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MrV
MrV
Joined: Feb 13, 2010
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September 10th, 2021 at 12:39:17 PM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman

I remember calling the plugs "RCA Jacks."



They're still called that.

I remember the joy I experienced listening to LP's on my parents console Hi-Fi: this led me down the path of becoming an "audiophile."

RCA may be a memory; now I have American made equipment from companies most people have never heard of: Krell, Conrad-Johnson, Aerial, Parasound, Vincent, Chapman ...

America still makes some of if not THE BEST equipment, but you gotta look for it and no, it ain't cheap.

But it's worth it.
"What, me worry?"
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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September 10th, 2021 at 1:02:57 PM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman

were several random episodes of Beverly Hillbillies. More than any other sitcom. Not talking special episodes, either. So the show must have been more popular than anything today comparatively.



Don't misunderstand me, the 1st three or four seasons of the show were hilarious in the early 60s. It was a top 10 rated show and we always watched it and laughed. Remember after Goldfinger came out in 1964 and Jethro refitted the truck to be like the Aston Martin in the movie? And made a metal hat like Oddjob had? Those were the best years. It was the late sixties and into the early seventies when the show got really stupid because they ran out of material.

"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
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September 10th, 2021 at 1:08:44 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Don't misunderstand me, the 1st three or four seasons of the show were hilarious in the early 60s. It was a top 10 rated show and we always watched it and laughed. Remember after Goldfinger came out in 1964 and Jethro refitted the truck to be like the Aston Martin in the movie? And made a metal hat like Oddjob had? Those were the best years. It was the late sixties and into the early seventies when the show got really stupid because they ran out of material.



It was one of the last of call them "innocent" shows. In the early 70s the networks decided everything had to have an edge to it. Even "family" shows dealt in all kinds of serious issues and you might not want your kids to see. I cannot think of anything in "The Beverly Hillbillies" that a young kid should not see.
All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
tuttigym
tuttigym
Joined: Feb 12, 2010
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September 10th, 2021 at 1:29:01 PM permalink
Quote: billryan

F Troop.

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    That was my company's nick name in boot camp in 1968. Our last personnel inspection prior to graduation was a hoot. The other companies received no "hits" (demerits); my company had 42 hits. We were almost set back two weeks, but we managed to graduate because Vietnam was calling.

    tuttigym
    EvenBob
    EvenBob
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    September 10th, 2021 at 4:12:41 PM permalink
    Quote: AZDuffman

    It was one of the last of call them "innocent" shows. In the early 70s the networks decided everything had to have an edge to it. ]



    TV changed because the movies changed. In the early 70s most of the light-hearted comedies of the fifties and sixties disappeared and were replaced with movies like Serpico and Taxi Driver and The Godfather and endless movies about criminals and crime and cops. TV had to try and keep up.
    "It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
    AZDuffman
    AZDuffman
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    September 11th, 2021 at 4:30:59 AM permalink
    Quote: EvenBob

    TV changed because the movies changed. In the early 70s most of the light-hearted comedies of the fifties and sixties disappeared and were replaced with movies like Serpico and Taxi Driver and The Godfather and endless movies about criminals and crime and cops. TV had to try and keep up.

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    That goes with all of society changing. I have said it before, seeing JFK and Oswald killed right in front of everyone killed the post WWII "childhood" of America. Vietnam then put a stake thru its heart. Thus entertainment changed.
    All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
    EvenBob
    EvenBob
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    September 16th, 2021 at 5:41:55 PM permalink
    This was the toaster I grew up using in the early and mid 1950s. It was usually a disaster because there's no timer you have to constantly check it and for a kid that's really easy to burn toast. We finally got a Sunbeam pop-up toaster later in the fifties and the spring was so strong the toast flew up 3 in above the toaster and ended up on the floor if you didn't catch it.


    This mid-fifties chrome Sunbeam toaster was in practically every kitchen you went into in the late 1950s.
    "It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
    AZDuffman
    AZDuffman
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    September 17th, 2021 at 3:25:51 AM permalink
    Quote: EvenBob

    This was the toaster I grew up using in the early and mid 1950s. It was usually a disaster because there's no timer you have to constantly check it and for a kid that's really easy to burn toast. We finally got a Sunbeam pop-up toaster later in the fifties and the spring was so strong the toast flew up 3 in above the toaster and ended up on the floor if you didn't catch it.


    This mid-fifties chrome Sunbeam toaster was in practically every kitchen you went into in the late 1950s.

  • link to original post



    My grandparents had a neat toaster which put the bread down automatically. It was ancient and I have never seen that feature since. When they died I got it and it barely worked. I only wanted it for that weird feature. Being a manly male I took it apart to see if it could be fixed. Seems it worked by when you put the bread in a spring moved a real thin piece of metal to make contact and lower it. Kind of take apart you saw on "American Restoration" where you take the old thing apart and are amazed at what they used to build in the USA.

    It was a real thin piece of IIRC brass. But here is what happened. It was probably a wedding present they used for 60 years or more. And that real thin piece of metal they had just wore down to where it was too thin to make the contact! The rest of the thing would probably still be working today it was so well made.

    Other weird toaster was my dad's mother. It "clicked" like a timer when you pushed the toast down.
    All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others
    EvenBob
    EvenBob
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    September 17th, 2021 at 8:42:01 AM permalink
    Quote: AZDuffman



    My grandparents had a neat toaster which put the bread down automatically.



    "It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
    billryan
    billryan 
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    September 17th, 2021 at 9:05:18 AM permalink
    My grandmother had an old stove with a chamber called a well. It seemed to be multi-purpose. You could use it to keep food warm, heat up rolls without using the whole oven, and many other things. I'm surprised this seems to have disappeared from modern stoves. I'd almost forgotten about them until I was recently house hunting and came across one in a restored 1940s farmhouse.

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