rest of his life; he'd killed too many, seen too much. He was a very, very good shot as a prairie man of 18 when he entered the war. The British had over 35% casualties (over 2 million); Germany 64% ; Russia, France, and Romania lost over 70%. Austria-Hungary over 90%. It was truly a terrible, terrible war, especially the proliferation of mustard gas. 8.5 million killed, 21.1 wounded, 7.8 million missing or imprisoned. We hear so much about WWII history from this side of both wars, but WWI was just appalling.

I was born when he was about 60. He was a lean, handsome, quiet person with a dry wit and a lot of undemonstrative love for us. He took us downstairs a few times to allow us to play in his storage trunk, where he had a German pith helmet, sword, a bunch of medals, and some other things. He played cribbage with me until he went blind. Otherwise a very stern and cold man, but he loved my grandmother so much, that when she died of congestive heart failure, he refused to live without her, and was gone in less than 4 months with no health issues beyond a broken heart.

My ex-husband was a Vietnam Vet. He earned the Silver Star, 2 Bronze Stars, the Order of Vietnam, 3 Purple Hearts, and 16 Air Combat medals, among others. And he was a changed man as well, who does not live with himself very well. The story of how he earned his Silver Star is ghastly, and he has nightmares about it still. He's killed too many and seen too much as well. He's made himself a total expert on the history of 20th century conflicts, perhaps seeking answers of his own.

I don't know how any thinking person can not be profoundly affected by being ordered to kill or be killed.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
rudeboyoi
rudeboyoi
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February 22nd, 2014 at 1:32:17 PM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

So he became an explorer/surveyor/cartographer for the Hudson's Bay Company, and was away for months at a time, the first white man to see parts of Canada in many cases, mapping Nunavut above the Arctic Circle and along the northwestern edge of Hudson's Bay. He had an Indian guide he traveled with, and they lived mostly off the land for water and game with a lot of dried foods packed in. Awesome stories of his travels, talking about the barren wilderness up there. They were spotting for beaver populations, back when beaver hide was worth more than gold, ounce for ounce, as much as anything, but his stories got published several times in magazines up there.



This does sound awesome. I love the outdoors.

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