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GenoDRPh
GenoDRPh 
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TigerWu
September 20th, 2022 at 5:02:43 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Those canvas sneakers we're the most uncomfortable shoes I ever wore in my life because the canvas stretched and they never fit right. And they were heavy. And they were cheaply made, I hated them. People don't realize in the fifties and sixties all these modern shoes didn't exist. You either wore canvas sneakers or leather shoes there's nothing in between. And we had a dress code in high school you couldn't wear these shoes to school. Boys had to wear shirt with a collar and slacks no blue jeans. And girls had to wear a dress or a skirt. The year after I graduated they dropped the dress code and things went downhill fast as far as discipline went. When I was in school if your hair touched the top of your ears you got sent home. If you disrupted your classroom in any fashion you got kicked out of school for three days. I have an old friend who taught High School in the 1960s through 2005 and he said everything went to hell in the late 70s and never got better. Kids could get away with bloody murder in the classroom and there was nothing you could do about it.
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Willing to bet you yell, "Hey kids, get off my lawn!" too...
tuttigym
tuttigym
Joined: Feb 12, 2010
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September 21st, 2022 at 7:51:25 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

In the sixties I don't remember seeing a single piece of clothing that had the maker of the clothing displayed on it. No Calvin Klein jeans, no Jordache t-shirts. Not even any shirts that had any kind of writing on them they didn't come later until the 70s.
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I grew up in the 40's and 50's and remember that all Levi blue jeans had their name on a leather tag on the belt loop area.

tuttigym
TigerWu
TigerWu
Joined: May 23, 2016
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September 21st, 2022 at 7:55:10 AM permalink
Quote: GenoDRPh

Quote: EvenBob

Those canvas sneakers we're the most uncomfortable shoes I ever wore in my life because the canvas stretched and they never fit right. And they were heavy. And they were cheaply made, I hated them. People don't realize in the fifties and sixties all these modern shoes didn't exist. You either wore canvas sneakers or leather shoes there's nothing in between. And we had a dress code in high school you couldn't wear these shoes to school. Boys had to wear shirt with a collar and slacks no blue jeans. And girls had to wear a dress or a skirt. The year after I graduated they dropped the dress code and things went downhill fast as far as discipline went. When I was in school if your hair touched the top of your ears you got sent home. If you disrupted your classroom in any fashion you got kicked out of school for three days. I have an old friend who taught High School in the 1960s through 2005 and he said everything went to hell in the late 70s and never got better. Kids could get away with bloody murder in the classroom and there was nothing you could do about it.
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Willing to bet you yell, "Hey kids, get off my lawn!" too...
link to original post



EB brings up an interesting point... if his high school teacher friend says everything started going to hell in the late 1970s, that would be kids who were 15-18, starting in, let's say, 1976. That gives us some birth years of 1958 to 1961 on the lower end, which was approaching the tail end of the Boomer generation. So why did it start there? Of course, the Boomers' parents were WWII era, and a lot of those folks were dealing with trauma and PTSD, and may not have been the best parents. Then you have the proliferation of leaded gasoline in the '50s, '60s, and '70s, which, if you believe the scientific studies, had a demonstrable negative effect on intelligence. Throw in the Vietnam War and all the other political strife of the '70s, and the problems just kept coming when THOSE people started having kids, then the spread of harder drugs in the '80s, larger urban areas leading to more crime, etc., etc., etc. EB is wrong as usual, though, and getting rid of dress codes had nothing to do with a loss of discipline. There have been far bigger problems at hand over the years.
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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September 21st, 2022 at 8:29:12 AM permalink
Quote: tuttigym

Quote: EvenBob

In the sixties I don't remember seeing a single piece of clothing that had the maker of the clothing displayed on it. No Calvin Klein jeans, no Jordache t-shirts. Not even any shirts that had any kind of writing on them they didn't come later until the 70s.
link to original post


I grew up in the 40's and 50's and remember that all Levi blue jeans had their name on a leather tag on the belt loop area.

tuttigym
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He more means it being prominent and the reason you bought the item.

Jeans were jeans until the early 1980s. They were not worn near as much before that, usually to work in and when you needed a "tough" pair of pants. The idea of wearing them to work, church, or anything even casual did not cross your mind. Then "designed jeans" came out. Jordache was the big name and they were $40-50 bucks a pair then. That is $110 today. They were just jeans with some name you were told was fancy. They did not have a TV set or something in them. Women were more into them because of the tight fir and Brooke Shields wore them. But they were jeans.

Other clothing had the same thing. A shirt cost more because it had an alligator on it. JCPenny countered this with a fox and a lower price. Soon your tennis shoes had to be Nike or you were not cool, Those also cost a premium, You still see violence over flipping tennis shoes. They are just shoes for crying out loud!
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
GenoDRPh
GenoDRPh 
Joined: Aug 4, 2022
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September 21st, 2022 at 8:42:12 AM permalink
Quote: TigerWu

Quote: GenoDRPh

Quote: EvenBob

Those canvas sneakers we're the most uncomfortable shoes I ever wore in my life because the canvas stretched and they never fit right. And they were heavy. And they were cheaply made, I hated them. People don't realize in the fifties and sixties all these modern shoes didn't exist. You either wore canvas sneakers or leather shoes there's nothing in between. And we had a dress code in high school you couldn't wear these shoes to school. Boys had to wear shirt with a collar and slacks no blue jeans. And girls had to wear a dress or a skirt. The year after I graduated they dropped the dress code and things went downhill fast as far as discipline went. When I was in school if your hair touched the top of your ears you got sent home. If you disrupted your classroom in any fashion you got kicked out of school for three days. I have an old friend who taught High School in the 1960s through 2005 and he said everything went to hell in the late 70s and never got better. Kids could get away with bloody murder in the classroom and there was nothing you could do about it.
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Willing to bet you yell, "Hey kids, get off my lawn!" too...
link to original post



Or it could just be grumpy old men, yapping about how the "kids today" have no respect. You know, like grumpy old men have been yapping about for every generation.

Gene


EB brings up an interesting point... if his high school teacher friend says everything started going to hell in the late 1970s, that would be kids who were 15-18, starting in, let's say, 1976. That gives us some birth years of 1958 to 1961 on the lower end, which was approaching the tail end of the Boomer generation. So why did it start there? Of course, the Boomers' parents were WWII era, and a lot of those folks were dealing with trauma and PTSD, and may not have been the best parents. Then you have the proliferation of leaded gasoline in the '50s, '60s, and '70s, which, if you believe the scientific studies, had a demonstrable negative effect on intelligence. Throw in the Vietnam War and all the other political strife of the '70s, and the problems just kept coming when THOSE people started having kids, then the spread of harder drugs in the '80s, larger urban areas leading to more crime, etc., etc., etc. EB is wrong as usual, though, and getting rid of dress codes had nothing to do with a loss of discipline. There have been far bigger problems at hand over the years.
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tuttigym
tuttigym
Joined: Feb 12, 2010
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September 22nd, 2022 at 11:47:25 AM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman


Jeans were jeans until the early 1980s. They were not worn near as much before that, usually to work in and when you needed a "tough" pair of pants. The idea of wearing them to work, church, or anything even casual did not cross your mind.


Where I grew up, Hollywood, CA., the standard pant for all us kids was blue jeans, i.e., Levis. Teachers, male, were required to wear coats and ties as was the case in the business word. Other working men wore Levis for the most part.

tuttigym
lilredrooster
lilredrooster 
Joined: May 8, 2015
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September 22nd, 2022 at 12:24:33 PM permalink
_______________


the worst thing that ever happened to jeans, as well as other pants was imo bell bottoms

those were some seriously ugly a** pants - hard to believe they were as popular as they were


.
"believe half of what you see and none of what you hear" - Edgar Allan Poe
rxwine
rxwine
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lilredrooster
September 22nd, 2022 at 12:29:13 PM permalink
Worst material for a suit = polyester

Fair is fair, if unprovable claims are insisted to be true, one should be able to use unprovable methods of debunking.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 22nd, 2022 at 1:03:17 PM permalink
Quote: TigerWu



EB brings up an interesting point... if his high school teacher friend says everything started going to hell in the late 1970s, that would be kids who were 15-18, starting in, let's say, 1976. That gives us some birth years of 1958 to 1961 on the lower end, which was approaching the tail end of the Boomer generation. So why did it start there? Of course, the Boomers' parents were WWII era, and a lot of those folks were dealing with trauma and PTSD, and may not have been the best parents. Then you have the proliferation of leaded gasoline in the '50s, '60s, and '70s, which, if you believe the scientific studies, had a demonstrable negative effect on intelligence. Throw in the Vietnam War and all the other political strife of the '70s, and the problems just kept coming when THOSE people started having kids, then the spread of harder drugs in the '80s, larger urban areas leading to more crime, etc., etc., etc. EB is wrong as usual, though, and getting rid of dress codes had nothing to do with a loss of discipline. There have been far bigger problems at hand over the years.
link to original post



Dress codes are an integral part of keeping discipline in school. This is why Catholic schools have dress codes and most private schools have dress codes because it keeps everybody in line. Getting rid of dress code was just part of it. In the seventies in movies and on TV they started portraying kids as being sarcastic smart asses to their teachers in class and real life kids started mimicking that. There's a direct connection between what we saw on TV and in the movies and what was happening in schools. You never saw that kind of thing in the 60s, teachers were respected.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
GenoDRPh
GenoDRPh 
Joined: Aug 4, 2022
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TigerWu
September 22nd, 2022 at 1:17:57 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Quote: TigerWu



EB brings up an interesting point... if his high school teacher friend says everything started going to hell in the late 1970s, that would be kids who were 15-18, starting in, let's say, 1976. That gives us some birth years of 1958 to 1961 on the lower end, which was approaching the tail end of the Boomer generation. So why did it start there? Of course, the Boomers' parents were WWII era, and a lot of those folks were dealing with trauma and PTSD, and may not have been the best parents. Then you have the proliferation of leaded gasoline in the '50s, '60s, and '70s, which, if you believe the scientific studies, had a demonstrable negative effect on intelligence. Throw in the Vietnam War and all the other political strife of the '70s, and the problems just kept coming when THOSE people started having kids, then the spread of harder drugs in the '80s, larger urban areas leading to more crime, etc., etc., etc. EB is wrong as usual, though, and getting rid of dress codes had nothing to do with a loss of discipline. There have been far bigger problems at hand over the years.
link to original post



Dress codes are an integral part of keeping discipline in school. This is why Catholic schools have dress codes and most private schools have dress codes because it keeps everybody in line. Getting rid of dress code was just part of it. In the seventies in movies and on TV they started portraying kids as being sarcastic smart asses to their teachers in class and real life kids started mimicking that. There's a direct connection between what we saw on TV and in the movies and what was happening in schools. You never saw that kind of thing in the 60s, teachers were respected.
link to original post



Hey kids, get off my lawn!

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