VonVester
VonVester
Joined: Apr 25, 2011
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July 27th, 2016 at 9:53:58 AM permalink
The 'Best New Table Games Competition' is coming up in November at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas and I am interested in entering a game into the competition. The cost of the floor space, as I am sure many of you already know, is $3000 or $3500 if you purchase a 'Casino Journal' advertisement too.

My questions to those of you more familiar with the game design landscape is: Is this competition worth the investment? Do you get good industry exposure? Is this a well attended event?.
Paigowdan
Paigowdan
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July 27th, 2016 at 11:39:51 AM permalink
The cutting Edge conference is attended by table games managers and personnel who are actively interested in reviewing and trying new game designs, so yes, this is the exposure that could really help.

The field of new games is hit-and-miss, some sharp, some not so good, so if your game is fine, it may show very well.

Your game should be well-developed and ready to install, with math, artwork, dealing procedures (to be trainable), and the like.
Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes - Henry David Thoreau. Like Dealers' uniforms - Dan.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
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July 27th, 2016 at 12:03:49 PM permalink
(Long post alert...)



Cutting Edge is worth it, but only if you're ready for it.


You don't post much here, so maybe you don't know me. I invented a side bet that I'm trying to get into casinos. http://www.Poker-For-Roulette.com

I've been going to G2E for a few years, but in my opinion, that's not a great place for an independent person to introduce a table game. While there are plenty of people there, it attracts too diverse of a crowd.

Two years ago, I had thoughts like you're having. Is it worth it, what's the format, etc. So I paid for an attendee registration so I can see what it's all about.

The Cutting Edge show (formerly called Raving), is JUST about table games. It's a much smaller show than G2E - G2E takes up the entire Sands Convention Center floor for the expo, plus other rooms and banquet areas for ancillary items, Cutting Edge uses a banquet room about the size for a 200 guest wedding for the expo, and another room about the same size for their seminars. G2E has about 25,000 attendees, Cutting Edge has a couple hundred. Lastly, the focus of G2E is primarily slots and food & beverage. The focus of Cutting Edge is almost exclusively table games and side bets.

The format is fairly basic. It starts Monday evening with a cocktail reception where attendees can visit the booths. Tuesday all day and Wednesday morning, there are 45 minute to 1 hour seminars with in the next room with 30 minutes breaks in between. During the seminars, some attendees will stay in the expo room, visiting more booths. During the breaks, there is a rush as all the attendees come out and visit booths again.

Attendees are encouraged to visit each booth. They are given a voting ballot. Each vendor stamps their spot on the ballot. Just before lunch Wednesday, they mark the ballot with their favorite and turn the ballot in. Only ballots that have every vendor stamped will count. Also, valid ballots will get the attendee entered in the door prize raffle. Lunch is a catered deal with a keynote speaker, followed by results of the vote.

So, yeah, I think Cutting Edge is the ideal place to showcase your new game - assuming you're ready.


The next question is, are you ready?

If you think the cost is a mere $3,500 on top of your Vegas visit, you're in for a shock.

While one person is sufficient to man the booth during the down time when seminars are happening, you need a second (and maybe a third) to handle the rush during the breaks. The extra people don't necessarily need to know every detail about the game, they must know enough to talk about it, demonstrate it, and answer most basic questions.

You'll also need a variety of handouts. Business cards, rule cars, brochure, math report.

Let's not forget the actual table, with your custom printed felt. And some stools so the attendees can sit at the table like it's an actual casino game. Don't forget to get chips so we can bet!

Some type of SWAG is also a good touch. Pens, keychains, even Hershey's Kisses are fine, but something.

While you can rent the table and stools locally (ask the show management about that), printing the felt and shipping and storing all that other stuff is on you.


Last, but certainly not least, is your game ready? By that I mean, do you have a patent, and is it really a good game? Have you played it with your friends? Have you thought about all the possible kinks and issues, and worked them out?

Most important, do you really think you have a realistic chance of winning?


Good luck.
I invented a few casino games. Info: http://www.DaveMillerGaming.com/ 覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧 Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
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July 27th, 2016 at 12:39:46 PM permalink
Timing is everything. I just got an email about the show.

Here's the link to the web version:
http://eblast.bnpmedia.com/EVENTS/TGC16/TGC16_EB2/TGC16_EB2.html
I invented a few casino games. Info: http://www.DaveMillerGaming.com/ 覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧 Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁
VonVester
VonVester
Joined: Apr 25, 2011
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July 27th, 2016 at 12:43:20 PM permalink
Thank you both for the encouraging responses.

DJTeddyBear: I read your success story last night and it was quite encouraging. When I first got into this 'hobby' (I call it that because so far I have had nothing but expenses and the trill of the ride) I saw your posts on this forum (that was back in 2011) about your roulette side bet idea and then last night I saw your post about your success with Galaxy Gaming. Wow.. good job.

I do have a full patent, it is a little over 2 years old now. All the gaming math has been verified by GLI. I even have a professionally inked felt by Designs by Willy, who was recommended to me by members of this forum years ago.

Is the game a clear winner? Aren't they all clear winners in the eyes of their creators? The game is fun. Friends and family that have played it encourage me to try to sell it, however, they don't have to pay the bills required to do that. The one encouraging thing about my game is that everyone who has looked at it really likes it, but the people that have looked at it are the ones I paid to look at it. (i.e. my patent lawyer, GLI math guy, Willy Santiago...etc. ). The mathematician from GLI liked the game so much he was calling me just to discuss possible variations and ideas for bonus bets.

Anyway, whether or not the game wins, I am really just hoping for some exposure. I am not good at marketing, as a matter of record, I am downright awful at it and it even scares me. My experience at 2011 G2E was disappointing because I didn't come away with so much as a single good contact. However, on a personal level it was a smashing success in that I forced myself to approach several game companies and present my game. (Like Indian Jones jumping into a pit of snakes). Besides the personal growth aspect of this journey, I have had zero success in getting people in the industry to even look at my game. So I don't have any data to say if the game has potential.
Hunterhill
Hunterhill
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July 27th, 2016 at 2:49:56 PM permalink
Since you have a patent why not post the details of the game. You could get some opinions and constructive criticism from alot of experienced game designers.
The mountain is tall but grass grows on top of the mountain.
SM777
SM777
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July 27th, 2016 at 4:24:15 PM permalink
Von,

Please PM me. Happy to help coordinate a meeting for you with a large gaming company in Las Vegas.
DJTeddyBear
DJTeddyBear
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July 27th, 2016 at 4:56:52 PM permalink
Quote: VonVester

DJTeddyBear: I read your success story last night and it was quite encouraging. When I first got into this 'hobby' (I call it that because so far I have had nothing but expenses and the trill of the ride) I saw your posts on this forum (that was back in 2011) about your roulette side bet idea and then last night I saw your post about your success with Galaxy Gaming. Wow.. good job.

Thanks. Yeah, this "hobby" can be pricey. The patent and patent lawyer set me back a pretty penny. But if you ask my bookkeeper (wife), she'll say the expenses have been much more than my estimate. After all, she's adding the expenses (including gambling bankroll) for all the trips I've made to Vegas to show my game to whoever would listen. Not that I needed a reason to visit Vegas. :)


Quote: VonVester

Anyway, whether or not the game wins, I am really just hoping for some exposure. I am not good at marketing, as a matter of record, I am downright awful at it and it even scares me. My experience at 2011 G2E was disappointing because I didn't come away with so much as a single good contact.

For the record, I too am terrible at marketing and follow-up. I may have gotten lucky in that I became friends with PaiGowDan. For a while he was working for Galaxy Gaming, and he had suggested to them, on several occasions, that they look at my game. Thanks again, Dan!

The day after my first Cutting Edge (2014), I had a meeting at Galaxy's office. After an hour or so of them hitting me with all the right questions, I had my handshake agreement.

When you were at G2E in 2011, was it as an exhibitor, or attendee? Have you been back since?

If I recall correctly, I have been to Vegas at least 10 times in the last 4 years. Each time I was either passing business cads at shows, or had meetings set up to talk about the game. I DO think that part of that repetition led to some amount of familiarity, which may have helped when Dan was pushing my idea at Galaxy.

In addition to these visits, I attended a couple wedding professional's conferences in Vegas. At my last one, I met Dan, Mike and several other industry people, in an attempt to sell my other idea, Hit It Again. That idea died a quick death, but it gave me great insight into this side of the industry.
I invented a few casino games. Info: http://www.DaveMillerGaming.com/ 覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧 Superstitions are silly, childish, irrational rituals, born out of fear of the unknown. But how much does it cost to knock on wood? 😁
VonVester
VonVester
Joined: Apr 25, 2011
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July 27th, 2016 at 5:35:21 PM permalink
Quote: Hunterhill

Since you have a patent why not post the details of the game. You could get some opinions and constructive criticism from alot of experienced game designers.



Thank you for the invitation Hunterhill. I wasn't going to bore everyone with the details, however, like any true game designer, I love nothing more than waxing on about my latest project. I would absolutely love any advice, comments or criticism about the game. I honestly need to know any negatives about the game so don't hold back in the name of civility.

Casino Derby is a horse racing based table game. The really exciting part about it, for me, is the game resolution algorithm, which is also the primary focus of the patent. The algorithm may be used for a variety of games, limited only by the designer's imagination, and still be protected under the patent. The algorithm is a random number generator combined with a table of fixed 'bonuses' to each roll so that each element of the event (horses in a horse race in this case) has a different probability of finishing the race first.

This all sounds very complicated on paper, however, the game is simple to deal and easy for players to understand. The dealer uses dice or cards to randomly generate movement for the horses and then combines those numbers with '1's' or '0's' from a handicap chart to advance the horses along the track. Game bets are similar to horse racing bets and the payouts vary considerably depending upon which combination of horses you bet on. The time from start to payout for each race is about a minute and a half depending upon the amount of play, this is similar to a single spin of a roulette wheel.

Casino Derby was originally designed to be a table game, however, it also makes a fun slot game. I programmed a simple slot game using the 'Scratch' programming language. This game can be played on the Scratch website. The website is safe and is owned by Massachusetts Institute of Technology. I am not an artist, nor am I a computer programmer, however, the game works and will give you a better idea of the game mechanics. There are play instructions with the game and, if you click the blue square in the upper left corner, the game becomes full screen. The forum won't let me leave a wed address here, but if you go to the scratch website ( Google 'Scratch') and add the following line to the end of the address and hit <Enter>, you will get to the game:

/projects/109822715/

Give it a try, have fun, and let me know what you think.
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
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July 27th, 2016 at 5:50:46 PM permalink
Here's the link.

https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/109822715/
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.

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