dwheatley
dwheatley
Joined: Nov 16, 2009
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January 11th, 2011 at 3:24:00 PM permalink
www.chess.com has a pretty solid interface. I like it buckets better than yahoo
Wisdom is the quality that keeps you out of situations where you would otherwise need it
NightStalker
NightStalker
Joined: Jul 25, 2010
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January 11th, 2011 at 4:52:18 PM permalink
I am also interested in playing free chess tournament, late entery accepted?
DorothyGale
DorothyGale
Joined: Nov 23, 2009
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January 11th, 2011 at 7:31:58 PM permalink
Why are you not using a "Swiss system" for pairings? Hmmm ... that is the standard way pairings are made in chess tournaments.
"Who would have thought a good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness!"
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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January 11th, 2011 at 7:35:44 PM permalink
Quote: DorothyGale

Why are you not using a "Swiss system" for pairings? Hmmm ... that is the standard way pairings are made in chess tournaments.



Pairing is always done on ability, anything else is too unbalanced.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
minnesotajoe
minnesotajoe
Joined: Dec 18, 2010
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January 11th, 2011 at 7:43:22 PM permalink
Nightstalker.. yea, you can be in.. I am sure that somebody won't be able to make it.

I don't know everybody's ability.. so the round robin format semed to be best bet.
DorothyGale
DorothyGale
Joined: Nov 23, 2009
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January 11th, 2011 at 7:44:25 PM permalink
Swiss systems are designed to quickly filter players to similar levels of ability, no matter how poor the initial rounds are lined up. Here, read about it ...

Swiss System Pairings...

Or just Google "Swiss system" and "Chess" to see a zillion reasons why it is the most common pairing algorithm for chess.
"Who would have thought a good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness!"
minnesotajoe
minnesotajoe
Joined: Dec 18, 2010
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January 11th, 2011 at 7:51:22 PM permalink
k i will look into it
mkl654321
mkl654321
Joined: Aug 8, 2010
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January 11th, 2011 at 7:54:48 PM permalink
Quote: DorothyGale

Swiss systems are designed to quickly filter players to similar levels of ability, no matter how poor the initial rounds are lined up. Here, read about it ...

Swiss System Pairings...

Or just Google "Swiss system" and "Chess" to see a zillion reasons why it is the most common pairing algorithm for chess.



Swiss Systems are only as accurate as the early results are reflective of the players' true abilities. On the other hand, a "knockout" format penalizes those who were randomly assigned to play with stronger players. I think that the two-out-of-three survivor method proposed is the best compromise. If two of the strongest players wind up in the same initial bracket, they should both survive. I realize that if two of the weakest players are fortunate enough to wind up in the same bracket, one of them will survive when he otherwise wouldn't, but I don't see any way around that, not without doing something unwieldy like a complete round robin.

Another obstacle to a Swiss is that we have no player rankings, so the first round pairings would be arbitrary. Two strong players accidentally meeting in the first round would result in one of them getting a zero, while two weak players meet, and one of them gets a 1. Not good. A Swiss with many rounds tends to even out this effect, but I don't think anyone has the time or patience for, say, twelve games.
The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one. The happiness of credulity is a cheap and dangerous quality.---George Bernard Shaw
DorothyGale
DorothyGale
Joined: Nov 23, 2009
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January 11th, 2011 at 8:01:27 PM permalink
Quote: mkl654321

A Swiss with many rounds tends to even out this effect, but I don't think anyone has the time or patience for, say, twelve games.

A Swiss system is optimal with [log(N)] + 1 rounds, where the log is base 2. So, if you have 12 people in the tourney, then you need 4 rounds in a SS, starting with arbitrary pairings, to determine a fair winner with approximately equally rated players competing for the top prize in the last round.

Again, all of this is well known, and is exactly why SS is used. There is nothing better.

Here are the upcoming UCSF rated tournaments in the US ...

Click me

If it starts with SS then it is a Swiss system... find one that's not!?
"Who would have thought a good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness!"
minnesotajoe
minnesotajoe
Joined: Dec 18, 2010
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January 11th, 2011 at 8:02:12 PM permalink
I know that a Swiss System Pairing would be best reflection.. but seeing as this is the first one, and that we are limited on time... the World Cup style I proposed seems to work.

If this is a success.. in future we can put more thought into it if there demand for another tournament.

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