Thread Rating:

Poll

9 votes (45%)
1 vote (5%)
8 votes (40%)
No votes (0%)
3 votes (15%)
4 votes (20%)
1 vote (5%)
4 votes (20%)
4 votes (20%)
3 votes (15%)

20 members have voted

Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 127
  • Posts: 13457
January 29th, 2018 at 7:27:25 AM permalink
Perhaps telling is the fact that my auto-correct changed the thread title to NFL, twice.

In any event, I'm starting this thread as a companion to my article published today:

https://wizardofvegas.com/articles/is-the-xfl-a-good-bet/

Detailing the revival of the XFL. Hopefully, if any of you guys heard the news or watched the original XFL, this will make for an interesting conversation. Please feel free to comment in either this thread or the comments section of the article, but I'm going to say, preferably in the thread.

My article discusses the initial national exposure of the WWF (late 70's and 80's), WWE moving into movies, cross-promotions with boxing, cross-promotions with football, the failure of the first incarnation of the XFL and what it will take for this version to succeed...which is a long shot.

I'm putting this thread in, 'Sports Betting,' for two reasons:

1.) Believe it or not, Vegas actually accepted action and booked lines for the original XFL. I can't imagine what the hell they'd have based it off of for the first few games, especially with the unusual rules, but there you go.

2.) I think 100 million dollars is a Hell of a large bet, and that's McMahon's initial outlay (without a partner, this time) in the new league.

Thanks for reading and any comments either in that page or this thread!

There is also a poll above, the question is: What is your opinion of the new XFL? You can also choose any of the silly options as this is a multi-choice poll.
Vultures can't be choosers.
SM777
SM777
Joined: Apr 8, 2016
  • Threads: 6
  • Posts: 762
January 29th, 2018 at 7:35:09 AM permalink
If XFL can get top talent, it has the chance for success.

The best way of doing this is undermining the NFL's draft eligibility rules. Which state you must have been out of high school for three years.

So, the XFL should offer contracts and pay to the top players out of high. All of those ESPN Top 300 recruits. Get these talented guys in, and have a league with skilled players.

There's more to it than that. But getting talent is a good first step.
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 127
  • Posts: 13457
January 29th, 2018 at 7:55:19 AM permalink
Quote: SM777

If XFL can get top talent, it has the chance for success.

The best way of doing this is undermining the NFL's draft eligibility rules. Which state you must have been out of high school for three years.

So, the XFL should offer contracts and pay to the top players out of high. All of those ESPN Top 300 recruits. Get these talented guys in, and have a league with skilled players.

There's more to it than that. But getting talent is a good first step.



Absolutely, definitely mentioned that towards the end of my article. That's under the, "Compete, but Not Exactly," heading.

I definitely agree with you with the only problem being the NFL may categorically decide (spoken or unspoken) that it will not take XFL players under any circumstances after the three years if they have played in the XFL. I doubt if that would be the case, as the NFL's goal should be to field the best possible product, which you do by having the best possible players, but it's a remote possibility.

Aside from that, the NFL could simply double-undermine the XFL by simply abolishing the rule and allowing players to be drafted right out of high school. It's pretty silly that they are not allowed to do that as it is. Let's face it: If you're only going to college to stay in football shape and have no intention of finishing your degree before declaring for the draft, (some players do, others don't) then there's really no reason to be there.

However, if the NFL keeps the same rule, I agree 100%. The XFL needs to be going, knocking on doors and trying to recruit players just like the colleges. They can say, "Look, we're going to get you prepared for the NFL, but the difference is you get cash money and can sign a sponsorship with anyone you like."
Vultures can't be choosers.
AxelWolf
AxelWolf
Joined: Oct 10, 2012
  • Threads: 151
  • Posts: 19292
Thanks for this post from:
Mission146PokerGrindersmoothgrhtringlomane
January 29th, 2018 at 8:11:07 AM permalink
HE HATE ME
♪♪Now you swear and kick and beg us That you're not a gamblin' man Then you find you're back in Vegas With a handle in your hand♪♪ Your black cards can make you money So you hide them when you're able In the land of casinos and money You must put them on the table♪♪ You go back Jack do it again roulette wheels turinin' 'round and 'round♪♪ You go back Jack do it again♪♪
Joeman
Joeman
Joined: Feb 21, 2014
  • Threads: 35
  • Posts: 1912
Thanks for this post from:
Mission146tringlomane
January 29th, 2018 at 8:11:24 AM permalink
Great article, Mission!

I think the XFL is doomed for the reasons you stated, plus those fans who remember the old XFL will be expecting it to fail.

As you mentioned, the NFL has already adopted some of the XFL's good ideas. (IIRC, didn't the XFL also pioneer the "in-game" sideline interview?) There doesn't appear to be anything novel about this incarnation of the XFL to garner interest.

I do like the idea of getting players straight from high school. I believe there is a niche there to be had for kids that can't/don't want to go to college to continue their football careers. However, the only way I see this as sustainable is if it does become either an "official" or de facto developmental league for the NFL; an idea the XFL is opposed to.

We'll see. I'll probably put on my He Hate Me jersey* and watch the first game.

No, I don't really have a He Hate Me jersey!


