supergrass
supergrass
Joined: Apr 6, 2014
  • Threads: 13
  • Posts: 58
October 5th, 2014 at 8:10:58 AM permalink
some what a trivial thing

if on line 1 the symbols are substitute - substitute - 9 - 10 - 9
If three 9s pay 20 credits, and 2 substitute (aka wild) pay 10 credits then this line is counted as three 9s.
If three 9s pay 5 credits, and 2 substitute pay 10 credits then this line is counted as two substitutes.
What happens if three 9s pay 10 credits, and 2 substitutes also pay 10 credits. Is this line three 9s or two substitutes?

On the newer machines, the winning symbols will animated so one can tell the difference.
For example, the substitute may animate as a dancing 9 which means the line is counted as three 9s.
Or if the substitute animate as a substitute and the 9 symbol is not dancing which means the line is counted as two substitute.
beachbumbabs
Administrator
beachbumbabs
Joined: May 21, 2013
  • Threads: 99
  • Posts: 14232
October 5th, 2014 at 3:10:24 PM permalink
Quote: supergrass

some what a trivial thing

if on line 1 the symbols are substitute - substitute - 9 - 10 - 9
If three 9s pay 20 credits, and 2 substitute (aka wild) pay 10 credits then this line is counted as three 9s.
If three 9s pay 5 credits, and 2 substitute pay 10 credits then this line is counted as two substitutes.
What happens if three 9s pay 10 credits, and 2 substitutes also pay 10 credits. Is this line three 9s or two substitutes?

On the newer machines, the winning symbols will animated so one can tell the difference.
For example, the substitute may animate as a dancing 9 which means the line is counted as three 9s.
Or if the substitute animate as a substitute and the 9 symbol is not dancing which means the line is counted as two substitute.



There's almost always a line in the rules that says something like, "Only highest win per payline will count." So, if you look at the paytable, I expect the machine counts the higher pay (which would likely be the 2 wilds, since it takes less of them to generate a pay than the 3 9's). However, I don't program slots for a living, so that's just a guess.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
tringlomane
tringlomane
Joined: Aug 25, 2012
  • Threads: 8
  • Posts: 6272
October 5th, 2014 at 3:24:34 PM permalink
Quote: beachbumbabs

There's almost always a line in the rules that says something like, "Only highest win per payline will count." So, if you look at the paytable, I expect the machine counts the higher pay (which would likely be the 2 wilds, since it takes less of them to generate a pay than the 3 9's). However, I don't program slots for a living, so that's just a guess.



That is the way it would probably be registered, but in reality it doesn't matter if both pay the same amount and would be the slot designer's option. I know when the Wizard deconstructed slots, he always made the more valuable symbol be the one that counted (i.e. the 2 wilds)
tringlomane
tringlomane
Joined: Aug 25, 2012
  • Threads: 8
  • Posts: 6272
October 5th, 2014 at 3:24:35 PM permalink
duplicate
RobertMuir
RobertMuir
Joined: Aug 3, 2014
  • Threads: 0
  • Posts: 6
October 5th, 2014 at 11:03:14 PM permalink
Quote: supergrass

What happens if three 9s pay 10 credits, and 2 substitutes also pay 10 credits. Is this line three 9s or two substitutes?


When the prize value is the same it tends to be company dependent. There's more than one way of deciding, and there's other cases where this can occur.

  • Jump to: