Dieter
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Dieter
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December 1st, 2014 at 1:54:13 AM permalink
Quote: AxelWolf

Assuming your money is in a stamped envelope would that be a federal crime for a state or local police to tamper with it?



I am not a lawyer. (Consult your lawyer.)

That said, I think that you might have a chance if it's cancelled - that is, mailed. I don't think you get any special protections by slapping a stamp on an envelope addressed to yourself.

USPIS can do asset forfeiture too, however, and are already on the lookout for money laundering. (Mailing any significant amount of money might show up on their radar.)

Mailing large amounts of cash is already generally regarded as a dumb idea. (It could get stolen, lost, delayed or damaged by automated handling equipment. For "legitimate" transactions, there are "better" ways of moving money.)

IF I was going to try and use mail protections, I'd get a post office box at the nearest post office that actually sorts mail, and mail the letter from that post office. This should minimize the handling, and the chance for loss.

In case you're not aware, there are special restrictions on stamped mail over 13 ounces. It either has to be handed to a postal clerk or mailed from an APC kiosk. (This likely starts to come into play at around $28k in $100's per parcel, once you add in the weight of the envelope and other protective packaging.)
May the cards fall in your favor.
Dieter
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Dieter
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December 1st, 2014 at 2:14:14 AM permalink
Quote: RS

I believe it's a federal crime to send cash through the USPS (United States Postal Service). Then again, how would they find out if there's cash in the envelope if they're not allowed in it?



I don't believe it's a crime to send cash through the USPS. (Their FAQ - search for "what is covered by domestic insurance" - says you can insure registered mail of cash up to face value, limit $25,000.)

I'm pretty sure that US currency is of a distinctive size and shape, and they can X-Ray letters and parcels without opening them, probably looking for that distinctive shape of a brick of notes. Also, if you're insuring it, you probably have to say what's inside. (Insurance, btw, is at 90c/$100 of value.)
May the cards fall in your favor.
DrawingDead
DrawingDead
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December 1st, 2014 at 2:22:59 AM permalink
Quote: RS

I would prefer chips if I primarily played table games (at that specific casino) and if my BR was large enough for that. Having $5,000 in Wynn chips is not helpful if you're trying to play VP at Mandalay Bay. They might be useful at MB if you're trying to play a table game....or maybe they aren't. Depends if they let you cash them (duh). If you're wonging into shoes, very good to have chips. If you don't want to continuously be buying-in when you're "chasing", good to have chips. If you're going to all-play in BJ or some other game, eh, doesn't really matter IMO.

It really depends on your situation, what you play and how you play.



If you're talking about traveling with money / safety, I'd think you're much safer with chips than actual cash.

Yes, I was thinking about chips vs. cash in the necessary driving to and from often with the designated casino bankroll. I'm in the habit of being fanatical about keeping casino related bankroll totally religiously separate both in an accounting sense and physically for many other reasons unrelated to this thread topic, and for me it happens that both the casino books and the poker rooms do routinely treat their casino's chips as cash whether for buy-ins or making an individual wager at a window or funding your advance deposit wagering account, so no added 'friction' would be added to the transaction there.

I definitely can see where chips and something like the VP bill acceptor slots wouldn't be so friction-free for others. On the slot floor I'm an oaf who is befuddled for a minute yet again by the little task of even finding where to stick the card vs. the paper on those occasions when they give me some kind of thing I have to run through a machine to launder into spendable money. Ooops, I said launder, I meant "play" so please don't seize my freeplay coupon; they have expiration dates. See there, now I'm becoming one of those, and soon I may start to hear a strange rustling noise out there amidst my cactus. So here's an ignorant little question: When you hit "cash-out" and it spits out your voucher from whatever credits you had in there, if you don't choose to go feed it to the thing that turns it into currency, does that voucher expire at some point?
"I'm against stuff like crack and math" --AxelWolf
Dieter
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Dieter
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December 1st, 2014 at 2:32:39 AM permalink
Quote: DrawingDead

When you hit "cash-out" and it spits out your voucher from whatever credits you had in there, if you don't choose to go feed it to the thing that turns it into currency, does that voucher expire at some point?



The ones I see around here all say that they expire after 30 days. I believe that; I've kept a few low-value vouchers as a test. They worked on day 29; they didn't on day 31.

If they expire, expect that the expiration period is clearly marked. Expect the expiration to be based on the time/date of issuance (also clearly marked).
May the cards fall in your favor.
DrawingDead
DrawingDead
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December 1st, 2014 at 2:47:12 AM permalink
Thanks for the reply. For just a moment I had a fleeting thought about whether those could be treated as handy alternatives as a store of value for one's designated casino money. Buh-bye to that moment. Of course some kind of dating would seem to be natural, since the business doesn't want to carry it on their books floating out there indefinitely with a probability but not certainty that it will eventually be presented for payment at some indeterminate date.

EDIT to add: I just looked at one of my tickets from a casino's book. Not a slot or VP ticket. I'm quite familiar with the expiration dates of wager tickets there in the book, which are the typical 120 days from "event" date (rather than related to date of purchase), but I just now paid a moment of attention to this additional language following wager expiration terms that states: "Cash vouchers are valid for sixty days from date of issuance." I tend to suspect that cash voucher expiration terms may be consistent among different parts of the casino, unlike some other separate things that are necessarily unique to the operation of race & sports books. So there, that's probably that, I said to myself.
"I'm against stuff like crack and math" --AxelWolf
RS
RS
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December 1st, 2014 at 3:53:30 AM permalink
TITO (Ticket In Ticket Out) vouchers do expire. I've never seen one (or at least noticed) one that didn't have an expiration. They tend to say something like "Issued: MM/DD/YYYY HH/MM/SS. Expires in XXX Days". In Vegas, I've noticed most are 180 days.

I did have a voucher from the Tropicana for like $30 or $40 bucks and it was about to expire but I couldn't get it cashed before then. I called them and asked if they would still honor the voucher, even though expired, and they said they would. I believe there were some limitations on it, though, like the value of the ticket as well as how many days expired it was. But, I wouldn't plan on the casino honoring an expired ticket.
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
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December 1st, 2014 at 4:03:05 AM permalink
>Ok, let's take it point by point.
Sure but remember my moniker is FleaStiff so I'm not ever transporting the large sums you guys are. And while I have a Persona on this forum, I do not really work as a porn slapper or as a panhandler, nor do I actually buy into a craps game for twenty dollars. I do not eat at a homeless shelter and I do not actually live in a cardboard box that magically has an internet connection.

Show me someone, anyone who has had their car taken for no valid reason. So you are telling me people are being pulled over for no reason and their cars are being taken?? Where is the Huffington Post on this? I must have missed it while they were defending everyone else in the world.
....So look up the old Datelines 48Hours 60Minutes etc. that have done stories on some "drug roads" having so many pretextual stops motorists are avoiding them. If the stop doesn't yield drugs, the cops use intimidation for a consent to search. Out of state plates and high value vehicles are targeted.

>Next, who the hell has a "secret" compartment in his or her car?
A woman who bought it at auction and foolishly consented to a search at a road side stop.

>Casino? It's not a dirty word anymore and they are everywhere.
I'm sure the Tribal Police won't take your money, but hop onto the interstate and see what happens.

>Why does any Repo man have any concerns with cars he doesn't have a claim on?
The equipment scans EVERYONE and beeps if he gets a hit, then they dispatch a tow truck.

> Of course they have GPS on every car bought on a shitty credit plan.
IF Honest John pays for it.

>Maybe, just maybe people traveling with 20K in cash should have concerns, ...
The cops won't find that 20K until they make a stop based on a profile or make a stop for some other reason and get lucky. Its always a financial gain for the department to seize anything.
bobsims
bobsims
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December 1st, 2014 at 4:39:40 AM permalink
Quote: Boz

Sorry I disagree. You may have heard from someone who says this happened to them but I don't think they gave you the entire story. This is still America and they don't just keep your money if you can explain why you have it. I think you are worrying about something that rarely happens, but perhaps I am way off base.


You are "way off base". You must have believed the "if you like your doctor you can keep him" line too.
bobsims
bobsims
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December 1st, 2014 at 4:42:03 AM permalink
Quote: RS

I was stopped in (Kansas?) about a year ago for "speeding". The car I was driving at the time was 100x nicer than any car within a hundred miles (I suspect that's why I got pulled over, but don't know for sure). After the usual BS " why did I get pulled over" blah blah blah, the cop was on a mission to find drugs in my car. I said no to a search. So they brought out a k9 dog unit and sniffed it. Of course it was a false hit or whatever it's called (when the policeman does something and the dog starts barking/scratching because of that...not because the dog smells any drugs). No drugs were found. Thankfully the only money I had was in my pocket which wasn't searched.


Pretty sure it's mostly just a southern thing. I don't plan on being in the South any time soon....at least without a gun I won't be.



When did Kansas become "The South".
Greasyjohn
Greasyjohn
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December 1st, 2014 at 8:49:26 AM permalink
Quote: bobsims

When did Kansas become "The South".



Kansas is about as South as you can get without being in the South. Came close to bieng a southern state before the Civil War.

After reading this thread I'm probably going to keep my money concealed in my car when I travel (and only keep a few bills in my wallet). Of course, I don't look or act anything like a drug dealer or criminal. No tats either. No 25" rims. No bling. I blend in like a chameleon. (Same thing at the BJ tables.)

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