Edit: Tried to get in b4 He Hate Me. 17 sec too late! Dang it, Axel! :P
"Dealer has 'rock'... Pay 'paper!'"
mcallister3200
mcallister3200
Joined: Dec 29, 2013
  • Threads: 17
  • Posts: 2689
Thanks for this post from:
RogerKint
January 29th, 2018 at 8:20:38 AM permalink
I think players out of high school is a really bad idea. I think thereís too much physical development left and thereís a big difference in how important those 2-3 years of physical development are in a sport as physical as football vs basketball or baseball. Just my opinion.
I think a lot of those kids would be getting crushed, too many of them careers virtually ended at 19-20 by 25-34 yo nfl washouts many of whom were top 300 recruits. Career ending injuries happen in college too but I just feel there would be a spike with players playing against each other who are too often at different levels of physical development.
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 127
  • Posts: 13457
January 29th, 2018 at 8:38:12 AM permalink
Quote: Joeman

Great article, Mission!

As you mentioned, the NFL has already adopted some of the XFL's good ideas. (IIRC, didn't the XFL also pioneer the "in-game" sideline interview?) There doesn't appear to be anything novel about this incarnation of the XFL to garner interest.



Thanks for the compliment!

I don't know that they pioneered the sideline interview, but what they did pioneer was putting a microphone on the players. The NFL has kept that for their Mic'd Up shows as well as keeping a camera on...it's either the Center or one of the Guards...so that you can hear the quarterback calling the snap. THat's why you can hear Tom Brady shouting, "Green, 19! Green, 19!" all the time whereas you would not have that prior to a certain year.

I actually mentioned that prior to proofreading myself. Believe it or not, I trimmed that article by about 2,000 words. I felt that it may well get brought up separately, and that I'd already mentioned enough of the XFL's (limited) successes.

Quote:

I do like the idea of getting players straight from high school. I believe there is a niche there to be had for kids that can't/don't want to go to college to continue their football careers. However, the only way I see this as sustainable is if it does become either an "official" or de facto developmental league for the NFL; an idea the XFL is opposed to.

We'll see. I'll probably put on my He Hate Me jersey* and watch the first game.

No, I don't really have a He Hate Me jersey!


Edit: Tried to get in b4 He Hate Me. 17 sec too late! Dang it, Axel! :P



They can be a de facto league regardless of who is opposed or not opposed to it. Like I mentioned in the article, if an NFL team offers a substantial amount of money for one of your player's contracts, I don't know how you say no. It would be foolish to do so in every conceivable way, not to mention seriously ticking off that player.

I like the idea because I think the three-year thing is absurd. I honestly wouldn't have as much of a problem if the colleges would let the players have sponsorships, but not for the colleges to pay them directly, of course. The schools themselves profit off of player's likenesses all the time, and they certainly have the team brand sponsored. It's effectively paying WAY less indirectly (scholarships) than the labor is worth.
Vultures can't be choosers.
Mission146
Mission146
Joined: May 15, 2012
  • Threads: 127
  • Posts: 13457
January 29th, 2018 at 8:46:22 AM permalink
Quote: mcallister3200

I think players out of high school is a really bad idea. I think thereís too much physical development left and thereís a big difference in how important those 2-3 years of physical development are in a sport as physical as football vs basketball or baseball. Just my opinion.



I think that's a terrific argument and I don't disagree with you. My only counters are:

1.) If that's a risk the player wants to take, then let him.

AND

2.) You potentially have college freshmen going up against seniors, and that's not a whole lot different. You're still looking at guys who are still arguably kids against guys who are arguably fully grown and fully developed men.

Quote:

I think a lot of those kids would be getting crushed, too many of them careers virtually ended at 19-20 by 25-34 yo nfl washouts many of whom were top 300 recruits. Career ending injuries happen in college too but I just feel there would be a spike with players playing against each other who are too often at different levels of physical development.



It's happened to college guys, as you mentioned, the difference being the college guys didn't get any cash money in the interim. Either way, when you have the requisite skill to make money doing something, and you're doing it for free or for indirect pay, you're taking a risk.

The only way I could side with you, and I don't fundamentally disagree with your position, is if one of two things happened:

1.) The NFL KEEPS the three-year rule, except they can sign players directly out of high school who cannot play college ball. While the NFL pays for the rights to the player, and pays a salary to retain that player, the player cannot play during the time. Naturally, the player is permitted to train during that time and can attend college without playing.

They do this in baseball and a student can attend college and play in the Minors. The main difference is the NFL has no Minors.

2.) Let the kids have paid sponsorships while in college! They're not getting paid by a team, but rather by a sponsor.

This post brought to you by Carl's Jr. (Kidding)
Vultures can't be choosers.
mcallister3200
mcallister3200
Joined: Dec 29, 2013
  • Threads: 17
  • Posts: 2689
January 29th, 2018 at 9:17:49 AM permalink
In the end, itís probably close to irrelevant whether they can pull 19 year olds or not. They arenít going to come into the xfl with name recognition from casual fans, and the ones that are really good and develop are going to go to the nfl anyway after 2-4 years for the most part.
RS
RS
Joined: Feb 11, 2014
  • Threads: 62
  • Posts: 8623
Thanks for this post from:
Mission146
January 29th, 2018 at 9:28:13 AM permalink
I just hope it's a medium success for sports betting reasons. If it dies out, then nothing to bet on. If it gains popularity super crazily, then sportsbooks will have sharper lines.

  • Jump to: